Forum Index > Trail Talk > Was 2019 the Deadliest year for Washington Hikers?
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
carlb328
Member
Member


Joined: 28 May 2007
Posts: 273 | TRs
Location: Yakima, WA
carlb328
  Top

Member
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 6:44 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
So, this year we had the high profile disappearance of Sam Sayers, plus another mysterious disappearance near Marblemount, and several people dying from falling off cliffs, etc. Here are some samples of the stories. I don't ever remember hearing of so many hikers dying in Washington in one year:

https://www.heraldnet.com/news/a-year-later-no-plans-to-renew-search-for-hiker-sam-sayers/

https://snowbrains.com/hiker-missing-cascades-october-17th/

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/washington/articles/2019-09-03/hiker-dies-during-solo-day-hike-in-cascade-mountains

https://komonews.com/news/local/texas-climber-dies-in-fall-in-washington-state-mountains

https://q13fox.com/2019/08/06/1-hiker-dies-in-fall-3-rescued-in-cascades/
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
neek
Member
Member


Joined: 12 Sep 2011
Posts: 1269 | TRs
Location: Seattle, WA
neek
  Top

Member
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 7:16 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
It's not safe out there. Best to stay home.

Sam was 2018 btw.

You're right though, it would be nice to see some actual numbers. You could just be experiencing availability bias. Also, what counts? Heart attacks? Avalanches? Suicides? And consider the increase in overall outdoor activity. In general the world is getting safer, but sometimes there are isolated regressions, so I dunno. Be prepared for a string of rants from old guys about how people are getting stupider.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 4337 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 10:04 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
ANAM publishes detailed statistics and analysis for climbers.  It would be interesting to see something like that for hiking.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
OldGuyz
Member
Member





OldGuyz
  Top

Member
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 10:39 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
neek wrote:
Be prepared for a string of rants from old guys about how people are getting stupider.

Perhaps it's just the increase in population that accounts for more stupid people. dizzy.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
BigBrunyon
Member
Member


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 848 | TRs
Location: the fitness gyms!!
BigBrunyon
  Top

Member
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 10:47 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I consider myself much smarter than others when I'm on the trail!! That's my go-to mindset

--------------
YOU NEVER KNOW!!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 4337 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 10:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
OldGuyz wrote:
neek wrote:
Be prepared for a string of rants from old guys about how people are getting stupider.

Perhaps it's just the increase in population that accounts for more stupid people. dizzy.gif

Does the increase in population account for the increase in ranting?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Slugman
It’s a Slugfest!



Joined: 27 Mar 2003
Posts: 16369 | TRs

Slugman
  Top

It’s a Slugfest!
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 11:06 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I think the comment “hearing of” in the original post says a lot. Did more things happen, or did we hear about things more? Sam Sayers is a prime example, one person, two years ago, statistically that is nothing.

I wonder if anyone compiles an annual list of hiking or wilderness accidents or deaths. Seems unlikely as so many agencies would be involved, and what would you include or exclude?

--------------
“The jerking motion of a knee does not reflect the operation of a mind”  Slugman, January 24th 2020
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brushwork
Food truck



Joined: 18 Aug 2018
Posts: 508 | TRs
Location: Washington
Brushwork
  Top

Food truck
PostThu Dec 26, 2019 7:15 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Of the accidents that I know about, ie friends or family.... none of them were caused by stupidity.   Sometimes mistakes might of been made, but none were stupid.

--------------
When I grow up I wanna play.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey
Member
Member


Joined: 04 Sep 2003
Posts: 732 | TRs
Location: SW Washington
Mikey
  Top

Member
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 1:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Apparently most of the hikers in these accidents were solo (except for the Iron Cap Mtn hiker fall Aug 2019).  Possibly there are some people unaccustomed to off-trail or steep trail travel.  As a kid, I can recall my city kid friends going hiking or hunting with me in the woods (not on trails) and how they were not used to travel through rough terrain (age12-15). The city kids lived in areas with paved streets and sidewalks whereas my parents' place was located where there were gravel roads, no sidewalks, no baseball fields, no parks, and so kids played in the woods.   The Seattle Mountaineers kept records of basic climbing class students and there were a few students who were "accident prone" at field trips and later accident prone on basic experience climbs. So probably stupidity has little to do with the hiker accidents.  Perhaps lack of steep trail, off trail, and hiking and scrambling in rocky terrain are involved.  Navigation skills also might be involved.  I was impressed at how my Dad seemed to navigate as we hiked (off trail through old-growth forest) to remote lakes for fishing using dead reckoning whereas I was using map, compass, and altimeter.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
snowmonkey
Member
Member


Joined: 23 May 2014
Posts: 28 | TRs

snowmonkey
  Top

Member
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 8:22 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey wrote:
city kids lived in areas with paved streets and sidewalks

Correlation between metropolitan area population increase of elaborately decked out REI millennials on trails and SAR events would be an interesting read. I feel the gear industry is selling snake-oil confidence with many of their items, perhaps contributing to solo hikers finding themselves in unprepared terrain or situations.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MangyMarmot
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Apr 2012
Posts: 337 | TRs

MangyMarmot
  Top

Member
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 9:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Every year a number of people die in the mountains from falls, avalanches, medical issues, etc. The mainstream media doesn't report most of them. This year we've had a few stories that the media has picked up, but I'm not sure that the overall number is higher than normal.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
moonspots
Happy Curmudgeon



Joined: 03 Feb 2007
Posts: 2253 | TRs
Location: North Dakota
moonspots
  Top

Happy Curmudgeon
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 9:49 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mikey wrote:
I was impressed at how my Dad seemed to navigate as we hiked (off trail through old-growth forest) to remote lakes for fishing using dead reckoning whereas I was using map, compass, and altimeter.

Yeah, I also learned "land nav" from dad when we were out deer hunting in Oregon. The first time I actually got "lost" was when I was using a compass to determine my way back to dad when he asked me to retrieve something from the car. I carefully read the compass on the way to the car (as I was "dead reckoning" my way there), then carefully mis-computed the math for the return and ended up maybe 1/4 - 1/2 mile from my start when I got to the edge of the bluff. I was sure where I was as compared to where I was supposed to be, and was correct. I'll have to figure out this compass business later I figured.

I've used this same method for finding my way around ever since, and in big cities with lots of tall buildings or hills this is especially useful. Well, except years ago in west Chicago on an overcast day such that north was indistinguishable from west, etc. I finally had to buy a street map to sort it all out...

--------------
"Out, OUT you demons of Stupidity"! - St Dogbert, patron Saint of Technology
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
BigBrunyon
Member
Member


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 848 | TRs
Location: the fitness gyms!!
BigBrunyon
  Top

Member
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 10:30 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
snowmonkey wrote:
solo hikers finding themselves in unprepared terrain

I've been saying this for years! The terrain needs to prepare for ME not the other way round

--------------
YOU NEVER KNOW!!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Downhill
Member
Member


Joined: 30 Jul 2018
Posts: 207 | TRs
Location: Leavenworth
Downhill
  Top

Member
PostFri Dec 27, 2019 11:59 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm guessing that with social media and internet news reporting, there is probably more wide-spread awareness of incidents.  And as others have said, the increase in popularity and regional population, in general, will result in more incidents.

That said, without any stats to back up my statement, I think the sport is getting safer with better clothing, shelters, route beta, mobile navigation devices, rescue beacons, etc....
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
forest gnome
Forest nut...



Joined: 24 Apr 2003
Posts: 3345 | TRs
Location: north cascades!!
forest gnome
  Top

Forest nut...
PostSat Dec 28, 2019 10:10 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I've wanted to start a similar thread...usuallly the timing is not good after the losses...


there should be some detailed accident report or thread where friends that were there or rescuer's can give the simple basic facts of what happened....

not for pure climbers...mostly for Backpackers, even including injury's and how the party was rescued or self-rescued..

I do remember a super popular pair? of guys from this sight... of climbers who were descending in a storm, very experienced bad vis...there was a whole discussion (from the survivor) about the details of what happend....basically one went behind a boulder to put on a shell jacket, the other gentleman took a wrong turn a short distance and fell through a cornice...tragic loss for all the friends here who climbed with them..will try to look up the story again as we can all learn from these story's.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > Was 2019 the Deadliest year for Washington Hikers?
  Happy Birthday fungal05!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy