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Snowbrushy
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PostSun Oct 25, 2015 7:01 am 
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Since the mountain man days there's been a keen interest in the fur bearing critters around Lakes Payette and Cascade, Idaho. And other places. Most animals had been trapped out and furs traded or sold to the HBC before the settlement period, after the Indian Wars. This is an interesting article and video containing historic film footage from the modern period when the fur bearing animals were re-introduced to the primitive areas. Muskrat, Martin, and a successful scheme to parachute beaver into the backcountry.
http://arstechnica.com/science/2015/10/newly-discovered-1950s-film-shows-idaho-fish-and-games-parachuting-beavers/

-Fort_Hall_
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Bernardo
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PostSun Oct 25, 2015 2:43 pm 
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Interesting to see the Fish & Wildlife guys handling live animals without gloves.
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Pyrites
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PostSun Oct 25, 2015 6:25 pm 
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Yes, the no gloves was a bit much.

Was the initial sweep of trapping so effective that drainages were bereft of beavers?
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Humptulips
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PostSun Oct 25, 2015 8:07 pm 
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Pyrites wrote:
Yes, the no gloves was a bit much.

Was the initial sweep of trapping so effective that drainages were bereft of beavers?

Yes it was. Of course their was a big demand for beaver in the early 1800s but there was also political reasons why beaver were trapped so hard. HBC was trying to keep the Americans out. By wiping the beaver out they hoped to stop the free trappers (trailblazers).

I did not really understand the marten and especially the muskrat relocations. I don't think there was ever a place where they were in need of this.
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Ski
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PostSun Oct 25, 2015 8:35 pm 
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Pyrites wrote:
"Was the initial sweep of trapping so effective that drainages were bereft of beavers?"

Yes. Actually it was the "North West Company", not the Hudson's Bay Company, and it was done under the auspices of the British Crown to discourage settlement of what is now Washington, Oregon, and Idaho by "the Americans", the rationale being that the only thing of any value around here was fur, and if they trapped out every drainage nobody would want the area.
Guess it didn't occur to them that people might want timber or good bottomland for farming. wink.gif

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Humptulips
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PostMon Oct 26, 2015 12:12 pm 
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Ski wrote:
Pyrites wrote:
"Was the initial sweep of trapping so effective that drainages were bereft of beavers?"

Yes. Actually it was the "North West Company", not the Hudson's Bay Company, and it was done under the auspices of the British Crown to discourage settlement of what is now Washington, Oregon, and Idaho by "the Americans", the rationale being that the only thing of any value around here was fur, and if they trapped out every drainage nobody would want the area.
Guess it didn't occur to them that people might want timber or good bottomland for farming. wink.gif

I believe it was both. North West Company from 1807 to 1821 and HBC from 1821 to 1846.
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Snowbrushy
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PostMon Oct 26, 2015 10:10 pm 
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Humptulips wrote:
in the early 1800s but there was also political reasons why beaver were trapped so hard. HBC was trying to keep the Americans out. By wiping the beaver out they hoped to stop the free trappers (trailblazers).

At some point there had been a "joint occupation" by the US and GB. The NW border between the two countries was to be decided by a European king or court. Still, there was fierce competition for fur, with the English having already set up a smart business model back east on the St. Lawrence river, etc., and running off the French trappers there. Their secrecy was key to the model. They did the same thing in the Columbia District, as it was called. They got to the remote areas first and they trapped everything out. Everything with fur! The American fur trappers around the Rocky Mountains did the same.

When the American wagon trains started to roll into the Oregon Country the big industrial strength fur business was starting to wane. This was a settlement period involving farmers and not trappers. There is a difference for the sake of the history. The farmers are civilians and not a part of the fur business.

The British tried in vain to advertise in the greater London area to bring their citizens to the NW offering 160 acres and stock and farm tools in the Cowlitz bottom land where they begun a huge farm under lucrative contract to provision the Russian settlements up north, but for some reason the English citizens wouldn't immigrate here and settle. (Someone wrote that it was because of inadequate advertising).

To be fair, The Hudsons Bay Company was very gracious, generous, and even protective of the new settler farmers from the United States on both sides of the Columbia river around Vancouver/Portland.

The HBC in Victoria, BC. 1950's Retail Business.
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mountainsandsound
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PostTue Oct 27, 2015 6:57 am 
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Pyrites wrote:
Yes, the no gloves was a bit much.

I've always thought it was strange that beavers or rabbits, presumably able to take a human finger off with a quick nibble, do not bite in self defense.
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coldrain108
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PostTue Oct 27, 2015 12:47 pm 
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IanB
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PostTue Oct 27, 2015 1:15 pm 
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I'd been thinking that Snowbrushy's thread title would make an excellent name for a band - and now there's even cover art for their first album.   up.gif  up.gif

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Pyrites
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PostFri Sep 13, 2019 9:26 pm 
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More beavers. They trapped the last beaver out of the U.K. a few centuries ago.

Both unlicensed and sanctioned introductions have occurred in Scotland, England, and Cornwall. Scotland has ended the trials and said go at it. As far as I can tell population there is something under 200.

In SW England the fenced tiny population has been studied by a wide range of disciplines.

A nice pamphlet. I liked best the detailed maps of the dams from year to year.

Best.

https://tinyurl.com/Devon-Beaver

or

https://www.devonwildlifetrust.org/sites/default/files/2018-01/Beaver%20Project%20update%20%28LowRes%29%20.pdf
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Pyrites
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PostWed Sep 18, 2019 10:16 pm 
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Scottish beavers. Weve all seen trees cut down by beavers. Weve also heard beavers are sometimes killed by the tree.

Ive never seen beavers drop a tree. See from 2:00 to about 2:15 on this YouTube. The tree drops, and the beaver bugs out, safely, if a little late.

Best.

https://tinyurl.com/beaverdroppingtree

or

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