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pula58
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PostThu Mar 25, 2021 10:16 am 
gb wrote:
The 12-45 is supposed to be a very nice lens (sharp, great colors, contrast.

Yes, that lens is very sharp, and small, and doesn't weigh much. A great backpacking lens!

I may possibly get a used Panasonic/Leica 12mm-60mm lens at some point to get a little more reach and a bit wider max aperture.

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jstluise
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PostMon Aug 02, 2021 4:45 pm 
I'm glad I ran across this thread. @pula58, How are you liking the EM5.3?

I've been researching cameras the last couple weeks and this one with the Pro 12-45 is at the top of my list. My first serious camera (that I still have) was the Nikon D90 which I had a lot of fun with. But eventually as the rest of my gear got lighter, I started leaving it at home more and more due to its size/weight.

I'd like to get a setup that I won't mind bringing along on trips and the EM5.3 seems to fit the bill quite well. At first I was looking at the EM1.3 for the ergonomics (larger grip) and extra functionality, but I think the EM5.3 is a good compromise for the cost and weight savings. I did read about concerns over the EM5.3 tripod mount strength due to the plastic body, and even accounts of failure using certain backpack mounting systems (e.g. PD Capture). However, I have seen and would likely get an add-on grip that increases grip size and provides a more robust tripod mount for only 2-3 extra ounces.

Also on my list is the APS-C Sony A6600 that I played with a bit at a store. Ergonomics were nice with the larger grip. And the larger sensor is tempting. But again, the EM5.3 looks like a good compromise especially with size/weight being one of the main factors for me. Compared to the A6600, I do like you can articulate and hide the screen on the EM5.3 for added protection.

One thing I'm not sure about on the EM5.3 until I start using it is the power switch on the left side. I'm just used to only needing one hand to turn the camera on. Even with the D90 I recall pulling it out and grabbing a quick shot one handed while my other hand was busy with a pole, axe, or rock. I suppose if the carrying system allows for it you could switch the camera on before picking it up one-handed.

Any other thoughts would be appreciated!

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mike
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PostMon Aug 02, 2021 9:06 pm 
I gotta say that the 12-100/4 Pro has been pretty much glued to the camera since I got it last winter. Fabulous lens.

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pula58
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PostThu Aug 12, 2021 9:07 am 
jstluise wrote:
I'm glad I ran across this thread. @pula58, How are you liking the EM5.3?

I've been researching cameras the last couple weeks and this one with the Pro 12-45 is at the top of my list. My first serious camera (that I still have) was the Nikon D90 which I had a lot of fun with. But eventually as the rest of my gear got lighter, I started leaving it at home more and more due to its size/weight.

I'd like to get a setup that I won't mind bringing along on trips and the EM5.3 seems to fit the bill quite well. At first I was looking at the EM1.3 for the ergonomics (larger grip) and extra functionality, but I think the EM5.3 is a good compromise for the cost and weight savings. I did read about concerns over the EM5.3 tripod mount strength due to the plastic body, and even accounts of failure using certain backpack mounting systems (e.g. PD Capture). However, I have seen and would likely get an add-on grip that increases grip size and provides a more robust tripod mount for only 2-3 extra ounces.

Also on my list is the APS-C Sony A6600 that I played with a bit at a store. Ergonomics were nice with the larger grip. And the larger sensor is tempting. But again, the EM5.3 looks like a good compromise especially with size/weight being one of the main factors for me. Compared to the A6600, I do like you can articulate and hide the screen on the EM5.3 for added protection.

One thing I'm not sure about on the EM5.3 until I start using it is the power switch on the left side. I'm just used to only needing one hand to turn the camera on. Even with the D90 I recall pulling it out and grabbing a quick shot one handed while my other hand was busy with a pole, axe, or rock. I suppose if the carrying system allows for it you could switch the camera on before picking it up one-handed.

Any other thoughts would be appreciated!

I like my Em5.3 with 12-45 Oly pro F/4 lens!
Especially once I got into editing raw files. That really brings photos to life. Out of camera JPG's were generally good, but for some photos I needed to edit the raws to get them to look how the scenes looked in reality. Things like bringing up shadows, and toning down highlights.
The camera is fairly small and light weight, I don't find the power switch to be a hassle.
The menus are not great, but useable. I took me a while to find my way around them. the Forums on DPReview helped.
The IBIS is amazing...I had no idea what a difference this could make until I had the Olympus!
At times I feel limited by the F/4 max aperture of the Oly 12-45 pro lens, and have contemplated getting a Panasonic/Leica 12mm-60mm lens...but the Oly 12-45 F/4 Pro lens images are very sharp, and the lens is so small and light weight!

I don't have a tripod....we're trying to keep our backpacking stuff as light as possible. So, I have no experience with the tripod mount failures that some people have reported. I carry the camera in a holster style bag made by "Ape Case." I can access the camera quickly, and get it put away quickly. So, I don't use the shoulder strap camera mount method (like "Peak Design" for example) that many people use (tripod mount problems are mostly associated with this carrying method I think). I like a camera to be protected when it is not in use.

Good luck!

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jstluise
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PostThu Aug 12, 2021 10:14 am 
pula58 wrote:
I like my Em5.3 with 12-45 Oly pro F/4 lens!
Especially once I got into editing raw files. That really brings photos to life. Out of camera JPG's were generally good, but for some photos I needed to edit the raws to get them to look how the scenes looked in reality. Things like bringing up shadows, and toning down highlights.
The camera is fairly small and light weight, I don't find the power switch to be a hassle.
The menus are not great, but useable. I took me a while to find my way around them. the Forums on DPReview helped.
The IBIS is amazing...I had no idea what a difference this could make until I had the Olympus!
At times I feel limited by the F/4 max aperture of the Oly 12-45 pro lens, and have contemplated getting a Panasonic/Leica 12mm-60mm lens...but the Oly 12-45 F/4 Pro lens images are very sharp, and the lens is so small and light weight!

I don't have a tripod....we're trying to keep our backpacking stuff as light as possible. So, I have no experience with the tripod mount failures that some people have reported. I carry the camera in a holster style bag made by "Ape Case." I can access the camera quickly, and get it put away quickly. So, I don't use the shoulder strap camera mount method (like "Peak Design" for example) that many people use (tripod mount problems are mostly associated with this carrying method I think). I like a camera to be protected when it is not in use.

Good luck!

Great! Thanks for the feedback! I did end up pulling the trigger on the EM5.3 and 12-45 f/4 lens earlier this week, so I'm looking forward to it arriving. I also ordered a cheap add-on grip from eBay, so we'll see what that looks like and if I'll end up using it.

What Ape Case holster did you find to fit the EM5.3 + 12-45? I'll have to check them out. I ordered a couple Think Tank bags/holsters to try as well. I used a holster bag with my old setup and it worked great, so I may go that route again.

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pula58
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PostThu Aug 12, 2021 1:29 pm 
jstluise wrote:
What Ape Case holster did you find to fit the EM5.3 + 12-45?

Ape Case ACPRO600 Compact DSLR Holster

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mike
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PostThu Aug 12, 2021 3:04 pm 
Anyone interested in an Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-200mm f/3.5-6.3 Lens?

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PostFri Aug 13, 2021 8:21 am 
I have three Olympus bodies - the EM-1 I, the EM-1 II, and last winter the EM-1X. The old and small EM-1 I is still a good hiking body, not much different in size than the EM-5 III. So, I carry that as a basic hiking camera. But for backpacks with scenic camps and high scenery hikes with good atmospheric optics the EM-1 II with the newer 20MP sensor is better especially with regard to highlight control. I don't feel limited by the Em-1 II in that regard. Although the EM-1 II is good for birding, the EM-1X is quite a bit better. The stabilization is really terrific. Two days ago I shot some images of mosses in the alpine by handholding the camera's Focus Stacking function (15 shots camera controlled). I was amazed, it worked very well. I wouldn't normally carry the EM-1X hiking, but I went with the hope to shoot Bumblebees and the hike was not that long - 2 hours up.

But to Pula's point, I really don't carry a tripod nowadays when in the mountains. There is no need at all with great IBIS. I would still need a tripod to shoot astro/landscape, but that is a pretty specialized situation that I am willing to sacrifice to cut two pounds of weight. I still use a tripod when I Focus Stack images of mosses in low light forests in winter. Otherwise, a tripod for me is a thing of the past.

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PostFri Aug 13, 2021 9:59 am 
gb wrote:
ut to Pula's point, I really don't carry a tripod nowadays when in the mountains. There is no need at all with great IBIS. I would still need a tripod to shoot astro/landscape, but that is a pretty specialized situation that I am willing to sacrifice to cut two pounds of weight. I still use a tripod when I Focus Stack images of mosses in low light forests in winter. Otherwise, a tripod for me is a thing of the past.

Checkout the Pedco Ultrapod, it supper easy to strap to a tree branch or a trekking pole.   I have an mini-arca swiss mount on mine, with a combined weight of 5.6 ounces.

I often use slower shutter speeds shooting some water landscapes as well.

--------------
I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...  ― Henry David Thoreau
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PostThu Aug 26, 2021 11:31 pm 
Long post ahead, feel free to pass on by if you don't care to nerd out about the E-M5.3 and it's tripod mount issue...

I've had the E-M5.3 for a little while now...still lots to play with and figure out but I'm really digging it so far. The form factor is great compared to my old setup and it will be awesome out in the field. For now I have the Think Tank Digital Holster 5 case which holds the body + 12-45 nicely even with the hood on. I tried out the Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 10 as well; it was nice but quite big enough to leave the hood on and I tend to like the holster configuration better.

I'm still unsure how I'll carry it in the field. Rigging up the holster on the hip belt or between the straps on the chest are both options I was thinking of. I used the chest harness/holster before with my DSLR and it worked great, so this smaller setup would be even better.

I would really like to use the Capture Clip for some outings, but I won't do that without an add-on plate due to the issues with the tripod mount. Right now I have a add-on plate/grip from Haoge that I'm still deciding on. I really like it for the larger grip, but I will need to do some modifying before I'm comfortable really putting it to use, especially with the Capture Clip.

I'm not sure what the other OM-D cameras look like (maybe the same, but they're metal so it hasn't been an issue), but one problem I see with the E-M5.3 is the area around the tripod mount sits proud of the base (by about 0.015"). This means whatever you have installed using the tripod mount, only makes contact with this small area. This, combined with the forward mount location, is a recipe for trouble as we've seen. Any torque on the mount is only transferred through this small raised area and cannot be distributed to the rest of the camera base plate. So you get flexing, fatigue, and eventually failure. I think the forward mount location and plastic material plays a bigger role in the failures but the raised area doesn't help compared to if it was flush.

The 1st image below shows the Haoge add-on plate installed and the air gap between it due to the raised tripod mount area. Contact is only being made between the two red arrows which is not good. The raised tripod mount area is highlighted in the lower portion of the 1st photo. Also, the Haoge plate has a stiff rubber pad at the mount location (see 2nd photo) which itself is slightly raised, so the gap between the plate and camera is even greater (~0.030"). I'll likely keep this add-on grip, but will remove the rubber pad and use aluminum shim tape in the right places to get contact between the mount and body that I'm happy with. I was also thinking about thin double sided tape between the plate and body for extra rigidity since I don't see needing to remove the plate often, but this is probably not necessary if I get the gaps right.

Should I have just bought the E-M1.3 that already has a good tripod mount and bigger grip? Maybe. The Haoge add-on grip adds 3.5oz which isn't great, but the combo still ends up being 2.2oz lighter than the E-M1.3. Unfortunately there aren't many options out there for add-on grips for the E-M5.3. The Haoge is well made and not terribly expensive, but has the ARCA rails I don't need (the capture clip mount has ARCA rails). Without the ARCA rails the plate could be slimmed down some. Oh, and then there's the ~$550 price difference between the E-M5.3+Grip and the E-M1.3 to consider...



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PostFri Aug 27, 2021 5:54 am 
jstluise wrote:
Long post ahead, feel free to pass on by if you don't care to nerd out about the E-M5.3 and it's tripod mount issue...

I've had the E-M5.3 for a little while now...still lots to play with and figure out but I'm really digging it so far. The form factor is great compared to my old setup and it will be awesome out in the field. For now I have the Think Tank Digital Holster 5 case which holds the body + 12-45 nicely even with the hood on. I tried out the Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 10 as well; it was nice but quite big enough to leave the hood on and I tend to like the holster configuration better.

I'm still unsure how I'll carry it in the field. Rigging up the holster on the hip belt or between the straps on the chest are both options I was thinking of. I used the chest harness/holster before with my DSLR and it worked great, so this smaller setup would be even better.

I would really like to use the Capture Clip for some outings, but I won't do that without an add-on plate due to the issues with the tripod mount. Right now I have a add-on plate/grip from Haoge that I'm still deciding on. I really like it for the larger grip, but I will need to do some modifying before I'm comfortable really putting it to use, especially with the Capture Clip.

I'm not sure what the other OM-D cameras look like (maybe the same, but they're metal so it hasn't been an issue), but one problem I see with the E-M5.3 is the area around the tripod mount sits proud of the base (by about 0.015"). This means whatever you have installed using the tripod mount, only makes contact with this small area. This, combined with the forward mount location, is a recipe for trouble as we've seen. Any torque on the mount is only transferred through this small raised area and cannot be distributed to the rest of the camera base plate. So you get flexing, fatigue, and eventually failure. I think the forward mount location and plastic material plays a bigger role in the failures but the raised area doesn't help compared to if it was flush.

The 1st image below shows the Haoge add-on plate installed and the air gap between it due to the raised tripod mount area. Contact is only being made between the two red arrows which is not good. The raised tripod mount area is highlighted in the lower portion of the 1st photo. Also, the Haoge plate has a stiff rubber pad at the mount location (see 2nd photo) which itself is slightly raised, so the gap between the plate and camera is even greater (~0.030"). I'll likely keep this add-on grip, but will remove the rubber pad and use aluminum shim tape in the right places to get contact between the mount and body that I'm happy with. I was also thinking about thin double sided tape between the plate and body for extra rigidity since I don't see needing to remove the plate often, but this is probably not necessary if I get the gaps right.

Should I have just bought the E-M1.3 that already has a good tripod mount and bigger grip? Maybe. The Haoge add-on grip adds 3.5oz which isn't great, but the combo still ends up being 2.2oz lighter than the E-M1.3. Unfortunately there aren't many options out there for add-on grips for the E-M5.3. The Haoge is well made and not terribly expensive, but has the ARCA rails I don't need (the capture clip mount has ARCA rails). Without the ARCA rails the plate could be slimmed down some. Oh, and then there's the ~$550 price difference between the E-M5.3+Grip and the E-M1.3 to consider...



I would use either a Think Tank, or what I use, a Lowepro 50 AW II to carry my EM-1 I or II with any lens up to the size of the 75-300. With a lens as small as the 12-40 or 12-45 only, there is also a bit smaller Lowe case. But the 50 AW II not only has a neck strap, but 4 attachment points. I have an old harness that fits these attachments, which makes the camera very secure while hiking. However, when chest carrying, the camera would get in the way in scrambling, in brush, etc. It is also more comfortable not to hike with a camera on your chest. So, when hiking and not anticipating shooting I put the whole thing in my pack. I also carry extra lenses in the pack in soft cases. What I give up here is the ability to shoot wildlife quickly. But if I was hiking in the Canadian Rockies or Yellowstone or something, I would either carry the camera in hand with a longer telephoto, or I can use a much larger Lowepro 75 AW II (not as comfortable). This is for the EM-1X or EM-1 II with the 300 F4. When birding at say Union Bay, though, I can carry either of these set-ups simply in hand for 2-3 hours, occasionally putting the rig in a partially zipped case.

If you use a chest-mounted case, be sure to rig up or purchase a harness with four points of attachment. Personally, I would not carry any camera exposed on a chest clip when hiking in the mountains.

As to the known design flaw of the new EM-5 III tripod mount fault, I would not carry the camera slung over my shoulder with that weakness. But, I would not worry about using a tripod when set up for shooting. In that situation, the tripod is highly unlikely to cause problems. Besides, you only need a tripod for night shooting (because of great stabilization) or with low light macro shooting because of the issues one has with body motion affecting the actual focus point of the image. In good light I just shoot several images when shooting macro to compensate for body motion.

You can read more about the EM-5 III tripod mount weakness and what people do about it in the DPR micro four thirds forum, or start your own thread. https://www.dpreview.com/forums/1041

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PostFri Aug 27, 2021 9:39 am 
gb wrote:
I would use either a Think Tank, or what I use, a Lowepro 50 AW II to carry my EM-1 I or II with any lens up to the size of the 75-300. With a lens as small as the 12-40 or 12-45 only, there is also a bit smaller Lowe case. But the 50 AW II not only has a neck strap, but 4 attachment points. I have an old harness that fits these attachments, which makes the camera very secure while hiking. However, when chest carrying, the camera would get in the way in scrambling, in brush, etc. It is also more comfortable not to hike with a camera on your chest. So, when hiking and not anticipating shooting I put the whole thing in my pack. I also carry extra lenses in the pack in soft cases. What I give up here is the ability to shoot wildlife quickly. But if I was hiking in the Canadian Rockies or Yellowstone or something, I would either carry the camera in hand with a longer telephoto, or I can use a much larger Lowepro 75 AW II (not as comfortable). This is for the EM-1X or EM-1 II with the 300 F4. When birding at say Union Bay, though, I can carry either of these set-ups simply in hand for 2-3 hours, occasionally putting the rig in a partially zipped case.

If you use a chest-mounted case, be sure to rig up or purchase a harness with four points of attachment. Personally, I would not carry any camera exposed on a chest clip when hiking in the mountains.

As to the known design flaw of the new EM-5 III tripod mount fault, I would not carry the camera slung over my shoulder with that weakness. But, I would not worry about using a tripod when set up for shooting. In that situation, the tripod is highly unlikely to cause problems. Besides, you only need a tripod for night shooting (because of great stabilization) or with low light macro shooting because of the issues one has with body motion affecting the actual focus point of the image. In good light I just shoot several images when shooting macro to compensate for body motion.

You can read more about the EM-5 III tripod mount weakness and what people do about it in the DPR micro four thirds forum, or start your own thread. https://www.dpreview.com/forums/1041

I also have the 50 AW (version 1) and the 4-point chest harness that I got to use with my D90. I found it worked very well for the bigger camera and didn't find it too intrusive in terms of seeing my feet and scrambling. It does get it in the way when doing anything involving ropes and harnesses, so for anything real technical it went in the pack. Though I did wear it up Rainier a couple times on the less technical routes. And of course using the 4-point harness does make layer changes less quick.

The 50 AW is roomier than I'd like for this setup and I'm having a hard time finding the smaller Lowepro toploaders in stock anywhere. I'll have to keep an eye out for those and other options. But the Think Tank I have is nice for now, I just need to experiment.

I share your concern with having the camera exposed on a shoulder strap with the CC. It is tempting though with this lighter weight setup. An integrated cover with the CC would be nice, like one of the neoprene cases...so the camera still is attached to the strap with the CC, but essentially sits inside a protective cover that adds a little protection.

Thanks for the info!

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PostFri Aug 27, 2021 11:13 am 
I carry my EM5 on a my shoulder straps using the Optec reporter straps. Always handy and never had a problem. Use a neoprene case for brush if necessary and the optec stabilizer strap to keep from bouncing around.

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PostFri Aug 27, 2021 11:27 am 
mike wrote:
I carry my EM5 on a my shoulder straps using the Optec reporter straps. Always handy and never had a problem. Use a neoprene case for brush if necessary and the optec stabilizer strap to keep from bouncing around.

Thanks, that and other Optech options are good to know about. I assume you are using the Reporter/Backpack Connectors like this?


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PostFri Aug 27, 2021 11:45 am 
Yes, those are the ones. I have modified that a bit. I added the mini clip adapters which gives a bit more length to easily get the camera to my eye without unclipping. Use the same mini clips to attach the neck strap. Also add the stabilizer-strap

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