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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Niece of Alvy Moore
PostSun Feb 27, 2005 9:49 pm 
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I have a copy of a topo map from the 1920's that shows exact locations of the homesteads and schools in what are now the Schaake and Colockum WLR areas. While Kohler Springs (spelled Coaler on the map!) is easily recognizable today, evidence of many of the other homesteads is gone.  Occasionally you'll see a flat area that looks like it was cleared and grasses planted, at times you see a 70-80 year old lilac tree out there, or rose bushes, but other than that, there's nothing left.

Anyway, the map I have shows about 10 schoolhouses and half a dozen or so homesteads.  I think the area was settled during a time of a decade or so of wet weather, and pioneers appeared, hoping to make a living; but the homesteads were abandoned when the true Central Washington weather cycle came back.  Enter the great lobby for Grand Coulee Dam.  I'll have to double-check my source for that.

Of all the old timers on this site, I'm hoping for some first-hand stories or recollections from grandparents.  I believe BarePaw's family was from that area...? (I may be wrong, believe it or not).

I'm looking forward to taking this map out there come spring, and wandering around the billowing grasses.

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

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touron
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 12:06 am 
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Quark, you may be interested in this King County Journal article on company towns.    I saw the article in a newspaper dug up from the back of my sister's car, which had also developed some historical character before its recent icy wreck...there are probably other historical artifacts in it for those who wish to make the trip to the Marysville junkyard.  Good photos in the article, but unfortunately not in the link.

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kleet
meat tornado



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meat tornado
PostMon Feb 28, 2005 7:55 am 
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Kittitas County History may have some good links to help you on your way.

Also, if you haven't stopped before, Olmstead Place is worth a visit. It's a homestead from 1875 that the descendents donated to the State. It's right next to I-90 just east of Ellensburg.

Quote:
In 1875 Samuel and Sarah Olmstead came to Ellensburg from Seattle. They brought their three children Phil, Clara, and John. That fall and winter he built a cabin on his 160-acre lot. Coleman Creek supplied fresh water for animals and irrigation. In 1877 and 78 he planted apple, sour cherry, plum, sweet crabapple trees. He also planted currants, gooseberries, raspberries, and rhubarb. Many of them still produce today. During the Indian wars in 1877 to 78, neighbors from isolated homes would come to stay at the Olmstead cabin for protection.


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salish
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 8:57 am 
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Quark, I am interested in this because I hunt upland birds in both of these areas, especially Whisky Dick Mountain, and you can tell many if not most of the plateau areas were once fenced and owned by private landowners at one time, which made it's way into state and federal hands. I'm curious as to what you will dig up.

Cliff

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greg
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 10:35 am 
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Quark, don't now about white settlements, but I do know that area was hunted for centuries by the natives for deer, elk and bighorn sheep, and they also dug roots and bulbs there in spring. I've found stone flakes in that region and the reservoir behind Priest Rapids Dam of course flooded and drowned forever dozens of rock art panels, a few of which are preserved at Gingko Petrified Forest. This was the country of the Wanapum dreamer-prophet Smohalla, who refused to sign treaties and urged his people to stick to the old ways.
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salish
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 11:40 am 
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greg wrote:
Quark, don't now about white settlements, but I do know that area was hunted for centuries by the natives for deer, elk and bighorn sheep, and they also dug roots and bulbs there in spring. I've found stone flakes in that region and the reservoir behind Priest Rapids Dam of course flooded and drowned forever dozens of rock art panels, a few of which are preserved at Gingko Petrified Forest. This was the country of the Wanapum dreamer-prophet Smohalla, who refused to sign treaties and urged his people to stick to the old ways.

Greg, are you from Wanapum? Are you a tribal member? I ran into a Wanapum tribal member at the NCAI congress in Ft. Lauderdale last October.
Cliff

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My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.
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greg
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 12:26 pm 
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That was not me Salish, and I'm not from Wanapum. I've just read a bit of history about Central Washington and have explored that area.
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Damian
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 2:34 pm 
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My grandparents are from Wenatchee.  My grandmother had all kinds of stories about travelling over Colockum pass back in the day.
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hikerjo
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PostMon Feb 28, 2005 6:01 pm 
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I have hiked every square inch (well not quite) clown.gif  of the Colockum and know where two World War II ariplane crash sites are, Indian Campsites, and lots of Homsteads, and mining operations.  O, I even know the exact place where they dug all the peterfied logs out and stuff.  Interesting country, I love it there.
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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Niece of Alvy Moore
PostMon Feb 28, 2005 10:33 pm 
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Thanks for info, folks.  Craig, any time you want to cough up some locations, be my guest to do so!  I've seen petrified wood back there, too.  Ever wonder what scared it? (Sorry, dumb joke.  Naw, actually it's quite clever - I didn't make it up).

There are lots of springs in the area, so those were typical places for little ranches.  A couple of the ranches are right on the Columbia River.  There were 2 ferry crossings between Whiskey Dick creek and Vulcan.  I wonder what the crossings were like, pre-dam era.

I was right in that after several years of unusually wet weather, some folks were convinced it'd be a good place to settle, but irrigation was already in the backs of their minds, and most knew it was typically a dry area.  Crops changed according to the weather pattern.  Promise of a great railroad to help them get their goods to market attracted them as well.

Because of the 2 ferry crossings and the Ellensburg- to-Wenatchee-Road (Colockum), the area was populated enough to warrant a dozen or so schoolhouses.  They could have been tiny, perhaps only one or two families attended each school.

I really haven't had time to do any research, but plan to spend time in Sea Public Lib and the Suzzallo in the next few weeks (I can't get over to the Whiskey Dick area until after tax season is over).

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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hikerjo
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PostTue Mar 01, 2005 12:01 am 
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Sometime soon (like next week or the week after) I am heading out there with an anthropologist to visit a large cave I found about 7 years ago, and kept secret all this time.  When I first found it, I kicked the side of the dirt and out plopped a piece of string, Indian...  Hopefully we will find out what else may be there.  I have also found many other Indian sites, which include large ash piles with shells scattered in them, large areas with rock chippings, etc.  Also, in just about every major canyon you will find a homestead.  There are places that my Dad and I used to go to in the right season to go get appricots and walnuts, that are left over from the homesteads, still surviring.  They are major old trees.  If you ever come across a large deep pit heading out for the river, that would be where they dreged for gold.  Remember, the water level is currently a lot higher, so its amazing to think that they most likly dreged from the main river all the way up to the current water levels.  These troughs are in almost every major cannyon.  Someone would not go through all that work for nothing, I wonder what they found.  I have also been told by a an old timer friend of mine about a china mining camp in the area, where supposedly there are still glass opemium vials. I looked for it but never found it.  And, like I said, I know of three airplane crash sites in the area.  A B-17, P-38, and a modern day A-6.  There is tons of history in those hills.

They used to run steam boats up the river.  Yes, there were several crossings.  The one just north of Vantage was owned by if I remember correctly, Fred Hinman.  My old timer friend used to know him before they died.
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greg
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PostTue Mar 01, 2005 7:55 am 
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Crag, I believe China Bar, where Chinese used to pan the sands for gold and was the site of a tribal attack on the miners, is downstream on the Columbia, in the reach. Might have been some activity up there though too I suppose. Advise tight lips on the cave and other prehistoric stuff lest the relic hunters and vandals get there first...
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hikerjo
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PostTue Mar 01, 2005 8:23 am 
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I am ok with saying what I did because it is a gigantic area.  I am good about keeping locations quite.   paranoid.gif
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umphtydunkie
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PostFri Apr 01, 2005 1:54 pm 
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OK, I'm suprised no one else asked the question. Does anyone know where the name Whisky Dick came from? I think I'll look more into this area. I really enjoy Pacific Northwest History. Knowing the history of the areas really adds to the hikes as well.
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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Niece of Alvy Moore
PostFri Apr 01, 2005 2:13 pm 
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I b'lieve it's a guys nickname.  The area has some whimsical names like Jumpoff Joe Ridge.

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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