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iron
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iron
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PostFri Mar 19, 2021 9:46 am 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_Ranges

i've spent the last 15 years in the PNW and have a good sense of clothing and layering and what works here. as i transition to the canadian rockies, i'm sure i'll need to tweak the gear setup. aside from it being colder occasionally, anyone have input on different layering strategies?

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Schroder
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PostFri Mar 19, 2021 9:53 am 
iron wrote:
i'll need to tweak the gear setup. aside from it being colder occasionally

You don't have the moisture/rain to deal with so the shift would be to thermal layers

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iron
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PostFri Mar 19, 2021 9:56 am 
fleece? down? wool?

i know when i have visited colorado springs in the winter, the colder temps cut right through my current (non-mountain) layers.

when i moved to seattle in 2004, i remember the dampness cutting through my then-Wisconsin layers as well.

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Schroder
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PostFri Mar 19, 2021 1:14 pm 
My preference is lightweight merino wool base layer with light fleece next & down shell for subfreezing temps. and would switch out the down to wind protection in warmer temps.  I have a pair of climbing pants that I've had for many years and bought in Canada that's a windproof blend of merino wool and spandex. I've been using them here lately to ski in.

But you can't base it on me because I'm twice your age and probably always have more clothing than you would use.

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Randito
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PostFri Mar 19, 2021 10:58 pm 
I was in Alberta a couple of seasons ago -- colder and drier during the winter.    In the summer, thunderstorms are more common -- so you still want something 100% waterproof -- but you might only need to wear it for an hour or two instead of all day.

During my Alberta trip the weather was pretty favorable -- didn't really think about it too much -- other than "some new snow would be nice"   The amount of sun exposure somewhat offset the colder temps -- for the most part I think i mearly wore an extra mid-wieght base layer and I did wear my thick mittens more frequently than I would gloves in the PNW.

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the1mitch
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PostTue Mar 30, 2021 9:27 am 
In my experience a windshell over whatever you need under it is a smart choice for sure. I would add something hooded and a face mask/balaclava. Winds can be brutal! Ditto the merino.

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DadFly
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PostSun Jun 06, 2021 1:43 pm 
I spent my first 30 years in Missoula and surrounding mountains. Then I moved to the PNW. On a cold day in Montana the lack of humidity makes it much easier to stay warm while moving.
On the bottom I like a light pair of stretchy pants. Sometimes a light pair of merino wool long johns and a light baggy gortex layer are all I usually wear. For really cold weather I add medium weight primaloft pants.
On the top I start with a light wicking layer then light wool and a wind breaker with a hood. I usually throw in a very light primaloft jacket too. I have a gortex rain/wind layer to put over the top. A nice down jacket with a hood is nice for when I stop.
Feet always have wool socks (medium or heavy in cold), light waterproof hiking boots and gaiters.
Gloves of three weights.
Pile balaclava and medium wool hat.

In the pnw I replace down with primaloft and am more likely to throw in a dry base layer for camp. Also a Seattle sombrero.

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