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seahuskies
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PostWed Jan 13, 2021 8:38 pm 
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Looking for tips or suggestions for a winter backpacking tent.

Generally near tree line or slightly above at spots like Artist Point, Mazama Ridge, Mowich Lake, Diamond Head.

I primarily go out for photography in the winter, so I am not planning on being out on days with dumping snow and more likely to be out on clearer days. Being on the shoulder of a storm isn't out of the question so being able to handle some precip would be nice.

I suspect being wind worthy is likely more of a factor since that can happen anytime.

Would prefer to keep it around 5 or 6 lbs since I am lugging 12lbs of camera gear and my wife can't always make it to share the weight.

Some possible tents I have gathered:

Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 Expedition
- Looks pretty robust but a little concerned about how well it could handle a snow load

MSR Access 3
- Even lighter than the Copper Spur, but worried it would be even weaker in wind + snow.

REI Arete ASL
- Good price but I've had not so great experiences with the REI branded products


Big Agnes Shield 3
/ Rab Latok Mountain 3
- Much more bomber, but I suspect 2 wall is better for my needs?

Pyramid tent like MLD Duomid
- Seems ideal for snow shedding but can pyramid tents really handle high winds? Considering the weight of the pyramid tents, it almost seems too good to be true. I just feel skeptical that a single pole can handle wind on an ridge?

Hilleberg Nallo 3
- pricey but seems like it could check all the boxes unless it’s overkill?
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Randito
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PostWed Jan 13, 2021 11:01 pm 
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seahuskies wrote:
I just feel skeptical that a single pole can handle wind on an ridge?

That skeptism is approprtaiate.     If you are using a minimalist shelter like a pyramid tarp/tent, site selection is far more critical.   

But in general pitching any tent on a ridge during the winter months, except under unusually calm conditions it is a sub optimal choice.

IME single wall tents are colder than double (and triple) wall winter tents and single wall tents can get much more frost formation.

I recall a week long April trip to Wyoming with overnight lows around 0F -- we had a four person triple wall tent and a two person single wall tent.  we rotated between tents duing the week.   The single wal tent was 10F colder inside, but more importantly, exiting the tent in the morning required great care to avoid creating a snow shower in tent by knocking the 1/2 thick layer of frost loose from the inside of the single wall.
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Downhill
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PostThu Jan 14, 2021 8:45 pm 
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I think Randito has some very good advice in his post.

I haven't used any of the tents you have listed, but I would offer another option to consider.  After owning a few REI tents, an expensive Northface tent, and several other brands, I have settled on tents from Sierra Designs, of which I have a few now of different size and purpose.  What I like about their tents is a minimum of fuss, very good construction, durability, thoughtful designs, ease-of-use, and lightweight. They are not the cheapest or the most expensive, but from my experience of using several models over the past 25+ years, they give me the best value = functionality per dollar.

If I was in your shoes, I would check out their 3-person, 4-season tent Convert 3  .  While you might find a better choice in your search, I'd at least give this a look.
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Schroder
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PostFri Jan 15, 2021 3:03 pm 
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I agree with Randito's points on single vs double-wall. I've spent many winter nights in a tent and the last thing you want is frost on the inside surface.

I absolutely hate pyramid tents like the Duomid, not only for the pole in the middle but I believe they are inherently worse in high winds. I was in an early version that REI sold for years (the McKinley), that was custom reinforced and there was no way to keep the pole from going through the top in high winds, which I had the displeasure of experiencing at 16,000 feet on Denali.

The domes are fine but make sure they have sleeved rather than clip attachments to the poles for winter use.

I prefer a Quonset style for winter use. I have a Hilleberg Keron I bought only for winter and it would be comfortable anywhere on earth. The Nallo is basically similar and much like the Stephenson classic design. These require a little more consideration in pitching into the wind and they aren't freestanding like a dome.
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brineal
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PostFri Jan 15, 2021 4:02 pm 
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seahuskies wrote:
Looking for tips or suggestions for a winter backpacking tent.

Generally near tree line or slightly above at spots like Artist Point, Mazama Ridge, Mowich Lake, Diamond Head.

I primarily go out for photography in the winter, so I am not planning on being out on days with dumping snow and more likely to be out on clearer days. Being on the shoulder of a storm isn't out of the question so being able to handle some precip would be nice.

I suspect being wind worthy is likely more of a factor since that can happen anytime.

Would prefer to keep it around 5 or 6 lbs since I am lugging 12lbs of camera gear and my wife can't always make it to share the weight.

Some possible tents I have gathered:

Big Agnes Copper Spur HV 3 Expedition
- Looks pretty robust but a little concerned about how well it could handle a snow load

MSR Access 3
- Even lighter than the Copper Spur, but worried it would be even weaker in wind + snow.

REI Arete ASL
- Good price but I've had not so great experiences with the REI branded products


Big Agnes Shield 3
/ Rab Latok Mountain 3
- Much more bomber, but I suspect 2 wall is better for my needs?

Pyramid tent like MLD Duomid
- Seems ideal for snow shedding but can pyramid tents really handle high winds? Considering the weight of the pyramid tents, it almost seems too good to be true. I just feel skeptical that a single pole can handle wind on an ridge?

Hilleberg Nallo 3
- pricey but seems like it could check all the boxes unless it’s overkill?

Hilleberg discourages the use of "pricey" they prefer "valuable."
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moonspots
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PostFri Jan 15, 2021 6:12 pm 
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brineal wrote:
Hilleberg discourages the use of "pricey" they prefer "valuable."

I'd say both are applicable. I have one and it's quite the valuable asset. When I was tent shopping, I was quite certain that I wanted a self standing tent, but the salesman mentioned that for where I had in mind (Rainier), setting up a tent, especially a free standing type in the wind, can be quite a disaster when it catches it and blows it onto the next glacier. He showed me how to setup the Hilleberg in the wind, and use the wind to assist in the setup. And, there is no frost inside.  up.gif

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Franco
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PostMon Jan 18, 2021 2:46 pm 
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Just because a tent is labelled "freestanding" it does not mean that it should not be staked down.
In fact setting up single wall inner poles tents , Bibler style, the easiest way of doing it is to stake the corners first , then get in and insert the poles.
However there could be  two wall freestanding tents that may not let you stake the inner down before you put the fly on top. Those would  indeed be  a problem to set up on windy days.
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SwitchbackFisher
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PostWed Jan 20, 2021 1:53 pm 
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I am just saying I was issued this in a BDU print while in the service. Its stupid warm by the time I add a pad and 25degree down bag. I used it well into the teens before no issues. If you can't have something freeze it goes in the bivy with me and boots go in a dry bag inside with me as well. If it's snowing pretty good just wake up and shake the snow loose every now and again. One downfall is in winter about halfway through the night I bring my head in to keep warmer, if you get claustrophobic this is not for you.

https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/us-military-gore-tex-bivy-cover-army-digital-used?a=1165555&szc=000&clrc=000&pm2d=CSE-SPG-15-PLA&utm_medium=PLA&utm_source=Google&utm_campaign=CI&gclid=CjwKCAiAxp-ABhALEiwAXm6Iybh4kpiCfSEc0BRxYM1-ywXs9v1_TAf76OrWndI2vsfW6AXv2A94JBoCBAwQAvD_BwE

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brineal
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PostSat Jan 23, 2021 12:14 am 
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moonspots wrote:
I'd say both are applicable. I have one and it's quite the valuable asset. When I was tent shopping, I was quite certain that I wanted a self standing tent, but the salesman mentioned that for where I had in mind (Rainier), setting up a tent, especially a free standing type in the wind, can be quite a disaster when it catches it and blows it onto the next glacier. He showed me how to setup the Hilleberg in the wind, and use the wind to assist in the setup. And, there is no frost inside.  up.gif

They are amazing equipment and my quip about “valuable” is from Petra Hilleberg herself!

I really respect that Hilleberg supports backcountry, from peakbagging, expeditions,  mountaineering to hunting. 👍🏻
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