Forum Index > Trail Talk > Another Smoky Summer
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Doppelganger
Gorecrow



Joined: 09 Feb 2006
Posts: 1578 | TRs
Location: Pessimising
Doppelganger
  Top

Gorecrow
PostFri May 10, 2019 7:54 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat wrote:
I submit the fact that...correlation is not causation.

Well we're at the top of the figurative roller coaster's hill at this point. Let's see where the fingers are pointing in another decade, we should be through the first loop by then.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Jordan
y



Joined: 22 Feb 2008
Posts: 402 | TRs
Location: shoreline
Jordan
  Top

y
PostWed May 15, 2019 12:45 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Its only been two summers now that smoke has had an effect on the west side of the mountains.  With the summer before last being not too bad.  Last summer was bad, I'll give you that, but it does not mean we are headed for another like it.  There will always be wildfires, just depends on which way the wind is blowing.  I'll be hiking in August.  Stay indoors if you like, more privacy for me on the trail.

--------------
none
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5511 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostTue Jun 04, 2019 9:53 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Only four days into June and

Quote:
Grant County residents flee fast-growing wildfire
Several hundred residents of Grant County have been told to evacuate because of a fast-moving wildfire that grew overnight to more than 3,500 acres and then spread another 500 acres by mid-Tuesday. Officials don't believe it will be contained within the next few days.

This is after the Alberta wildfires
wikipedia wrote:
The 2019 Alberta wildfires were described by NASA as part of an extreme fire season in the province.[7] From March 1, when the wildfire season begins, until May 31, there had been an "historic" level of hectares burned—496,739.19 or 4,967.4 km2 (1,227,500 acres),[8][9][10] which is over 3.5 times more land burned that in the five-year average amount of hectares burned.[11] This increased to 528,842.99 hectare or 5,288.4299 km2 (1,306,799.5 acres) by June 1.[12] From March 1 to May 30, there have been 502 wildfires recorded in Alberta.[13][9] By May 31, 10,000 people had been evacuated, 16 homes,[5] and the Steen River CN railway bridge, had been destroyed.

The Alberta wildfires have been responsible for much of the haze in the Puget Sound area the past week.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
rossb
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Sep 2002
Posts: 1248 | TRs

rossb
  Top

Member
PostTue Jun 04, 2019 10:19 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm pretty sure that fires in Alberta in May are normal. To quote Cliff Mass:

Quote:
Having big Alberta fires in May is not unusual.  Many of you might remember the huge Fort Murray wildfire that started on May 1, 2016 or the May 2011 Slave Lake fire.

If I'm not mistaken, the small (but growing) fire in Eastern Washington is happening in sagebrush and grasslands. I would guess fire in May or June for that type of terrain is fairly normal as well (but I'm no expert, someone could correct me). Now if we had a big fire in the Cascades this time of year, that would be weird.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
jinx'sboy
Member
Member


Joined: 30 Jul 2008
Posts: 492 | TRs
Location: on a great circle route
jinx'sboy
  Top

Member
PostTue Jun 04, 2019 10:19 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
The monthly fire behavior prediction outlook for the NW, for the rest of the summer, came out just yesterday.  It doesn’t look good.

https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/content/products/fwx/MonthlySeasonal.pdf

Look at the snopack (SWE) charts.  Or the drought charts.  At the bottom are the predictive charts for the rest of the summer.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Gil
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 3762 | TRs

Gil
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 6:03 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Better to be prepared for fire season, wouldn't you say?

--------------
Friends help the miles go easier.
Klahini
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5199 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 6:25 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Current status in Alberta: Alberta Wildfire Service

It also does not look like a good situation looking forward for SE Alaska, BC, Alberta, or Washington and Oregon - the drought continues. Long lead discussion:

https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/fxus07.html
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey
Member
Member


Joined: 04 Sep 2003
Posts: 720 | TRs
Location: SW Washington
Mikey
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 6:38 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I suspect the increase in Western Washington smokey air is partially caused by the Govt decision to let remote fires burn such as they did during the 2018 summer with that fire in the Olympic Nat. Park or Forest.  Too many of the Eastern Washington fires are man-made caused which I suspect is the cause of the present "wildfire" which started east of Wanapum dam on the Columbia and has now spread east.  That fire is primarily in sagebrush yet a UW Tacoma professor was on TV saying that such fires are more common because of the lack of removing underbrush and that present fire east of the Columbia river has little to do with underbrush. I observe too many people disposing of cigarettes while driving and the fires along I-5 are examples of this problem.  Probably there should be a new name for man-made forest fires which would communicate that because "wildfire" might imply the fire was started naturally, like from lightning.  Perhaps something as simple as "Man-Made Wildfire" and "Lightning Wildfire" would communicate better how the fire started so the pubic could be better informed. There was a fire ignited by contractors working on bridge repair in the CleElum area and that fire spread north to burn a large area.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5199 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 6:44 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb wrote:
Current status in Alberta: Alberta Wildfire Service

It also does not look like a good situation looking forward for SE Alaska, BC, Alberta, or Washington and Oregon - the drought continues. Long lead discussion:

https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/fxus07.html

Statistics show 90% of US wildfires are human caused, whereas in BC that number is just 50%.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5511 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 8:15 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
rossb wrote:
I'm pretty sure that fires in Alberta in May are normal.

True that May is their fire season but "extreme fire season" and "historic level of hectares burned"..."3.5 times more land burned that in the five-year average"
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
drm
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Posts: 1311 | TRs
Location: The Dalles, OR
drm
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 9:16 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey wrote:
I suspect the increase in Western Washington smokey air is partially caused by the Govt decision to let remote fires burn such as they did during the 2018 summer with that fire in the Olympic Nat. Park or Forest. 

There is also the issue of prescribed burns, which are most controversial due to the smoke created. But my guess would be that even adding prescribed and non-suppressed fires is a small percentage compared to what comes from fires in general.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey
Member
Member


Joined: 04 Sep 2003
Posts: 720 | TRs
Location: SW Washington
Mikey
  Top

Member
PostWed Jun 05, 2019 9:38 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
With regards to prescribed burns, the Crown Zellarbach Corporation (later named James River) did not conduct slash burning on their forest lands after logging.  At forestry meetings such as were held by the Northwest Pulp & Paper Assoc. and the National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, the Crown Zellarbach speakers explained that it was to their economic advantage to remove (harvest) all the tree material which they used to make pulp and the waste was used in their hog fuel boilers.  There was a myth that slash burning (ie prescribed burning) was required to make the soil better for growing seddling trees (mostly Douglas fir) planted in the logged off area.  Some forestry graduate student studied this and found that in fact burning the forest slash removed important organic materials in the soil and some bacteria or fungii attacked the Douglas fir seedlings, harming their growth.  I forget who funded this graduate students research project, but the funding had been provided to show that slash burning improved the growth of Douglas fir seedlings.  The research project funds were ended.  Former Oregon State University Professor of Mechanical Engineering Dick Boubel used to tell stories about the prescribed burn myths.  The burning of field straw used to be common in Oregon and Washington and periodically the field burning smoke would blow across nearby highways and once the smoke blew across I-5 in Oregon near Murder Creek and caused many accidents (later some people thought Murder Creek was named after the people hurt and killed in the smoke caused accidents on I-5 but the Murder Creek name came from some other incident).
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
treeswarper
Alleged Sockpuppet!



Joined: 25 Dec 2006
Posts: 8996 | TRs
Location: Don't move here
treeswarper
  Top

Alleged Sockpuppet!
PostSat Jun 08, 2019 7:15 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I took part in a few broadcast burns on the westside of the state.  At that time, old growth was still being cut.  There was no use for the slash.  It had to be burned because it was pretty much impossible to plant seedlings through it.  We would be walking on top of slash and I saw a 6 foot coworker make a mis step and disappear through the slash. He was OK and we laughed about it. Can't plant through that stuff.

The cull logs which had been left in the units would not burn completely, and that was OK.  We needed to get "planting holes" made for reforestation.  That was the intent of the burns.   

At the same time, I went with an engine to a fire just out of Enumclaw.  It burned through the checkerboard land ownership.  Weyco?  had harvested second growth and had not done any burning.   The wildfire did and fried their seedlings. 

Tree farms are a risky business.

--------------
What's especially fun about sock puppets is that you can make each one unique and individual, so that they each have special characters. And they don't have to be human––animals and aliens are great possibilities
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
cdestroyer
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Sep 2015
Posts: 410 | TRs
Location: montana
cdestroyer
  Top

Member
PostSat Jun 08, 2019 7:46 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I dont know if tree farms are risky or not. Simpsons over by Shelton seems to be doing okay...
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5511 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostSat Jun 08, 2019 10:01 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
In today's Herald:

Editorial: Haze has returned, and with it a wildfire warning

Quote:
Already, the DNR, which leads the state’s wildfire response, has fought more than 50 fires in the state; all but one was in Western Washington, the Skagit Valley Herald reported last month.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > Another Smoky Summer
  Happy Birthday outdoorgirl, wildernessed!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy