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Schenk
Off Leash Man



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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 9:53 am 
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I have carried climbing helmets, ski helmets, and bike helmets on the outside on a pack at one time or another.
One handy thing is a length of strong bungee cord, looped through a good toggle to adjust the size/length.
A long, narrow (1/2"-5/8"), nylon strap with a ladder lock/slider buckle has been handy in the past too.
Play around with it, you will find a good way to rig a carry method with your specific helmet.

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RandyHiker
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 9:54 am 
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DIYSteve wrote:
Except, in your case, your head, which is part of upper body. Ventilating head is key to keeping the body cool.

No more so than any other part of your body.  The old myth that the head is a more critical heat dump than other parts of the body is just that, a myth.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/dec/17/medicalresearch-humanbehaviour

Perhaps because I have thick hair, I notice less cooling differential when I go hatless/helmet less than others.
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christensent
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 9:55 am 
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I just clip the helmet strap to something on the pack and let it dangle. Punch it a few times to knock out loose snow and put it on. If it's a day where your helmet is getting covered in snow, odds are you're already dripping with water anyways so what's a few extra flakes melting in your hair.

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Learning mountaineering: 10% technical knowledge, 90% learning how to eat
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BigBrunyon
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 10:00 am 
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Look I carry mine on the OUTSIDE!! let's people I pass know that I have BIG OBJECTIVES out there head of me!!!

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GeoTom
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 10:17 am 
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There's an easy solution:

Wear bike helmet, stash climbing helmet to outside of pack, put skiing helmet inside pack.

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treeswarper
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Alleged Sockpuppet!
PostMon Dec 10, 2018 11:03 am 
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GeoTom wrote:
There's an easy solution:

Wear bike helmet, stash climbing helmet to outside of pack, put skiing helmet inside pack.

I can't help but imagine an entire necklace of helmets.  I would call it The Necklace Of Safety.  Must use ominous sounding voice for that.

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What's especially fun about sock puppets is that you can make each one unique and individual, so that they each have special characters. And they don't have to be human––animals and aliens are great possibilities
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Schenk
Off Leash Man



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Off Leash Man
PostMon Dec 10, 2018 11:11 am 
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rotf.gif  rotf.gif

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DIYSteve
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 12:41 pm 
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GeoTom wrote:
There's an easy solution:

Wear bike helmet, stash climbing helmet to outside of pack, put skiing helmet inside pack.

helmet quiver on the go  up.gif
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DIYSteve
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 12:43 pm 
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RandyHiker wrote:
The old myth that the head is a more critical heat dump than other parts of the body is just that, a myth.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2008/dec/17/medicalresearch-humanbehaviour

Nice try. You misrepresented the conclusion of the study. Nobody on this thread suggested that you "lose most of your heat through your head." Nobody. Dumping heat from all parts of the body is critical. Head is part of the body. Therefore, dumping heat from the head is critical. Furthermore, exposing the head is the simplest way to dump heat because it's as easier to take off a hat than to remove underwear, socks or ski boots. Removing gloves in cold weather creates discomfort for most people. Sheez, this doesn't need to be explained to an experienced ski tourist -- unless he wants to pick a fight.

Anyway, OP asked for recos re strapping a helmet on a pack, not for a mommy lecture.
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DigitalJanitor
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Dirt hippie
PostMon Dec 10, 2018 2:47 pm 
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Jeez....

Only relevant helmet experience I have is with bike helmets, but while climbing/pushing I HAVE had my head overheated to the point that I was getting light headed and seeing stars, and once even went down on my face when all the dashboard lights went dim just after I'd turned downhill. Dinged up my chin and shoulder on that one and IMO I got off easy without anything more than scrapes and later on an ocular migraine bad enough that I really couldn't see much for a bit.

Since I think the point is trying to prevent injury, seems like there's a good case for removing the lid when overheating is a greater risk than actually falling/getting hit.

But what do I know. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

P.S. if you look at videos for Osprey Lid Lock, you'll see how those work. Seems like it would be stupid easy to retrofit something like that up with a bit of thin elastic cord and a plastic doodad.

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joker
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 2:51 pm 
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I've always assumed that one of the bigger differences between the head and other extremities is that your circulatory system won't cut off blood flow to the head even as hypothermia sets in. But in any case, it is clearly one more place where what you do or don't wear can have a significant impact on overall body temperature and comfort and dryness. On ski climbs I often strip to t-shirt and either zip open shell pant legs that are over just short underwear or else drop to shorts depending on what I'm wearing on my legs that day. Even a mesh top ballcap can make a noticeable difference. Yes there is probably some added risk from tree bombs as a result but there's also a risk from soaking my base layers with sweat, and I'm sure we can also find deaths that occured due to hypothermia that was exacerbated by sweaty clothing. Life is full of tradeoffs.
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RandyHiker
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 2:59 pm 
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DIYSteve wrote:
socks or ski boots.

You are overreaching with this counter argument.   I never suggested such nonsense.

RandyHiker wrote:
I'll strip down to bare skin on my upper body and adjust pace if needed
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scottk
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 4:44 pm 
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All of my packs have a couple straps or attachment points that are about 4-6 inches apart and clipping the chin strap of the helmet through both seems to prevent any major bouncing.  Generally it's pretty easy to knock out most of the snow before you put it on.
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uww
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 11:24 pm 
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I just fill mine up with my lunch or something and stuff it in as hard as I can.
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kevin98208
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PostTue Dec 11, 2018 8:10 am 
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I also usually stick my helmet in my backpack and stuff my lunch in it.  The upside is that my lunch is protected and easy to get to.  The downside is that the helmet takes up a lot of room, and I can't easily reach anything below it.  My ski pack has a side-zipper though, so I can access the bottom using that.

Other times, when my pack is full, I just strap it to the outside and let it dangle.  I use my downhill helmet when ski-touring, as I only plan on wearing it downhill.  I don't wear it uphill as it is too warm and there really isn't a need.  As for it filling with snow, if it is snowing, I wrap it in a stuff sack.

If my tour is more climbing-oriented where I want to wear the helmet going up, then I use my rock climbing helmet which is very light and lots of ventilation.  I don't trust it as much for a downhill crash, but it should work.
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