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BigBrunyon
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PostTue Oct 15, 2019 9:04 pm 
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Looks like they're holding off on any plans to release in the upper drainages off the west side of mainstem thunder up south cross valley from the gain past the gizzly drainage coming down off Fisher easy vicinities

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i ALWAYS camp at the upper lake!
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Doppelganger
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PostWed Oct 16, 2019 6:46 am 
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some name wrote:
when I look at Fig. 1 (Area Of Analysis) on pg. 2 of the EIS, and read the text of the EIS document, it seems that the actual planned recovery area is much more and much larger than the NCNP itself, and includes all of the area identified as the North Cascades Ecosystem (NCE). This is the area outlined in black on Fig. 1, and appears to include pretty much all federal land north of I-90, and extending some into BC. Am I reading this correctly? Is the plan to add bears to the NCNP area only? Or is it to restore a significant Grizzly population to the entire NCE? Could someone please clarify this?

More importantly, has anyone discussed this map with the bears and made it absolutely clear to them which lines are important, and which lines are not important? Do we have their tacit agreement recorded for posterity and liability going forward?

What a circus.
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Ski
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PostWed Oct 16, 2019 5:36 pm 
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Wednesday October 16, 2019 17:03 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW officials offer five tips for living with bears this fall


Fall is here, and Washington's black bears are stocking up fat reserves for winter hibernation. Black bears are opportunistic when it comes to finding food and tend to select foods with the highest number of calories, which can bring them into proximity with people.

Officials concede that watching a bear can be an awe-inspiring experience, but warn residents to avoid attracting them to their homes.

"Do everything you can to avoid an encounter with any bear, which help to keep them, and you, out of harm's way," said Rich Beausoleil, WDFW statewide bear and cougar specialist. "Following these simple steps can prevent virtually all black bear and other wildlife issues."

Follow these five tips to avoid negative bear interactions this fall:

1. Always store garbage cans in a garage or sturdy building until collection day. Bears are smart and opportunistic. If a garbage can is left out, they'll find it. So, put garbage out the morning of collection, not the night before.

2. Remove bird feeders (seed and liquid) from porches, trees, and other accessible areas, and feed pets inside. These feeders can inadvertently become easy, high-calorie attractants for bears. If they find it, they may come back, which will begin to pose a problem.

3. Pick and remove fruit from trees, even the highest branches. Bears love fruit and may climb trees to get it, possibly damaging valuable branches. Also remove fallen fruit, which can also pose an accidental lure for bears.

4. Don't intentionally feed bears, deer, elk other wild animals. Bears have great memories, so once they find food, they'll likely return having begun to associate food with people. Anything a deer or elk will eat, a bear will eat too, even near homes. Once bears learn to connect people with food, it starts to puts the bear, and the public, at risk.

5. Don't wait until you have a bear problem. If people wait until a bear is seen, it may be too late to prevent a negative outcome. Taking these steps before a situation occurs is the best way to prevent negative interactions with wildlife.

A bear's natural diet consists of items such as blueberries (256 calories) or huckleberries (166 calories). Access to excessively high calorie foods, such as garbage, birdseed (1,750 calories), and hummingbird feeder fluids (3,200 calories), may delay a bear's natural hibernation patterns. This is another important reason to remove such items.

If you have tried the recommendations listed above and are still experiencing a bear problem please call (360) 903-2936 to report to WDFW enforcement officers. In an emergency, call 911.

People can find more information about how to avoid conflict with bears at wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/species/ursus-americanus. Please contact your regional office at wdfw.wa.gov/about/regional-offices if you have questions regarding living with bears.

-WDFW-

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Kim Brown
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PostThu Oct 17, 2019 12:34 pm 
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some name wrote:
when I look at Fig. 1 (Area Of Analysis) on pg. 2 of the EIS, and read the text of the EIS document, it seems that the actual planned recovery area is much more and much larger than the NCNP itself, and includes all of the area identified as the North Cascades Ecosystem (NCE). This is the area outlined in black on Fig. 1, and appears to include pretty much all federal land north of I-90, and extending some into BC. Am I reading this correctly? Is the plan to add bears to the NCNP area only? Or is it to restore a significant Grizzly population to the entire NCE? Could someone please clarify this?

The current project is a resurrection of an older project that was analyzed in the 1980s, and wasn't funded. It is part of an interagency collaboration, from which the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee was formed. The areas targeted are in MT, WA, ID, and WY.

So while the area in WA is indeed more than NCNP, the NCNP was targeted because the suitable habitat is already there, and I suspect, but not sure, that the particular bears that would have the best success can be obtained from like ecosystems (for food, shelter, other habits) and have like biological patterns (breeding, hibernation). When the fisher was reintroduced recently, the same considerations were made for obtaining those animals.

Reintroducing in the entire area targeted is too much to bite off; too expensive, and they're not even sure it's going to work. Chip away at it.

The grizzly recovery plan public Open Houses held about 5 years ago drew large audiences; I think up to 500 people attended the one in Seattle. (I might be wrong about how many hundreds, but I do know that it was in the hundreds).

It's cool that people are still interested; but it is disheartening when there's a lot of interest, and the projects die due to lack of funding. It's sorta turns the public off of participation. frown.gif

There's another thread on this subject, which might give more information not discussed on this thread.

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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bk
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PostWed Oct 23, 2019 7:23 pm 
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There's about 24 hours left to share your preference on the speed and effort of gov't-coordinated grizzly bear reintroduction to the North Cascades.

Comment period concludes Thurs. at 10:59 PM (11 PM) Seattle time.
. . . that's 11:59 PM Mountain Time...which is basically midnight Mountain Time. Mountain Time is one-hour different than Seattle . . .

"Comment Now" link.

Wasn't there also a link for a US mail option postmarked no later than the 24th?
- - - -
earlier discussions:
Mon Sep 16, 2019: Stewardship > North Cascade Grizzly Recovery
Thu Jan 12, 2017: Trail Talk > grizzly bears in north cascades - open house / public comment
Mon Dec 07, 2015: Stewardship > Grizzly Bear Delisting From Endangered Species List
Mon Jun 30, 2014: Trail Talk > Grizzly bears in Washington.. what the?
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zephyr
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aka friendly hiker
PostThu Oct 24, 2019 7:41 pm 
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Bear comments are closing in 3 hours or so.  Now's your chance.  ~z
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