Forum Index > Trail Talk > What's your favorite kind of tree?
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Bootpathguy
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PostThu Oct 03, 2019 7:46 am 
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Cyclopath wrote:
Ponderosa pines are like giant red jigsaw puzzles.  Their forests are more open, almost stately, with lovely grass below.  Quaking aspens,

Nothing like these 2 species together. Especially this time of year as the Aspen is in it's beautiful fall color. Here in the Teanaway there are many Quaking Aspen groves nestled into, and surrounded by Ponderosa Pine Forest. So beautiful!

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GaliWalker
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PostThu Oct 03, 2019 9:13 am 
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I'm partial to trees with white trunks - aspen, white birch, etc. - because these look great in fall when the turning foliage gets highlighted ever more.

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thunderhead
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PostThu Oct 03, 2019 9:34 am 
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Definitely ponderosa!
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Ski
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PostThu Oct 03, 2019 9:41 am 
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GaliWalker wrote:
"...trees with white trunks..."

You should consider the possibility of hauling your camera out to the west side of the Olympic Peninsula, where a lichen infects the bark of the Red Alder (Alnus Rubra) and turns it snowy white.
Most of the alder leaves are on the ground out there now - they start turning brown and dropping in late summer - around mid-August - and early storms like we've had this season will strip them pretty quickly, but the white trunks and branches in front of dark green spruce and hemlock stands are pretty impressive.


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JVesquire
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PostThu Oct 03, 2019 9:44 am 
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In Minnesota: I could sit and watch and listen to a Quaking Aspen in the wind all day long.

In Washington, Whitebark Pine. So cute.
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treeswarper
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PostFri Oct 04, 2019 5:53 am 
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Malachai Constant wrote:
Strange no one mentioned cottonwood clown.gif

Cottonwood kills.

Actually, it does try hard to kill folks.  Those branches tend to break off when there is a gloppy, heavy snowfall.  Sometimes the whole tree tips over from snowload.

Drive, or try to, the lower 25 road south of Randle after a snowfall.  Take a saw and a choker along.

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Doppelganger
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PostFri Oct 04, 2019 6:07 am 
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Lots of fond memories of the madronas in the San Juan islands, their prevalence helped make the islands feel separate from the mainland, walking through stands of madronas popping out of the rocky headlands with little groundcover always felt unusual and beautiful when I was a kid.
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veronika
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PostFri Oct 04, 2019 8:12 pm 
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Manzanita

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Brushwork
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PostFri Oct 04, 2019 8:15 pm 
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Ok, now isn’t Manzanita a shrub?    I know it’s really fun to hike through....,,

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Songs2
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PostFri Oct 04, 2019 8:31 pm 
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What are the dead trees piled up on Rialto Beach?

As a displaced New Englander, I found all the new (to me) species in Inland Northwest and Pacific Northwest quite wonderful. (But no sugar maples!)
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Pyrites
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PostSat Oct 05, 2019 12:40 pm 
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Favourite trees?

Big Ones.

The only tree type I spread around? Oregon White Oaks, or Garry if you prefer. Got a bag of acorns to plant tomorrow.

Best.
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RumiDude
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PostSat Oct 05, 2019 1:04 pm 
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This time of year I like cottonwood trees dressed out in golden leaves.

Rumi

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Celticclimber
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PostSat Oct 05, 2019 1:13 pm 
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Western Red Cedar.
I even have a tattoo, which in part, is made up with the leaves on my chest.
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Sculpin
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PostSat Oct 05, 2019 1:59 pm 
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My favorite tree was - past tense - an immense and gorgeous Juniperus scopulorum, nee "Rocky Mountain Juniper," that grew near the confluence of the two forks of Tarpiscan Creek in the Colockum.  Tragically, it burned to ashes in the Great Colockum Fire of 2014.   frown.gif

A few J. scopulorum still persist as relicts within a stone's throw of the Columbia River south of Wenatchee, but you kind of have to know where to look.  There are still plenty of them at Juniper Dunes. 

The junipers of the San Juan Islands have been reclassified as J. maritima.

Anybody ever find our native Hackberry?

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Gwen
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PostSat Oct 05, 2019 2:24 pm 
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Bedivere wrote:
Western red cedar is by far my favorite. I love the fibrous bark and the gnarled forms ancient specimens take.  I love the way the wood smells when cut.  I love the clear, even grain and the soft feel of the raw wood. I love how seasoned logs seemingly jump apart when split. I love the crackly fires they make.  I love how they can grow right out of a river bank, seemingly right out of the water.

I also like paper Birch and Vine Maple when it grows in open areas under dense canopies.

I love this description! Not just a name on a list, but all the reasons why! And so we'll written. I can see, smell, feel, even hear the tree.

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Tomorrow's not promised to anyone, so be bold, scare yourself, attempt something with no guarantee of success. You'll be amazed at what you can achieve. -Olive McGloin
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Forum Index > Trail Talk > What's your favorite kind of tree?
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