Forum Index > Gear Talk > Keepin' Your Feet Dry
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Songs2
Member
Member


Joined: 21 Mar 2016
Posts: 59 | TRs

Songs2
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:35 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox, then insert feet into wet boots.
For feet of my size, the free bags various parks provide for dog poop are perfect.

Carrying a small tube of antifungal cream and applying it after drying the feet at night could also help podiatric health.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5544 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:37 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Songs2 wrote:
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox

The Stephenson solution - assuming you never sweat. I've tried this once and I'd never subject my feet to it again.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Damian
Member
Member


Joined: 18 Dec 2001
Posts: 3094 | TRs

Damian
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:53 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder wrote:
Are you sure the water is coming in through your boots and not being wicked down from your clothing and socks?

100% sure.  I've done the rain pants, gaiter, plastic bag stuff.  If the water finds it's way to the leather it will find my feet though it may take hours of exposure.  I'm talking hours if not days of exposure to wet bushes/brush.  Gaiters typically leave some leather exposed.  Water is sneaky stuff.

Again, the only success I have had, and it has been 100%, are boots with rubber that comes up relatively high before meeting the leather.  That along with gaiters or boots.  Maybe this is the only solution for tough conditions.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
joker
seeker



Joined: 12 Aug 2006
Posts: 7705 | TRs
Location: state of confusion
joker
  Top

seeker
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 11:16 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
iron wrote:
quick drying tennis shoes.

This was more or less the approach the  US Army took when designing the Vietnam era combat boot, which was had porous sides, leather treated more for preventing rot than water intrusion, and they also had two metal  drain holes in the instep area. I.e. a boot that  would  dry  quickly  after getting  wet versus the GTX boot approach, which yields a boot that pretty much  NEVER dries out in the field once the water has intruded, which it always will in truly  miserable conditions. But the Vietnam boot strategy may be good for hot jungles or warm trips in the  desert Southwest or even up  here in summer, but is not as fully awesome in hypothermia weather.

The only boots I've every used that  truly keep water out have  rubber going  a fair  ways up - i.e. LL Bean "Main Hunting Shoes" (i.e. "Bean boots") or Sorells. But these aren't great *hiking* boots and that  same waterproofness guarantees that  all my foot sweat will stay inside the boot when exerting  (yes, vapor barrier socks can help  here, particularly in colder weather but are still not a perfect solution for  all wet conditions and situations).
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
RandyHiker
Snarky Member



Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 6614 | TRs
Location: Bellevue at the moment.
RandyHiker
  Top

Snarky Member
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 12:09 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder wrote:
Songs2 wrote:
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox

The Stephenson solution - assuming you never sweat. I've tried this once and I'd never subject my feet to it again.

The vapor barrier approach works better when an additional barrier is worn next to skin and antiperspirant spray is applied to the feet every few days.

On multi-day snow camping trips with plastic boots and thermofit liners -- this approach is useful since those boots and liners are vapor barriers already and drying socks overnight while snow camping isn't particularly effective.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
joker
seeker



Joined: 12 Aug 2006
Posts: 7705 | TRs
Location: state of confusion
joker
  Top

seeker
PostThu Sep 26, 2019 11:32 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Yeah, what I've done for cold overnighters is a thin liner sock against skin, then the VBL, then the warmer insulating sock layer. In cold weather, the liner sock has never been more than damp, and my feet sweat like crazy in general. So I think Stephenson's notions about vapor pressure etc have some validity (I.e. that  once a certain vapor pressure is reached, the  sweat rate slows or stops). And unlike thick wool socks, a thin synthetic liner sock dries relatively quickly - such as in an inside torso pocket under some warm layers while hanging out and having dinner.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 3269 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostSat Sep 28, 2019 7:42 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I've been a wool guy for more than a decade, but this summer I tried coolmax socks and turned been working well for me.  I'm sure they aren't a 100% solution or even close, but a step in the right direction is better than not.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
HikerJohn
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2008
Posts: 207 | TRs
Location: Daydreaming
HikerJohn
  Top

Member
PostSun Oct 06, 2019 6:01 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm with you: I'm tired of the Goretex "waterproof" adverts and spending a lot of money on boots that shortly after you buy them, will leave you with wet feet.
It's not wicking down my socks, or running down my legs-- I can feel it creeping in from the seams.
Most recent attempt was a set of pretty Mammut Ayako boots that have hiked well for a year, but recently are leaking like a sieve.

Thinking about going back to all-leather uppers and SnoSeal..

Any recommendations??
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((>



Joined: 27 May 2005
Posts: 10053 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
  Top

><((((>
PostMon Oct 07, 2019 9:26 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Chief Joseph wrote:
All leather boots treated with Obenaufs and wear Gaiters.

^ this. up.gif

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Gear Talk > Keepin' Your Feet Dry
  Happy Birthday roos2er!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy