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Cyclopath
Faster than light



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PostFri Aug 16, 2019 9:22 pm 
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Grannyhiker wrote:
Pahoehoe has it right.  This is part of the basic puppy training for all service dogs.  Hysson came from Canine Companions for Independence and his breeder/caretaker had already started the training.  You keep saying "hurry" and when he pees or poops, you praise elaborately, saying "GOOD HURRY!"

I say "show me the money" when I want them to poop.
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Brushwork
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PostSun Aug 18, 2019 2:34 am 
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Cyclopath wrote:
Grannyhiker wrote:
Pahoehoe has it right.  This is part of the basic puppy training for all service dogs.  Hysson came from Canine Companions for Independence and his breeder/caretaker had already started the training.  You keep saying "hurry" and when he pees or poops, you praise elaborately, saying "GOOD HURRY!"

I say "show me the money" when I want them to poop.

Hilarious! 

Re: throwing poop,   It is still there for someone to step in.  You can guess how I know.   

Thank you HikerJohn/ ranger for input.

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bradmbaldwin
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PostWed Aug 28, 2019 7:43 pm 
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Wish people had to pick up after their horses like they do with dogs. I understand horse poop is “cleaner” but I just spent the last 1.5months around alpine lakes wilderness and some of those trails were disgusting, just completely littered with horse sh##.
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wolffie
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PostWed Aug 28, 2019 10:37 pm 
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Good thing my dog’s ship don’t stink. Really— he’s on a raw meat diet, and except when he’s been eating kibble or scavenging fallen fruit, his turds are nearly odorless, also quite small, and firm, not squishy, pleasingly shaped, and taste good (at least, he likes ‘em — the little son of a bitch eats them occasionally).
Buried or not, his fecal footprint is a lot smaller than mine.  Good thing mine don’t stink, neither.
😂

It has come to this... I am a connoisseur of dog siht...
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Downhill
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PostSat Sep 07, 2019 10:09 pm 
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HikerJohn wrote:
As a USFS Ranger, I actually can provide some intelligent input here!:
- In not heavily travelled/wooded areas, get fido to pull off the trail and do his/her "dump"-- then fling it or bury it.
- In heavily travelled areas, do what you would do with human waste:  put it in the  wilderness toilet or trailhead toilet (assuming you are using those bio-degradable bags)
- In Alpine Areas, bag it and take it out (even if you wouldn't do that for your own waste).  Places like Snow Lake we are having trouble with dealing with the amount of waste generated (having to move toilets regularly) so we don't need Fido's extra (however small) in the toilets.

Please, Please, PLEASE don't bag it and leave it by the side of the trail, with good intentions to "pick it up on the way back".  Some people actually do that, but more don't and then I have to pick it up and haul it out.... GRRRRR


Good advise John - thanks for your input!

Personally, I am much less put off by dog people, dogs and dog poop in the mountains than I am by horses.  I find it curious and a little silly that so much concern is generated by dog poop, when there seems to be very little agitation about horse manure on wilderness trails.  Their waste is always in the middle of the trail, smelly, and hatching flies.  Why aren't there calls for hoseback riders to dismount, scoop, bag, remount, and carry-out manue during each trip?  Compared to dogs, horse manue impact is many orders of magnitude greater.

As long as people don't leave dog bags (basic littering) along the trail, I won't lose any sleep over dogs in the wilderness.  On the other hand, I'd give my life savings to see a horseback rider dismount and pack out their mount's waste.
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Anne Elk
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PostSat Sep 07, 2019 10:27 pm 
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wolffie wrote:
...he’s on a raw meat diet

You've got Al on the BARF diet?  (Bones And Raw Food)  I house- and dog-sat once for friends up the Mtn Loop whose 3 large dogs were on that routine.  They had a fridge in their basement just for the dog food - a case of turkey necks, chicken parts, etc. It was quite the production and made me a little ill.

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"There are yahoos out there.  It’s why we can’t have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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mosey
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PostSat Sep 07, 2019 10:28 pm 
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@downhill I don't have any sources for this, but I'd imagine that because it's mostly grasses it breaks down faster, whereas dog poop has all of the nasty stuff from breaking down proteins and fats, along with parasites dogs get from licking everything.

Horse poop is annoying but it doesn't have any health risks afaik. Even E. coli dies pretty fast in sunlight.
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kbatku
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PostSat Sep 07, 2019 11:27 pm 
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Horse poop.

It bothered me for years.

I hiked the same trail for practice and recreation (North Fork Tieton) and would walk by the SAME horse shite from the day it was fresh and covered with flies until it had been ground down to dust.  It would peeve me to no end, walking by that familiar poo, cursing under my breath.

Until one day it dawned on me: Why doesn't somebody do something about it?  Then it dawned on me: Somebody is ME.

So now, when I see some horse poop on the trail I kick it (if the texture it right) off the trail. If it's still gooshy (rate) I find a stick (the woods are full of them) and move it off the trail. It only takes a minute, and I never have to scowl at that piece of horse poop again. Neither does anyone else.

A little cooperation, a little coordination, and a tiny bit of effort make the world a better place for everyone. smile.gif
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kbatku
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PostSat Sep 07, 2019 11:39 pm 
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My dog poop story:

A few years ago I was heading south on the PCT from White Pass.  I was handing out peaches to the PCT hikers and had my dog along.  I didn't have any plastic bags for her poop as my normal practice was to have her poop off in the brush somewhere or to bury her poop.

She's all excited of course as we set out, and we make it maybe a hundred yards down the trail when she stops dead in her tracks and takes a MASSIVE diarrhea dump RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TRAIL.

Huge, like three gallons.

I think crap, what do I do?

So I go in my pack and dig out a bunch of paper towels (for the hiker's sticky hands after eating the peaches) and scoop up the poo the best I can, ending up with a gigantic wad of stinky poo covered paper towels.

Now what?

So I look around and a bit off the trail in the brush I find a hollow log to stuff the towels in, planning to retrieve them (somehow) on my return.

So I set about my day, handing out peaches (after washing and sanitizing my hands thoroughly) and happy as a clam return to the hollow log on the way out, intent on retrieving my shameful mess.

It was gone.

What happened to it??

I'll never know, but I speculate that the severe odor caused some overly curious person to seek out the source, and finding it, in their horror they took it upon themselves to clean it up.

Many thanks, whoever.  Sorry I spoiled your day.  I bet you got a hell of a story out of it thogh, didn't you?
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