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PostFri Jun 17, 2022 6:05 pm 
Friday June 17, 2022 16:52 PDT WDFW NEWS RELEASE Emergency measures deployed to control invasive European green crabs in Washington waters WDFW implements Incident Command System for coordination with tribes, state and federal agencies, and non-governmental partners including shellfish growers. OLYMPIA – Deployment of emergency measures to control invasive European green crabs on the Washington Coast and at sites within the Salish Sea is well underway, including the implementation of an Incident Command System (ICS) to facilitate statewide coordination between various agencies, tribes, and partners. The Washington State Emergency Management Division assigned European green crab response as a formal mission on April 18, 2022. After meeting with other state and federal agencies, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Director Kelly Susewind formally implemented the ICS strategy on May 5 in delegating authority to Allen Pleus, WDFW’s Aquatic Invasive Species Policy Coordinator, to serve as Incident Commander. The ICS also identifies Coastal and Salish Sea management branches. The European Green Crab (Carcinus maenas) is a globally damaging invasive species that poses a threat to native shellfish, eelgrass, and estuary habitat critical for salmon and many other species. On Jan. 19, 2022, Governor Jay Inslee issued emergency proclamation 22-02 to address the exponential increase in European green crab populations detected within the Lummi Nation’s Sea Pond and outer coast areas. The order directed WDFW to begin implementation of emergency measures to prevent the crab’s permanent establishment and expansion. At the request of Governor Inslee, WDFW, Washington Invasive Species Council, several Native American tribes, and other state and non-governmental partners, the Washington State Legislature appropriated $8.568 million in funding for European green crab emergency measures in the 2022 Supplemental Operating Budget, which was signed on March 31. This amount includes pass-through funding for the Lummi Nation, Makah Tribe, and partners. The Legislature and Governor had previously provided WDFW $783,000 in a one-time proviso in 2020 and $2.3 million in ongoing funding in 2021 to control European green crabs, but the amounts were not sufficient to control growing infestations. With the emergency order and funding, WDFW has been working with tribes, other state and federal agencies, as well as shellfish growers and private tidelands owners to establish a coordinated response, hire and deploy personnel, and purchase and distribute equipment to areas with known green crab infestations. Three boats, nearly a dozen new employees, and more than 700 specialized traps have been deployed this spring, with more on the way. Through the efforts of WDFW Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) staff, the Lummi Nation, Makah Tribe, Shoalwater Bay Tribe, Willapa-Grays Harbor Oyster Growers Association, and other tribes, agencies, and partners, more than 64,000 European green crabs have been removed from Washington waters in 2022 as of June 11. Under the emergency order, regular updates are posted on this webpage. A European Green Crab Management Updates email list sign-up is also now available at wdfw.wa.gov/about/lists “Washington’s European green crab management efforts continue to ramp up this year with Governor Inslee issuing a statewide emergency proclamation and the Legislature authorizing new emergency funding resources,” said Pleus, the Incident Commander. “We’re now working to improve strategic coordination so that by working together, Washingtonians can control European green crabs with the goal that this invasive species does not harm our state’s environmental, economic or cultural resources.” Washington Sea Grant continues conducting early-detection monitoring throughout the Salish Sea and coastal bays, as well as research to better understand European green crabs and their range in Washington state. The Northwest Straits Commission is conducting monitoring and removal efforts in Whatcom and Skagit counties. WDFW provides support for both entities. Several Native American tribes, the Washington Department of Natural Resources and State Parks, federal entities including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, commercial shellfish growers, and private tidelands owners are also involved in European green crab monitoring and removal efforts on their lands. WDFW is working closely with the Washington Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) to establish a Multi-Agency Coordination (MAC) Group under the ICS structure, as well as to implement a new European green crab Emergency Measures Fund Program with $1,100,000 in funding available for interagency contracts to state, tribal, federal, and local governments. In addition, WDFW is implementing a European Green Crab Coastal Management Grant Program to be disbursed by the Pacific and Grays Harbor County conservation districts, with $675,000 in funding available for local, non-profit, or private entities that seek to conduct green crab removal. Permits, traps, and other support are also available for tidelands owners as supplies allow. A new sign with European green crab identification and reporting information for Washington marinas, boat ramps or beaches is available on WDFW’s website or by request. Native to western Europe, these shore crabs are typically found in shallow areas, estuaries, and mud flats, and may be present on both public and private tidelands. They arrived on the U.S. West Coast in San Francisco Bay by 1989 and were first detected on the Washington Coast in low numbers in 1998. Detection within the Salish Sea occurred at Sooke Basin, British Columbia in 2012, and then in the San Juan Islands and Padilla Bay in 2016. Beginning around 2018, state and federal agencies, tribes, and partners began to detect significant increases in European green crabs—potentially linked to warmer water conditions, especially in 2021—in areas including Willapa Bay, Grays Harbor, Makah Bay, and Lummi Bay. European crabs were recently detected in Hood Canal by Washington Sea Grant, and 13 additional crabs were removed from the Seabeck area through rapid response trapping led by WDFW. European green crabs have not been detected in Puget Sound south of Admiralty Inlet. If a member of the public finds a suspected European green crab or its shell in Washington, they are asked to take a picture and report it as soon as possible. Crab identification guides and an online reporting form are available at wdfw.wa.gov/greencrab. Reports can also be submitted using the WA Invasives app, or by contacting ais@dfw.wa.gov. At this time, WDFW is not asking the public to keep or kill suspected green crabs because they can be mistaken identification of native crabs. European green crab are classified as a Prohibited Level 1 Invasive Species in Washington, meaning they may not be possessed, introduced on or into a water body or property, or trafficked, without department authorization, a permit, or as otherwise provided by rule. Beachgoers, anglers, recreational crabbers, and others are asked not to tamper with European green crab traps, which are often deployed in shallow areas exposed at low tide and are typically identified with a bright orange buoy and an official tag or permit. More information is available at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/species-habitats/invasive/carcinus-maenas The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife works to preserve, protect and perpetuate fish, wildlife and ecosystems while providing sustainable fish and wildlife recreational and commercial opportunities. --WDFW-

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostFri Oct 07, 2022 9:18 am 
Thursday October 6, 2022 14:56 PDT WDFW NEWS RELEASE Fishing on most coastal rivers and tributaries for salmon and all game fish to close beginning Oct. 8 OLYMPIA – Fishing for salmon and all game fish is closing in most coastal rivers and tributaries beginning Saturday, Oct. 8 until further notice, fishery managers with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today. "Historic low flows this summer are creating conditions that limit fish movements and result in higher-than-expected harvest rates," said James Losee, WDFW Region 6 fish program manager. "These areas are closing to fishing until river conditions improve and salmon are able to reach the spawning grounds in adequate numbers." Around 50 coastal streams from the northern Olympic Peninsula coast to Willapa Bay are closing to salmon fishing and all game fish beginning Saturday, Oct. 8 until further notice. Anglers can find the list of specific rivers by checking the emergency regulations on the WDFW webpage. https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/emergency-rules Fishery managers plan to reopen when flows increase, or stock assessment information suggests that salmon are successfully migrating upstream. This conservation measure follows regulation changes in tribal comanagers fisheries. Additionally, the Olympic National Park Service has closed respective fisheries in associated waterbodies. https://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/fishing.htm Fishing is open in Grays Harbor's East Bay (Marine Area 2-2), Willapa Bay (Marine Area 2-1), and the Chehalis River downstream of Fuller Bridge. The Lower Willapa and Naselle rivers also remain open but for hatchery Chinook and hatchery coho only beginning Saturday, Oct. 8. Look under rules listed in the 2022-23 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for additional information. https://www.eregulations.com/washington/fishing/ Anglers should continue to check emergency regulations for new and changing seasons or sign up for email notifications at wdfw.wa.gov/about/lists. - WDFW -

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PostTue Oct 11, 2022 4:25 pm 
Tuesday October 11, 2022 15:24 PDT WDFW NEWS RELEASE WDFW seeks public comment on proposed rule for domestic sheep and goats on Department-managed lands Public invited to Dec. 1 virtual public hearing OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is inviting public comment on a proposed rule that would prohibit visitors bringing domestic sheep or goats onto wildlife area units of 12 WDFW-managed wildlife areas. The proposed rule is intended to reduce the risk the transmission of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (Movi), a type of bacteria that causes pneumonia and can be deadly to bighorn sheep. Past pneumonia outbreaks among bighorn sheep in Washington and other parts of the western United States have been linked to contact between wild sheep and domestic sheep or goats, which carry Movi but are unaffected by the bacteria. Pneumonia, caused by the Movi bacteria, can also reduce the survival rate of lambs for many years after an initial outbreak. There is no treatment for bighorn sheep, and no preventative vaccine. The proposed rule would apply to select wildlife area units of Asotin Creek, Chelan, Chief Joseph, Colockum, Columbia Basin, L.T. Murray, Oak Creek, Scotch Creek, Sinlahekin, Wells, Wenas, and W.T. Wooten wildlife areas. "We want to protect wild sheep while preserving opportunities for people who enjoy hiking and hunting with pack goats," said Joel Sisolak, WDFW lands planning, recreation and outreach section manager. "We are proposing a targeted approach to ensure those opportunities remain available in other parts of the state." The public is invited to comment on the proposed rule by submitting written comments at publicinput.com/SheepAndGoats102 ( https://publicinput.com/SheepAndGoats102 ), via email ( SheepAndGoats102@PublicInput.com ), or by mail to WDFW's Wildlife Program: PO Box 43200, Olympia, WA 98504. WDFW will accept comments until 11:59 p.m. Nov. 30. The public is also invited to attend a virtual hearing, scheduled for 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1 ( https://us06web.zoom.us/w/88201267221 ) in which WDFW Director Kelly Susewind will hear feedback and decide on the proposed rule. Respondents who wish to have their comments incorporated into the Dec. 1 meeting presentation should submit their comments by 8 a.m. Nov. 23. All members of the public are invited to share their diverse perspectives and participate in WDFW public feedback opportunities regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, language proficiency, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression, status as a veteran, or basis of disability. More information about the proposed rule is available at wdfw.wa.gov/about/regulations/development. -WDFW-

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PostMon Jun 12, 2023 8:53 am 
Monday June 12 2023 09:19 PDT WDFW NEWS RELEASE WDFW to seek public input on draft management plan for L.T. Murray Wildlife Area in Kittitas County Public invited to June 21 open house in Ellensburg OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will soon be looking for public input on a draft management plan for the L.T. Murray Wildlife Area, located in Kittitas County. The Department anticipates the draft document will be available online on June 16. The public is invited to join WDFW staff at an open house, scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 21, at the Armory Building at the Kittitas County Events Center, 901 E 7th Ave in Ellensburg to learn more and share feedback on the draft plan. The plan will guide habitat enhancements, shrubsteppe protection and restoration, wildlife management, forest health, wildfire prevention, public access and outdoor recreation, and other land management activities for the 118,300-acre L.T. Murray Wildlife Area for the next 10 years. “It’s important to us that as we plan for the future of the L.T. Murray we’re hearing from the broad community of people who cherish it most,” said Cynthia Wilkerson, WDFW Lands Division manager. “This open house and the public review process gives us another opportunity to do that.” The draft plan and additional details will be available on WDFW’s website on June 16. Between June 16 and July 14, members of the public can comment on the plan as part of a state environmental review process on the WDFW’s website, by email, or by mail to Lisa Wood, P.O. Box 43200, Olympia, WA 98504-3200. Comments will be accepted through July 14. The L.T. Murray Wildlife Area includes five wildlife area units and is managed to protect a diverse array of habitats and species. From the shrubsteppe hillsides and conifer forests to the meadows and water corridors of the Yakima basin, the area supports a broad array of fish and wildlife. The wildlife area provides critical winter range for deer and elk and big horn sheep habitat, and supports several rare, endangered, and culturally significant plants and animals. Public recreation opportunities in the wildlife area include hunting, camping, wildlife viewing, fishing, target shooting, motorized recreation on the Green Dot system, horseback riding, mountain biking, and hiking. -WDFW-

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostMon Jun 12, 2023 10:21 am 
Also prime spot for wolves and cougars

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PostMon Jul 31, 2023 4:05 am 
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PostSat Aug 26, 2023 11:19 am 
Wednesday, August 23, 2023 13:24 PDT WDFW News Release WDFW opens public comment period for black bear timber damage permit rule proposal OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has filed a proposed rule change to revise how the Department issues black bear timber damage depredation permits. The public is invited to submit comments about the proposed rule through Oct. 2. The proposal would provide a process for the Department to issue permits for individuals to lethally remove black bears in specific locations where black bears damage commercial timber. The proposed rule, if adopted, would identify how permits could be applied for, the conditions of the permits, and how the Department would manage applications. A copy of the rule making proposal is available on the WDFW website. The comment period opens Aug. 23 and the public can submit comments via web form, by email: black-bear-timber-damage@PublicInput.com , or by phone (855-925-2801, project code 5474). The public may also mail written comments to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife ATTN: Wildlife Program, PO Box 43200, Olympia, WA 98504. WDFW will accept in-person and virtual public comments on the proposed rule change at a public hearing during the Sept. 28-30 Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting in Yakima. Those interested in providing comments during the meeting should pre-register online. Information on how to pre-register will be made available on the Commission Meeting webpage. The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is tentatively scheduled to consider this rule making proposal on or after their October 2023 meeting. -WDFW-

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSat Aug 26, 2023 12:12 pm 
RE: WDFW press release of 08/23/23 (just above): full text of WAC 220-440-210 full text of WAC 23-17-125 Center for Biological Diversity (appellant) vs. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife and Western Forestry and Conservation Association
Quote:
CBD argues that the Department exceeded its statutory authority by promulgating rules that exceed the narrow exceptions of two voter initiatives that banned the use of bait, hounds, and body-gripping traps.
* unfortunately the text on the URL just above, for reasons I do not understand, is all jumbled up - disjointed - as though someone cut it up with scissors and just glued the pieces back together at random, so I am unfortunately not really able to make sense of it. Statement of concern regarding Bear Timber Depredation Management Program - Conservation Northwest May 24, 2017 While I do not ordinarily side with CBD or Conservation Northwest on anything, and the text in the appeal document cited above doesn't really paint a clear picture, it appears that WDFW did in fact exceed their statutory authority by "promulgating rules that exceed the narrow exceptions of two voter initiatives", one of which was I-655, an initiative that was overwhelmingly passed by a margin of 63% to 37% by the voters of the State of Washington. The initiative was signed into law in 1996. I do not recall the Supreme Court declaring it not in compliance with our State Constitution, as were all of chalatan Tim Eyman's initiatives, and the law has been on the books for a couple decades now. The question, for me, is who is calling the shots here? WDFW? Or the VOTERS of the State of Washington? Do we, or do we not, as the electorate, have the ability to pass initiatives into law? Yes or no? If it is the case that any State agency can simply make up new rules to circumvent the intent of voter-passed initiatives, of what value is our ability to put through voter initiatives in the State of Washington? I do not see this is a hunter/bear/tree issue, but rather one of legal principle. Looks to me like WDFW stepped out of their lane here. Mr. Workman, I would greatly appreciate your feedback on this one if you can enlighten us about any details I missed. I will forego submitting comment to WDFW until you give me your take on all this. Thank you very much. BK

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PostMon Aug 28, 2023 2:49 am 
Ski wrote:
The question, for me, is who is calling the shots here? WDFW? Or the VOTERS of the State of Washington? Do we, or do we not, as the electorate, have the ability to pass initiatives into law? Yes or no? If it is the case that any State agency can simply make up new rules to circumvent the intent of voter-passed initiatives, of what value is our ability to put through voter initiatives in the State of Washington?
Voter initiative is a LOUSY way to manage wildlife. Period. End of story. You cannot manage by emotion. And that is precisely what voter initiatives on wildlife issues do.

"The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted." - D.H. Lawrence
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PostMon Aug 28, 2023 5:38 am 
I cannot say that I disagree with you, sir. I would say the same would apply to forestry management as well. I will need to reframe my response to WDFW on this one. Thank you, Dave. up.gif BK

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PostMon Aug 28, 2023 9:08 am 
Dave Workman wrote:
Voter initiative is a LOUSY way to manage wildlife. Period. End of story. You cannot manage by emotion. And that is precisely what voter initiatives on wildlife issues do.
The WORST way to manage wildlife, though, is with capitalism: that created a mass extinction. You can't manage wildlife by turning habitat into parking lots, killing trees, and dumping chemical sludge into our wild lands. But we're really committed.

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PostMon Aug 28, 2023 11:52 am 
Cyclopath wrote:
The WORST way to manage wildlife, though, is with capitalism: that created a mass extinction. You can't manage wildlife by turning habitat into parking lots, killing trees, and dumping chemical sludge into our wild lands. But we're really committed.
Oh, you're on to something! Being an official "old timer" nowadays, I can recall tramping some of the places now turned into big parking lots or "improved" campgrounds which were once places we set up hunting camps with the barest of essentials. Quartz Meadow is one such place over in Yakima County. Heartbreaker! I do disagree about "capitalism" being the cause however. It seems more an effort by forest managers (who don't seem to manage people well at all! wink.gif ) to accommodate growing crowds--largely transplants who came top the Northwest to 'discover' the outdoors and are now trampling same--at the expense of the natural environment they're all so interested in visiting, experiencing and "protecting." That's not "capitalism" because when you look at the expense involved, it's kind of a money-losing proposition. Happy to say I have rarely camped in a developed campground, and if so, it's been during the fall hunting seasons, when I've been happily able to avoid the crowds. IK haven't dumped sludge and I've been very careful not to start forest fires. I cut "down and dead" trees for firewood (thus reducing dangerous fuel in a forest fire scenario).

"The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted." - D.H. Lawrence
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PostMon Aug 28, 2023 7:38 pm 
What I am curious about is whether any of the forest land managers (private or otherwise) have actually quantified the net amount of damage done within a given time frame and offered some estimate of actual net loss. I realize that's kind of analogous to trying to inventory the clouds in the sky, but if they have an argument, they should have something to support it. That said, again, in respect to the "emotion" part - the post just above begs the question "What if Washington State voters got to vote on an initiative on campgrounds?" You have to wonder which way that would go, given the current zeitgeist amongst the "greenie" community. (Think Olympic Hot Springs Road, Dosewallips CG, July Creek CG, Kopachuck SP, etc.)

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PostTue Aug 29, 2023 9:25 am 
Dave Workman wrote:
Voter initiative is a LOUSY way to manage wildlife.
We've been managing wildlife "Dave's way" for a couple hundred years now, through the crosshairs. Lewis and Clark noted endless herds of bison and elk stretching over the horizon all across the west. By the time most families moved west during the westward migration, those herds had long since been crosshair managed into oblivion. Soon after, the top predators, grizzlies and wolves, were managed to extinction here. (Cougars would have been but they are hard to find in daylight.) The remaining herds are at less than one percent thanks to all that crosshair management. The national parks are like animal museums, yet still have nowhere near 10% of the original population density. Each new generation is born into an increasingly impoverished world, and so has lowered expectations.
Dave Workman wrote:
You cannot manage by emotion
Pretty ironic from the guy who has continually tried to instill fear of wildlife in the public: "Anyone questioning why people carry sidearms whenever they step off the pavement just “ain’t from around here,” or they have a serious misunderstanding of just how “wild” wildlife can be." -Dave Workman There was a time when many hunters supplemented their food supply with wild game, and some still take the meat home for use. But now almost all hunting is "sport" hunting, with - just like fishing - the return on the investment being generally negative. You can buy venison and elk cheaper than you can shoot it if all costs are included. For quite a while now, our wildlife management has been exclusively resource based, with the resources being maximized for sport hunters. There is nothing natural or even traditional about that, it clearly has not served us well, and I am sure we can do better going forward.

Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir

Kascadia, Cyclopath, dave allyn
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PostTue Sep 12, 2023 5:15 am 
Everyone has their opinion which doesn't make it wrong or right. Some states have done quite well managing by your so call "crosshair management"

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