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Ravenridge22
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PostSun Oct 13, 2019 4:56 pm 
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Poaching violations added: Sequim man faces 26 counts now

PORT ANGELES — A Sequim man who was charged with 16 illegal hunting violations last month in Clallam County and two counts in Jefferson County is facing eight new counts in Clallam County Superior Court.

Jason Bradley Hutt, 29, will be arraigned Thursday on two counts of first-degree unlawful hunting of big game, three counts of second-degree hunting of wild animals or wild birds, two counts of unlawful possession of a loaded firearm and one count of unlawful carrying of a firearm.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife alleged that Hutt and an accomplice — Wyatt James Beck — illegally killed several bears, deer and elk in Clallam and Jefferson counties in 2018.

The new charges against Hutt stem from the Aug. 30 discovery of an illegally-hunted or illegally-possessed river otter pelt, bobcat pelt and harlequin duck carcass that were found at Hutt’s residence, Fish and Wildlife Sgt. Kit Rosenberger said Friday.

https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/poaching-violations-added-sequim-man-faces-26-counts-now/
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PostSun Oct 13, 2019 6:12 pm 
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Rob Ollikainen, reporting for the Peninsula Daily News in the above-cited article wrote:
Hutt also is charged with possession of methamphetamine in a third case and first-degree theft of an excavator and possession of stolen property in a fourth case in Clallam County Superior Court.

So... did they confiscate all of his weapons and all of the trophies?

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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ale_capone
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PostMon Oct 14, 2019 3:44 am 
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All pelts and parts will be confiscated if you cant provide proof they arent illegal. If he gets convicted of any felonies, he has to give up all his guns. Surprised This guy was not part of the "kill em all boyz"?

http://www.chronline.com/news/first-suspect-in-massive-poaching-case-pleads-guilty-hit-with/article_b7e2a342-d9ee-11e7-988b-a358cf0fc8eb.html

A coworker of mine got caught illegally baiting black bear.  It was on the wfr reality show. They suspended his hunting privileges for a year, and big fines. Not a felony, so he gets to keep his guns.
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PostWed Feb 19, 2020 4:47 pm 
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Wednesday February 19, 2020 14:06 PT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW Police arrest alleged repeat big-game poacher in Clallam County


OLYMPIA – Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Police Officers, along with Clallam County Sheriff deputies, and members of the Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team have arrested a man charged with 26 big-game poaching-related crimes.

Jason Bradley Hutt failed to appear for his court hearings regarding a yearlong WDFW Police investigation into the alleged poaching of a wide range of wildlife across the North Olympic Peninsula. On Jan. 16, 2020, the Clallam County Superior Court issued three felony bench warrants for Hutt. WDFW Officers booked Hutt for these warrants, and he is currently being held in the Clallam County jail on $60,000 bail.

Hutt, and his accomplice Wyatt J. Beck had been charged in Jefferson and Clallam Counties with a combined total of 44 criminal violations which occurred from the summer of 2018 to the summer of 2019.

Hutt had been on the run after failing to appear for a court hearing related to this case. In addition to the previously named crimes, Hutt is now charged with felony bail jumping.

“The public is often instrumental in giving us the ability to catch criminals,” said lead investigating Fish and Wildlife officer, Bryan Davidson. “In this case, we were able to follow up on a public report of a poached black bear, and we found that Beck and Hutt allegedly unlawfully killed three black bears.”

In addition to the bears, the two men are also charged with poaching two bull elk and three buck blacktail deer. The men are charged in Clallam County with unlawfully hunting the three deer, taking an over limit of deer, and unlawfully using an illegal caliber of weapon to hunt big game. The men were also charged in Jefferson County for poaching two bull elk in the Brinnon area in the summer of 2018.

As a result Hutt was charged in Clallam County with hunting/possessing deer without a license, failing to tag deer, unlawfully carrying a loaded pistol in a vehicle in open view, possessing a loaded shotgun, and a rifle in a motor vehicle, and unlawfully possessing bobcat, river otter, and a harlequin duck. Hutt was also charged for possessing methamphetamine found on his person during his arrest.

“We couldn’t have completed this arrest without the Clallam County Sheriff’s Department and the Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team,” said Davidson. “Cases like these take the whole community, and we’re grateful for those who provided information to help us in this investigation.”

Hutt is due to appear in Clallam County Superior Court Friday, Feb. 21 and in Jefferson County Superior Court in April for his next court hearings.

-WDFW-

=========================================================


Alleged prolific poacher is jailed - Sequim Gazette Wednesday, February 19, 2020 1:30am


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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostWed Feb 26, 2020 5:19 pm 
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Tuesday February 25, 2020 16:38 PST

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW reviews status of 19 wildlife species
Agency seeks data from external researchers, non-profits and naturalists


OLYMPIA - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is seeking the public's help to provide information on 19 wildlife species as part of a periodic review of native wildlife populations.

WDFW's review process includes the following species: Steller Sea Lion, Killer Whale, Lynx, Western Gray Squirrel, Woodland Caribou, Columbian White-tailed Deer, Brown Pelican, White Pelican, Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, Greater Sage-grouse, Sandhill Crane, Snowy Plover, Marbled Murrelet, Northern Spotted Owl, Streaked Horned Lark, Oregon Vesper Sparrow, Western Pond Turtle, and Taylor's Checkerspot butterfly. For a preliminary schedule of presentations to be made to the Fish and Wildlife Commission on these species by year, please visit our WDFW's Species Status Review website.

The species have all been listed, have been recently de-listed, or are being reviewed for listing as endangered, threatened or sensitive by the State of Washington.

"We are interested in obtaining information from the public, including non-governmental organizations, universities, private researchers and naturalists, to supplement current data," said Hannah Anderson, listing and recovery section manager for WDFW's Wildlife Diversity Division.

"We're fortunate to have people in Washington who care deeply and engage on these issues," she added. "Such groups and individuals likely have valuable data, such as annual population counts or privately developed habitat management plans."

WDFW is specifically looking for information on:

Species demographics
Habitat conditions
Threats and trends
Conservation measures that have benefited the species
New data collected since the last status review for the species
Public input is an important part of gathering the best available scientific data for any species, said Anderson. "We greatly value this information and all the people who work with us to conserve and protect species," she added.

Wildlife managers will use the information to help update status reports for each species. More information on the process is available on WDFW's Species Status Review website.

The public may share information by email vial TandEpubliccom@dfw.wa.gov, or by mail to Hannah Anderson, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, P.O. Box 43141, Olympia, WA 98504-3141.

WDFW will seek additional public comments, complete a draft status review and make updated status reports available on the department's website as they are completed. The public will be able to view the most recent species reports and past reports online.

WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and other outdoor recreation opportunities. The agency works to keep common species common and restore species of greatest conservation need.

-WDFW-

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Wednesday February 26, 2020 16:45 PST

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW plans controlled burns on six Eastern Washington wildlife areas


Annual controlled burns on Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) lands in eastern Washington start in March, as conditions allow. Prescribed fire on WDFW wildlife areas reduces the risk of wildfire, reduces risks to community safety and health, and improves habitat for animals such as deer, elk, and bighorn sheep.

WDFW provides active management for more than one million acres of public lands and operates the state's only prescribed fire management teams. The teams include four full-time foresters and 18 burn-team members. Their past work with controlled burns can help prevent larger wildfires later.

"It's not a question of whether we'll have wildfires on these lands, but rather the degree to which we can reduce the damage they do," said WDFW Prescribed Fire Manager Matt Eberlein. "By burning off accumulations of vegetation, we can reduce the risk of high-intensity wildfires that destroy wildlife habitat."

With funding from the state's 2019-2021 Capital Budget and other grant funds, WDFW intends to treat 10,000 acres by 2021.The work will preserve ecosystems, which helps people to enjoy continued access to Fish and Wildlife public lands.

Restoration fires in the following popular areas begin in the coming month, weather permitting:

Sherman Creek Wildlife Area, 524 acres in Ferry County, 10 mile west of Kettle Falls
Rustlers Gulch Wildlife Area, 523 acres in Pend Oreille County, 15 miles southwest of Newport
Methow Wildlife Area, 248 acres in Okanogan County, 10 miles northeast of Winthrop
Colockum Wildlife Area, 500 acres in Chelan County, 10 miles southeast of Wenatchee
Oak Creek Wildlife Area, 120 acres in Yakima County, 15 miles west of Naches
Grouse Flats Wildlife Area, 400 acres in Asotin County, 40 miles southwest of Clarkston
Additional burns on WDFW eastern Washington lands could be announced as conditions allow.

Public safety is a high priority with any prescribed fire. WDFW staff post signs to inform recreationists, but smoke can still cause visibility issues.

"We work to minimize smoke, but smoke from planned fires can reach populated areas. Please slow down if you experience reduced visibility on roadways, particularly at night or in the early morning," Eberlein said. "Given that fire personnel and their equipment may be working in the area, it's just a good idea."

According to Eberlein, the WDFW burn team also protects public safety by monitoring controlled fires continuously until they are out and past any likelihood of unintentional spread. 

By actively managing lands, restoring habitats, and preserving wild places, WDFW serves as steward for Washington's natural places, protecting the state's land and water for its human and wildlife populations.

For more on prescribed fire, as well as other information about how WDFW manages for healthy forests, see the WDFW forest management story map, which outlines the projects conducted throughout the state. (HERE: https://wdfw.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=9b46358c50cb4ac99325991d23c4157f )

The WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting, and other recreation opportunities.

-WDFW-

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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