Forum Index > Pacific NW History > The Battle over Miners Ridge
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5765 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostSun Apr 26, 2020 2:01 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
It's featured in a Herald article and a new book that's just come out.


available at Amazon
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
RichP
here and there



Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 4968 | TRs

RichP
  Top

here and there
PostSun Apr 26, 2020 3:37 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I was planning to go to the book launch on April 22 in Moscow where Sowards is a history professor at The U of I but it was postponed due to covid-19. Looks like a fascinating book.

https://www.bookpeopleofmoscow.com/event/postponed-book-launch-w-adam-sowardsan-open-pit-visible-moon
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5446 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostMon Apr 27, 2020 6:26 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
An even riskier and more damaging proposal is the Pebble Mine at the head of the Copper River. The Copper flows into Bristol Bay which has likely the largest sustainable salmon fishery in Alaska, and perhaps the world. The value of the salmon over time would dwarf private company riches from mining. The risk, of course, is the spill of mining waste and leachates into the river.

The riskiest mining proposal in North America

There are any number of articles on this risk from a variety of sources.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5927 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostMon Apr 27, 2020 9:28 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Now I'm worried that Miner's Ridge will be overrun with backpackers this summer....

But yeah, can't get it from the library yet; Sowards has another book about the environmental history of the West Coast, but.....can't put it on hold.

Let us know what you think, Randy. I know a couple of lucky souls who have the book.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  oldgranola, NWHs outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Dick B
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 131 | TRs
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
  Top

Member
PostMon Apr 27, 2020 10:15 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
My Dad, brother and I passed the mining encampment when we hiked out of Lyman to Trinity back in the mid 60's. All I remember were some wall tents, and a hand painted sign that said something like "Ridgefield Pop.45". Had a picture somewhere. I can remember a lot of helicopter traffic going somewhere. We had a similar situation down here on the 3 Sisters Wilderness in the 70s I believe. A mining company had a claim on a pumice deposit on Rock Mesa near the PCT and southwest of the South Sister. Big fight as to whether they could actually commence the operation. I think the Forest Service struck a deal with them and bought out the claim. Don't have many details. Maybe all they wanted was some cash out of the deal.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Anne Elk
BrontosaurusTheorist



Joined: 07 Sep 2018
Posts: 1196 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Anne Elk
  Top

BrontosaurusTheorist
PostMon Apr 27, 2020 6:57 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks for posting this.  I don't read the Herald so would otherwise not have heard of it.  You always put up such interesting stuff in this section.  up.gif

--------------
"There are yahoos out there.  Its why we cant have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sculpin
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Apr 2015
Posts: 721 | TRs

Sculpin
  Top

Member
PostTue Apr 28, 2020 8:22 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I am old enough to remember this.

There is a massive structure up there, down below the trail, but I have never been to it.  You can only see it from across the valley, never from the trail up the Suiattle.

Anyone been down there to take images?  I have walked through the old camps and found bright blue chunks of ore but that is about it.

--------------
Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Malachai Constant
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jan 2002
Posts: 14810 | TRs
Location: Back Again Like A Bad Penny
Malachai Constant
  Top

Member
PostTue Apr 28, 2020 4:22 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
A couple weeks ago we were in eastern Arizona heading home. We drove on highway 191 one of the crookedest highways in the US peaking out over 9000. A portion of the highway goes through Safford Arizona the location of a huge open pit copper mine. The scene is unworldly resembling Mordor on a bad day. There was a mountain ridge here at one time now it is dusty rotten rock where they run ponds and creeks of sulphuric acid to dissolve  out the copper. The air is filled with a toxic haze and no plants grow. It is hard and frightening to think of beautiful Miners Ridge converted into a landscape like that. We should thank the environmental movement for preventing that nightmare.

--------------
"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5927 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostTue Apr 28, 2020 4:45 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
North Cascades Conservation Council among them; we love to harsh on these sometimes-zealots; but back in the day, they really did some good work.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  oldgranola, NWHs outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5765 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostTue Apr 28, 2020 4:50 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
You can also get a good impression what it would have been like along Highway 3 in B.C. near Princeton, between Hope and Penticton. The Copper Mountain mine.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5446 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostWed Apr 29, 2020 7:20 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
North Cascades Conservation Council among them; we love to harsh on these sometimes-zealots; but back in the day, they really did some good work.

They still do. Reactionary responses begin as political movements looking for something to attack.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5927 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostWed Apr 29, 2020 10:25 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
With some exceptions, I don't respect the current NC3 much. I won't go into details here, but yes, they have done good work - not sure about currently, but we certainly enjoy benefits of what was done in the past.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  oldgranola, NWHs outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 12000 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
  Top

Member
PostWed Apr 29, 2020 11:36 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Malachai Constant wrote:
A couple weeks ago we were in eastern Arizona heading home. We drove on highway 191 one of the crookedest highways in the US peaking out over 9000. A portion of the highway goes through Safford Arizona the location of a huge open pit copper mine. The scene is unworldly resembling Mordor on a bad day. There was a mountain ridge here at one time now it is dusty rotten rock where they run ponds and creeks of sulphuric acid to dissolve  out the copper. The air is filled with a toxic haze and no plants grow. It is hard and frightening to think of beautiful Miners Ridge converted into a landscape like that. We should thank the environmental movement for preventing that nightmare.

Imagine where all the copper for the Green Dream must come from.

At some point people need to come to grips with the reality of where what they want actually comes from.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 12000 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
  Top

Member
PostWed Apr 29, 2020 11:40 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb wrote:
An even riskier and more damaging proposal is the Pebble Mine at the head of the Copper River. The Copper flows into Bristol Bay which has likely the largest sustainable salmon fishery in Alaska, and perhaps the world. The value of the salmon over time would dwarf private company riches from mining. The risk, of course, is the spill of mining waste and leachates into the river.

The riskiest mining proposal in North America

There are any number of articles on this risk from a variety of sources.

So the value of the private salmon mining is asserted to be higher than the value of the private gold mining. An interesting assertion, given that private was left out of one description but not the other.

The EPA attempted to stop the mine before they even got a proposal, a clear indication of bias unsupported by consideration of the proposal.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 5765 | TRs
Location: on the beach
Schroder
  Top

Member
PostWed Apr 29, 2020 1:14 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat wrote:
value of the private salmon mining is asserted to be higher than the value of the private gold mining

You've got to be kidding  huh.gif

If you want to discuss the politics of Pebble Mine, take it over here. This thread is about the history of Miners Ridge and a new book coming out.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Pacific NW History > The Battle over Miners Ridge
  Happy Birthday uproar!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy