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Anne Elk
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Anne Elk
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PostTue May 04, 2021 11:21 pm 
Wasn't sure whether to post this here or in the Saloon.  A fascinating NPR Fresh Air interview: Trees Talk to Each Other

Obligate fungal relationships and chemical signalling ... pretty interesting stuff.  The interviewee, Dr. Simard, is "local" (Nelson, BC, teaches at UBC).  Her professional trajectory (starting out in the woods as a logging company employee) is interesting, too.   Her book.  It would be great if her discoveries could be incorporated into forest management practice.

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"There are yahoos out there.  Its why we cant have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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timberghost
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PostWed May 05, 2021 6:09 am 
Renewable resource!!

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moonspots
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moonspots
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PostThu May 06, 2021 7:22 am 
Anne Elk wrote:
...pretty interesting stuff. The interviewee, Dr. Simard, is "local" (Nelson, BC, teaches at UBC). Her professional trajectory (starting out in the woods as a logging company employee) is interesting, too. Her book. It would be great if her discoveries could be incorporated into forest management practice.

Yes it is (interesting), and yes it would be GREAT if forest management practices would be dictated more by science and not just (short sighted) economics. For as long as I can recall (sneaking up on 7 decades now) I've despised clear-cutting in the PNW. Primarily due to the visual, but I also suspected it was a not so smart way to do it. Now there is a growing body of evidence to support this.

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"Out, OUT you demons of Stupidity"! - St Dogbert, patron Saint of Technology
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timberghost
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PostThu May 06, 2021 9:29 am 
There are benefits to clear cutting when done in a controlled manner.

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brineal
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PostThu May 06, 2021 9:42 am 
moonspots wrote:
Anne Elk wrote:
...pretty interesting stuff. The interviewee, Dr. Simard, is "local" (Nelson, BC, teaches at UBC). Her professional trajectory (starting out in the woods as a logging company employee) is interesting, too. Her book. It would be great if her discoveries could be incorporated into forest management practice.

Yes it is (interesting), and yes it would be GREAT if forest management practices would be dictated more by science and not just (short sighted) economics. For as long as I can recall (sneaking up on 7 decades now) I've despised clear-cutting in the PNW. Primarily due to the visual, but I also suspected it was a not so smart way to do it. Now there is a growing body of evidence to support this.


Pretty interesting info about the lives of trees.

The method of harvest depends on a variety of factors and is planned and submitted on by the forester in charge of the sale.

Landowners stand to gain no benefit by damaging their lands and yes, the body of knowledge has come a long way and is ever improving along with equipment technology.  There will always be some impact, this is the tradeoff of natural resources, but with around a 99% material utilization rate once the trunk hits the ground, forest products are pretty much a shining example.

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Goats Know
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Goats Know
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PostThu May 06, 2021 3:55 pm 
Thanks for sharing this Anne!  Interesting program.  I am definitely going to buy her book.

I believe Dr. Simard was the inspiration for one of the characters in Richard Powers novel "The Overstory".  If you read the book the similarities are obvious.

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Here on this mountaintop...Woahoho...I got some wild, wild life  - Talking Heads
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Kim Brown
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PostTue May 25, 2021 9:28 am 
I haven't listed to the podcast yet, but checked out the book reviews on Amazon. She has some impressive reviewers, including Robin Wall Kimmerer (she is so wonderful!).

People have been hammering industry for decades; soils matter; hydrology, bugs, fungus, lichen, interruption of wind pattern - everything has to do with everything else. It seems to have been an enlightenment in the last several decades, yet the concept was known for thousands of years - but we had forgotten.

Thoughtful, private landowners have lots of resources; conservation easements, and the Forest and Fish program, for instance. More and more of them are learning and doing.

Thanks for the links!

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" I'm really happy about this! I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  oldgranola, NWHs outdoors advocate.
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