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BillyHorton
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BillyHorton
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PostSun Mar 20, 2022 10:54 pm 
Hi everyone! Im planning on training my dog to hike with me next time. So, Im here asking for advice and suggestions on which gears I should prepare for my dog. Id really appreciate your help and also love to hear your story if you take your pets on the way with you too.

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Randito
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Randito
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PostMon Mar 21, 2022 9:58 am 
I think the two most important bits of equipment are a leash no longer than six feet,  a good supply of poop bags and a way of carrying filled poop bags with you for the entire duration of your hike.  On dry hikes you'll want some sort of bowl so you can share  your water with your pup.

Training your dog to have good manners is essential.   This means no straining on the leash while walking.   No pulling on the leash to try to approach other dogs or hikers and no growling, barking or whining at other dogs, wildlife or hikers.

Don't be a selfish jerk that let's their dog run amuck, chase wildlife, bound up to other hikers with you yelling from afar "don't worry he's friendly" and definitely don't be one of those people that picks up their dog's poop in a plastic bag and leaves on the side of the trail to pick up on the way back and the blasts right past it leaving it to the poop bag fairy to clean up.

If you want to let your dog off leash,  you're going to spend significant time training your dog to to return on voice command.  Control needs to be good enough that your dog will return reliably even when something as interesting as a deer, skunk or porcupine has caught their attention.     The issues with them chasing a skunk or porky are obvious,  but if they chase a deer ,  you could be searching for your dog for days.  I found having a bag of small bits beef jery in my pocket was useful for focusing my dog's attention.   But not all dogs respond to the same reward,   the most generally effective reward is lots of praise for good behavior.

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Waterman
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PostMon Mar 21, 2022 10:29 am 
Voice control is of paramount importance.

--------------
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by. And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost
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Bowregard
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PostMon Mar 21, 2022 12:49 pm 
It makes things a lot easier if they learn to "go" on command. Our Cocker was trained to "roam" early on by the breeder and we reinforced that. Be careful which word you select though - Bogie was so automatic he would let go anywhere even if I used "roam" in casual conversation  shakehead.gif

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ScottP
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PostThu Apr 21, 2022 11:45 am 
Be aware of your dogs limitations.
Work up to longer/rougher hikes to condition your pooch.
Paw pads can be damaged by rough trail surfaces to the point the dog can no longer walk and would need to be carried back to the car.

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Navy salad
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PostThu Apr 21, 2022 12:29 pm 
ScottP wrote:
Be aware of your dogs limitations.
Work up to longer/rougher hikes to condition your pooch.
Paw pads can be damaged by rough trail surfaces to the point the dog can no longer walk and would need to be carried back to the car.

Good advice, which applies to dogs & people. I once ran into a solo backpacker carrying his large dog (plus his backpack) down the trail back to his car (with probably at least 8-10 miles to go) because the dog's feet were badly damaged by the rough trails. And dogs need to get in shape for significant hiking, just like people.

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Celticclimber
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PostThu Apr 28, 2022 3:55 pm 
I was a 'doggie nurse' for > 22yrs. For whatever that is worth here.

I totally agree with the comments written by Navy Salad.
If you use those doggie bootees: Not only will your dog lose them.
But it's feet will never get tough enough for rough terrain.
My husky has been on volcanic rock routes ( climbed South Sisters as well as many others).
With out a problem.
HOWEVER.
If your pooch does cut a pad. It will bleed like crazy. And they are
very hard to fix. But that has never  happened to me in over 45 yrs of
hiking with my trail buddy.

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Live every day like you will die to-marrow.
For some day that will be true.
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texasbb
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texasbb
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PostThu Apr 28, 2022 5:45 pm 
Celticclimber wrote:
But that has never  happened to me in over 45 yrs of
hiking with my trail buddy.

Now that's canine longevity!   lol.gif

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