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Fishing
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PostSat Jan 18, 2020 9:55 pm 
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So just getting started in backpacking looking for ideas for gear that I will need I already have a bag i need sleeping bag and light weight tent anybody getting rid of stuff let me know or just ideas where to get stuff for a decent price. And ideas on anything else I will need.
Your tips are greatly appreciated.  Just in 2 days I have already learned alot here
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RichP
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PostSat Jan 18, 2020 10:38 pm 
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Just saw this post from Schroder. You might get some good deals here.

http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8031188
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Ski
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PostSat Jan 18, 2020 10:43 pm 
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Check the "Trading Post" forum here for stuff that members are selling or giving away.

I bought a pair of old-school Merrell boots on Craigslist for $15 bucks + $20 shipping.

You can find used gear cheap if you look around. Sometimes free.

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Waterman
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PostSun Jan 19, 2020 10:23 am 
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Check out thrift stores.   You can find used guide books or equipment that is no longer needed.

Get a couple of cashmere sweaters for a base layer. No need for high tech / high price clothing. Keep it simple.  A 10' X 12' tarp from home depot is more than adequate when its not too buggy.

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Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by. And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost
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Fishing
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PostSun Jan 19, 2020 11:11 am 
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Thanks for tips everybody you have all been very helpful
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InFlight
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PostSun Jan 19, 2020 2:16 pm 
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For tents looks at the Tarptent Motrail or Sixmoon Designs Lunar Solo.  Both are solo shelters under two pounds, and under $230.  These are both Silnylon Shelters.  Dyneema shelters are about half the weight at three times the cost.

Sleeping bags have a lot of options.  Synthetic is cheaper than down, but for the same temperature rating will be heavier and more bulky.  Down Bags have fill ratings from 600 to 950.  Higher Fill ratings will be lighter at the same temperature rating, and compress smaller.  Cost goes up significantly with fill rating.  There is also quilt and regular bag options.  Temperature ratings in the 30-50 range are summer only, 20 degrees is the best for three seasons. The affordable bag we recommend for high adventure scouts was the Kelty cosmic down 20; it a 600 fill but under $200.  Feathered Friends (Seattle), Western Mountaineering, and Enlighted Equipment are popular high end bags.

Backpacks in the 48-60 liter range are really ideal. Fit is really critical, so Id suggest going to REI and trying on quite a few with weight add.  Ideally under two pounds, Osprey Exos, Levity, and HMG Southwest are some good options that they carry.

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I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...  ― Henry David Thoreau
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Cyclopath
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PostSun Jan 19, 2020 6:23 pm 
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Waterman wrote:
Check out thrift stores.   You can find used guide books or equipment that is no longer needed.

Get a couple of cashmere sweaters for a base layer. No need for high tech / high price clothing. Keep it simple.  A 10' X 12' tarp from home depot is more than adequate when its not too buggy.

I use thrift store cashmere sweaters for mid layers.  I don't feel guilty abusing them because they were $10.  Very warm, breathes really well, warm when wet, soft like kitten fur ... what's not to love?

I dated a girl who would cut the shoulders off, sew elastic into the wide end, and use them as leg warmers.  She'd make things like hats out of the leftovers.
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dave allyn
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PostSun Jan 19, 2020 7:34 pm 
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Get the book Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills. If you're heading for the mountains this is your bible. Everything you need to know about clothing, tents, safety and everything else.
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Snuffy
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PostTue Jan 21, 2020 7:41 am 
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I have found some good gear on sites like Offer Up and there are used gear Facebook pages, too.


https://www.facebook.com/groups/WashingtonHikersandClimbersGearSwap/

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You don't find yourself standing at the top of a mountain without having started out in the valley.
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WaState
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 12:52 am 
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Most times check the weather forecast and during good weather and 3 season . The info I give is good.

Then you can use a tarp, I use a 10x10 sil nylon foot flat tarp set up with two trekking poles, weight  with lightest  cordage  and 5 ti stakes, it is 1.4 lbs.  For good weather and not too high up.  Can take 30mph wind and rain.  Study all the tarp set ups for square tarp, get a slightly big tarp, the bigger tarp means rain protection.

Get the best down sleeping bag or quilt you can afford,  20 degree F rating to use 3 season.

Get one of the SOL breathable survival bivy snacks, they  work good. Three different types and all are good. Use it while camping with sleeping bag.

A simple closed cell ridge rest works good for a pad. I like the roll up kind. Get the thickest one, I like the 24 inch wide pad cut the length down from  bottom of heals to base of neck for length. Use pack or boot for pillow. Put the pad  straight up and down along the side of pack for carrying. If want more comfort also get a short torso pad to carry with it of some kind. The closed cell pad is like a ground cloth since the tarp has no floor.

A good all around pack size is 50 liters.

Any canister stove works fine, can find cheap ones at fred Myers etc. The cheap ones should work fine. Any kind of small aluminum pot should work fine. Or just take granola and powdered almond milk and forget the cooked meals.

Some guys use no water filtration in the cascades, only get good running water, they claim to never get sick , that is cheap.

Thrift stores are great for clothes.

Get this ,  light nylon wind shirt. A light t shirt, synthetic. Then try out a light fleece and a thin polyester synthetic long sleeve shirt. Look for merino wool sweaters. For all items be care full how you wash and dry. Regular soap ruins technical clothing. Do no dry wool in the dryer.  Pants or shorts look for spandex with nylon.  Rarely need a hardshell,  most times a light poncho works better. Play with these items see what works for you.

Look for a good cheap puffy jacket with a hood, if you keep checking the thrift store eventually will find a good.one. A goose down puffy is only safe if a very good weather forecast.

Jacket
Most times all you need is a wind shirt as the forecast is good , can back that up with a light cheap poncho. Most often a hard shell is not needed. Ie good weather forecast.  Make sure windshirt is breathable.  Put mouth to fabric , seal lips,  breathe in and out to check.

Legs, get nylon spandex pants , chinos etc, Union Bay sells these cheap, best hiking pants ever. I use hiking shorts as well, or otherwise zip offs pants will save weight.

For bugs, most times all you need is a head net, and clothes.

Buy the best foot ware you can afford.  Not a good place to save money.
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Fishing
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 7:22 am 
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https://www.bosonshop.com/products/bosonshop-outdoor-lightweight-portable-single-person-easy-setup-tent-with-carry-bag-1?variant=20520494825534¤cy=USD&utm_campaign=gs-2019-12-02&utm_source=google&utm_medium=smart_campaign&gclid=Cj0KCQiAyKrxBRDHARIsAKCzn8zBXxT-n-l_h-BKjZNseHpppY2hUT6_KHx_op_zAZFqJyPFj71_7AQaAt77EALw_wcB



https://www.mountainwarehouse.com/us/summit-250-sleeping-bag-p13091.aspx/Orange/?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=SMART+SHOPPING+-+SHOPPING+US&utm_term=&utm_content=|pcrid|390932670121|pkw||pmt||pdv|m|slid||product|023158036006|&gclid=Cj0KCQiAyKrxBRDHARIsAKCzn8yL7MsMAr7qj8PH9uh6llBEEOLbpPhpx-k0nAjehKRdX27NPWPcvcMaAqaLEALw_wcB 

just what I have been looking at so far
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Fishing
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 7:27 am 
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https://www.walmart.com/ip/Waterproof-2-3-Person-Camping-Tent-Automatic-Pop-Up-Quick-Shelter-Outdoor-Hiking/665348761?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=1848&adid=22222222228079965182&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=192814890388&wl4=aud-430887228898:pla-305322163105&wl5=9033656&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=113146030&wl11=online&wl12=665348761&veh=sem&gclid=Cj0KCQiAyKrxBRDHARIsAKCzn8ztG5s3PtoiMQAzYACCBXPEtiwUm7QjrobG9c3yt9MxSCfSLy1te6QaAvBPEALw_wcB
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Fishing
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 7:30 am 
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https://www.stealthangelsurvival.com/products/ultralight-portable-outdoor-pot-pan-stove-set-with-piezo-ignition?variant=37226664841¤cy=USD&gclid=Cj0KCQiAyKrxBRDHARIsAKCzn8y4taxjIj0pHpFZzfAU2WAw6Wufja3Fg6reaw40sOd8CyJTkQXYgkUaArBJEALw_wcB
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WaState
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 11:58 am 
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Stove set probably pretty good.  For  tent, for summer  use i would prefer a sil nylon flat tarp.  For one person a 6 by 9 foot for two person 10 by 10 foot, or something close to those sizes. Study intensely the set up options on the internet. Head net for bugs. For low weight and expense a flat tarp  (sil nylon) is hard to beat.

It is best to buy the best goose down sleeping bag or quilt you can afford, 20 degree is best for all around usage. Look for used gear on Ebay.  I have a 15 dollar goose down bag from a thrift store, I washed it with the right kind of soap and it loft up almost like new. Do not wash tech gear in regular soap. Most tech gear in thrift stores are ruined by washing in regular soap.

If want a cheaper tent or sleeping bag look on Ebay.  Sometimes China direct is very good. Good deals on offer up.

The SOL 5.5 oz breathable bivy sack is a good bivy cover for a sleeping bag, it is about 30$.  Fine for normal sized person with 3 season wieght sleeping bag.

I suspect you would be more dry with a well set up tarp rather than a cheaper tent in a rain storm.

Bear paw tarp on Ebay is great. I have one of these with custom center tie. I make a semi A frame tent like structure with two treaking poles. Went through many mild rain events or slight blows in the mountains with a 10 by 10 tarp, stayed totally dry with two people. Extra carry weight since I already use two trekking poles is only 1.4 lbs with ultra light guy lines pre tied  and with 5 titanium stakes.
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Grannyhiker
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PostFri Jan 24, 2020 12:10 pm 
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Lotsa good advice on Paul Magnati's blog--here are some articles to start with:

How to start backpacking

Gear lists:
The most frugal
Budget list--next step up
"Jack of all Trades Gear"  Gear that can also be used for other purposes, like car camping.

If you have some gear for car camping, you probably can use it unless it's really bulky and heavy.  Don't spend the $$$ on two sets of gear if you can avoid it!

"PMags"  advice is for the Colorado Rockies 3-season, which is pretty similar to the high Cascades.  The Colorado Rockies have more violent weather (afternoon thunderstorms) in summer, less chance of multi-day rains and generally slightly colder nights.  However, last time I was there, they were having a multi-day storm, light rain most of the day with drenching thunderstorms late afternoon and early evening, plus frost at night when it cleared.  I always used the same gear for both regions.

The above lists do not include one-time bargains like sales, thrift store finds, good used gear.  You've been given lots of good ideas on those.  Be careful of cheaply made stuff like pop-up tents which generally don't hold up under mountain weather conditions.

Another good source is SectionHiker.com The author mostly backpacks in New Hampshire's White Mountains, where the weather can be the most severe in the US.  He has lots of "Ten Best ..." lists which I'm not too fond of, but will give you some ideas.  He also explains sleeping bag temp ratings, goose down fill power ratings, and, most recently, the new sleeping pad "R" ratings.

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May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
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