Forum Index > Trail Talk > questions about fishing Olympic National Park/Forest
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
80skeys
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Jul 2019
Posts: 116 | TRs

80skeys
  Top

Member
PostMon Jul 27, 2020 2:14 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Wondering what the fishing is like in and around the 7 Lakes Basin area? I'm thinking it's probably all trout, smaller streams and alpine lakes? Are the streams too small up in that area?

What about farther downstream on the Hoh and Sol Duc rivers towards the west? Larger rivers at that point? Steelhead?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 11141 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
  Top

><((((°>
PostMon Jul 27, 2020 9:13 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
ONP streams and rivers:

All waters in Olympic National PARK which are OPEN* for angling are:
catch and release ONLY
lures and flies ONLY
single barbless hooks ONLY

Check current regulations at the Park's website.

(* some rivers have been closed during the last few seasons to ALL sportfishing due to low return numbers of anadromous salmonids. *)

(* edited 07/28/20 @ 12:23 PDT *)

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 7380 | TRs
Location: The Hermitage
Bedivere
  Top

Why Do Witches Burn?
PostMon Jul 27, 2020 11:16 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski wrote:
All waters in Olympic National PARK which are OPEN* for angling are:
catch and release ONLY
lures and flies ONLY
single barbless hooks ONLY

Check current regulations at the Park's website.

(* some rivers have been closed during the last few seasons to ALL sportfishing due to low return numbers of anadromous salmonids. *)

A couple points of clarification -

Lakes are different than rivers.  Alpine lakes are pretty unrestricted compared to rivers (barbed hooks, bait allowed, combined daily limit of 5 rainbow and/or cutthroat trout, no limit on brook trout, no minimum size limits).

Link to regs:

https://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/fishing.htm

--------------
Photo Portfolio
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
80skeys
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Jul 2019
Posts: 116 | TRs

80skeys
  Top

Member
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 8:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks for the links. Will likely be mostly be lake fishing due to that's where we'll be camping out most nights.

Question for people familiar with the area: are those lakes stocked, or is it native fish? Besides Hoh and Deer Lakes, any others contain fish?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sculpin
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Apr 2015
Posts: 681 | TRs

Sculpin
  Top

Member
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 10:33 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Everything you need to know about Olympic High Lakes fisheries:

https://wdfw.wa.gov/sites/default/files/publications/00939/wdfw00939.pdf

...which contains the following nugget:

Strictly speaking, virtually all fish stocked into Washington’s high lakes are
exotic to the lakes themselves since the vast majority of the lakes were fishless
since the last glaciation.


--------------
Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis
Trail Blazer/HiLaker



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 1570 | TRs
Location: Silverdale, WA
Brian Curtis
  Top

Trail Blazer/HiLaker
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 10:52 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
To be sure we are all on the same page, there are basically three terms that can apply to fish in high lakes:

Stocked: As the term implies, these are fish that were stocked in a lake.

Wild: These are fish that naturally reproduce in a lake, but derived from fish that were stocked.

Native: These are fish that naturally reproduce in a lake that got there naturally. As mentioned in Sculpin's quote above, there are only a handful of high lakes in the state with native fish.

There are no native fish in ONP high lakes. There are no stocked fish in ONP high lakes (fish can no longer be stocked in ONP). Many high lakes on ONP have wild fish.

--------------
that elitist from silverdale wanted to tell me that all carnes are bad--Studebaker Hoch
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 7380 | TRs
Location: The Hermitage
Bedivere
  Top

Why Do Witches Burn?
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 11:20 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis wrote:
There are no native fish in ONP high lakes. There are no stocked fish in ONP high lakes (fish can no longer be stocked in ONP). Many high lakes on ONP have wild fish.

Something I forgot to mention in my previous post - hasn't the park service been working on eliminating fish in many lakes? If so, doesn't bode well for fishing opportunities there.

--------------
Photo Portfolio
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 11141 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
  Top

><((((°>
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 12:15 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thank you for weighing in on this, Mr. Curtis. Hopefully your comments will eliminate any confusion.

I've gotten different comments and reports over the years from different ONP staffers (both fisheries biologists and law enforcement officers) which would not be appropriate to post here on a public forum, hence my very broad-based response above (which applies primarily to streams - I'm not a lake fisherman.)

In response to Sir Bedivere's question above, it's probably best if I send it via P/M.

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis
Trail Blazer/HiLaker



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 1570 | TRs
Location: Silverdale, WA
Brian Curtis
  Top

Trail Blazer/HiLaker
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 1:45 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Bedivere wrote:
Something I forgot to mention in my previous post - hasn't the park service been working on eliminating fish in many lakes?

Indeed they are. I am not sure if ONP has eliminated reproducing fish from any lakes, yet. They have in MRNP and NCNP.

--------------
that elitist from silverdale wanted to tell me that all carnes are bad--Studebaker Hoch
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
80skeys
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Jul 2019
Posts: 116 | TRs

80skeys
  Top

Member
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 6:59 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
That doesn't make any sense. What would be the reason for "eliminating" the fish in high mountain lakes??
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis
Trail Blazer/HiLaker



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 1570 | TRs
Location: Silverdale, WA
Brian Curtis
  Top

Trail Blazer/HiLaker
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 8:26 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Because the National Park Service's mission is to preserve native species that are in conflict with introduced fish. But beyond that general ideal, we now know that when fish overpopulate lakes, as they are likely to do when they can naturally reproduce, they can harm native amphibians and alter zooplankton populations. If they are not native to this area (i.e. eastern brook) they may be able to drop down stream and compete with native fish populations. Fish stocked periodically in low densities can co-exist with native species. So the ONP's priorities will be to remove excessively over-reproducing populations that are doing the most damage.

National park lakes were stocked until the early seventies. It was the release of the Leopold Report that kicked off the changes in management that lead to a cessation of fish stocking.

--------------
that elitist from silverdale wanted to tell me that all carnes are bad--Studebaker Hoch
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 11141 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
  Top

><((((°>
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 9:46 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
80skeys wrote:
What would be the reason for "eliminating" the fish in high mountain lakes??

The founding legislation which created Olympic National Park charges the National Park Service with "protecting and preserving the native flora and fauna".
To that end, a concerted effort is being made throughout the National Park system to remove and eliminate any and all non-indigenous species of both flora and fauna.

This includes, but is not limited to, non-native fish.

In the larger picture, getting rid of the fish in the upland lakes is a relatively easy task.
The bigger challenge is eliminating the non-native invasive species of introduced plants which have invaded National Parks.

As to the "why", it's because what makes those places unique and special enough to be designated as National Parks is that they are different from the homogenized, compromised, and adulterated American landscape outside the Park borders.

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
80skeys
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Jul 2019
Posts: 116 | TRs

80skeys
  Top

Member
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 10:39 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
So really what you're saying is that they screwed up by ever stocking the lakes in the first place. I can buy that, but the thing that still doesn't make sense is: some of the downstream rivers which have native fish (steelhead) come from the high mountain lakes in the Park, which means those lakes had to have had native fish at some point.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 11141 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
  Top

><((((°>
PostTue Jul 28, 2020 11:04 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
huh?

I can't comment as to whether or not the previous management of the upland lakes was a "screw up", other than to submit that introducing any non-indigenous species of flora or fauna into an ecosystem brings with it unintended, unforeseen, and (more often than not) negative consequences.
I would posit that at the time it was being done, those in the position of making those decisions believed it was the correct course of action. On the flip side, there were people who believed that dropping mountain goats onto the Olympic Peninsula was the right thing to do, and there were those who believed moving the mongoose to Hawaii was the right thing to do, and there were those who believed hauling rabbits to Australia was the right thing to do.

As to the steelhead trout, they spawn in the upper reaches of cold-water streams, not lakes. With the exception of the "kokanee", all anadromous salmonid species are denizens of rivers and streams, from egg to spawning adult.

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis
Trail Blazer/HiLaker



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 1570 | TRs
Location: Silverdale, WA
Brian Curtis
  Top

Trail Blazer/HiLaker
PostWed Jul 29, 2020 6:47 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
80skeys wrote:
the thing that still doesn't make sense is: some of the downstream rivers which have native fish (steelhead) come from the high mountain lakes in the Park, which means those lakes had to have had native fish at some point.

Just the opposite. Fish colonized Puget Sound basin lakes, streams, and rivers from the ocean up after the glaciers retreated from the last ice age. They could only populate areas not blocked by barrier falls.

--------------
that elitist from silverdale wanted to tell me that all carnes are bad--Studebaker Hoch
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > questions about fishing Olympic National Park/Forest
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy