Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Written in the Snows by Lowell Skoog
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kiliki
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kiliki
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PostWed Jan 05, 2022 1:40 pm 
Has there been a thread about this book yet? I am very much enjoying it. I think anyone interested in the history of outdoor recreation here--not just skiing--would like it.

https://www.seattletimes.com/entertainment/books/with-written-in-the-snows-lowell-skoog-pens-a-new-history-of-pacific-northwest-skiing/

Some of the anecdotes are just terrific. The Silver Skis race, which involved a mass start at Camp Muir and a race to Paradise in the 1930s...the description was hilarious. Everyone was bunched so tightly no one could turn, so they straightlined it until they nearly all crashed and ended up in the yard sale of all yard sales, pieces of which are still being found.

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Kim Brown
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PostThu Jan 06, 2022 10:14 am 
Wow, thanks for the recommendation. Mr. Skoog is awesome.

I'm #38 in line for the book at KCLS smile.gif and they're ordering 6 more copies to put into circulation.

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"..living on the east side of the Sierra world be ideal - except for harsher winters and the chance of apocalyptic fires burning the whole area."

Bosterson, NWHiker's marketing expert
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Snowdog
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PostThu Jan 06, 2022 11:00 am 
I got a copy for Christmas! biggrin.gif

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'we don't have time for a shortcut'
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kiliki
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PostFri Jan 07, 2022 4:47 pm 
Mountaineers members get a 20% discount when ordered through Mountaineers Books!

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HitTheTrail
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PostFri Jan 07, 2022 6:55 pm 
My daughter and son in law gave me a copy for Christmas. I am not a real fan of books anymore. I do a lot of reading, but most of it is online because things tend to get summarized and shortened.

However, that book seems like the kind that can be read in stand alone segments so that may help me get through it without getting discouraged by the length. So far I am finding it outstanding.

BTW, do people who write books get paid by the word? Why would anyone write a 500-600 page book that could easily be presented in less than 100 pages and keep the reader's interest? I read a lot of nonfiction science type stuff and when I see an interesting book the first thing I do is lift it and check the number of pages. If it is more than a couple hundred, I go on line and google the subject and read the abstract.
YMMV

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Randito
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PostSat Jan 08, 2022 12:06 am 
HitTheTrail wrote:
BTW, do people who write books get paid by the word?

Not by the word,  but something under a 100 pages is a pamphlet and everyone expects those to be free.

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kiliki
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kiliki
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PostSat Jan 08, 2022 2:58 pm 
Quote:
Why would anyone write a 500-600 page book that could easily be presented in less than 100 pages and keep the reader's interest?

Plenty of people manage to read longer books and stay interested. If they didn't, there wouldn't be a market for them, and publishers wouldn't pay authors for them.

The author needs time to provide context, support their argument, etc etc. A hundred pages might get you conclusions, but not the context and evidence to know if the author has done solid research and come to good/supportable conclusions, or, is full of bs.

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neek
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PostSat Jan 08, 2022 3:33 pm 
Apologies to Mr. Skoog for the thread drift.  It looks like a great book - and the perfect length, especially considering all the photos.

Indeed, nonfiction authors can be pushed by publishers to pad shorter manuscripts, because small books aren't taken as seriously by the public and don't stand out on the shelves.  (Likewise, too-long books can be pared back or split into multiple volumes so that people aren't too intimidated.)  Readers who don't have time for longer books often find value in Blinkist and other services that provide concise summaries.  Of course authors who self-publish have more freedom.

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Malachai Constant
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PostSat Jan 08, 2022 7:25 pm 
Nonfiction books often have long lists of footnotes, appendices, conclusions, updates, etc. Casual readers can ignore them. To researchers and critics they are often the most useful part. This especially applies to legal briefs, and research papers. The back pages of Becky's volumes were often he most useful parts.

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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Snowshovel
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PostSun Jan 09, 2022 2:41 pm 
Not counting the appendices at the back, 220-310 pages is the sweet spot for me

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Waterman
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PostSat Jan 15, 2022 5:42 pm 
Nice to read about the early pioneers of PNW skiing in the not too distant past.

What caught my attention on pages 210 -211 is a reference to the "Gunnar turn". A maneuver linking tele turns without changing the lead ski.

Can't wait to try it, pray I don't tear up whats left of my right knee.

Anyone know or heard of this?

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Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by. And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost
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HitTheTrail
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PostSat Jan 15, 2022 7:35 pm 
Actually, I think my comment on book length was misinterpreted. It was not directed specifically at Lowell Sloog's book at all. Just long books in general. As neek says, Lowell's book is about right considering all the photos. And I am finding it interesting as I pick it up and read a chapter now and then.

A geoscience friend I used to work with recently sent me an email recommending I read 'America Before' by Graham Hancock, it's around 600 pages. It is one of those books I got bogged down in and stopped reading about a third of the way through.

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