Forum Index > Gear Talk > Recommendations for skis on forest roads and trails?
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CS
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CS
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 11:57 am 
Cyclopath wrote:
CS wrote:
What was the issue you had with them?
They're the sour spot? Heavy, slow, and imprecise. Probably some of that is the boots I use them with. When will you be in the Methow? Or do you live there? I'll be there in December to ski, will bring these if you like, you can spend a day on them if you can get boots that will fit you.
Sweet. I live in Seattle, but was thinking mid to late December I should be able to make it out -- post holiday obligations. If you happen to have the specs handy that would be great, else I can PM you later on in December. Thanks!
KascadeFlat wrote:
CS wrote:
Not sure yet, I was thinking I'd keep it light and see if I could get away with some soft rope like what's on this Light Weight Racing Pulk.
up.gif I will report back on what option I go with and how well the solid poles work for towing weight up/downhill.
That would be great. I'm unclear what wet snow will be like when pulling a sled, everything I've read is from people in areas that get very cold.

KascadeFlat
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Schroder
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 12:43 pm 
I strongly second the suggestion of renting gear first. Skis are pretty personal on what feels right for you & it's an expensive mistake if you pick the wrong ones.

CS, KascadeFlat
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Randito
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Randito
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 1:26 pm 
FWIW: I've had positive experiences using the "Paris Expedition Sled" for hauling supplies into ski-in camps. When the approach is steep enough that I'm using skins on my skis for grip, I've used an old pair of glue on skins attached to the bottom of the sled to provide some relief from constant downward / rearward pull. I did learn the hard way on one trip that hauling 100 lbs of food and gear can be problematic even when you are burly enough to do it -- the climbing wires on my skis collapsed under the load and the rest of the trip I had to climb for turns with my heels flat on the ski... But we did have fresh bacon and eggs for many breakfasts on that trip.

CS
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CS
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CS
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 2:10 pm 
Yeah adding skins to the sled seems like a good idea. I was still planning on going as light as possible after watching these guys show you how easy their sleds were then proceed stumble around like drunks. Forward to 2:49:

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KascadeFlat
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 4:52 pm 
Whoa that video is a trip. Any idea what they were doing? Dragging a sled over ground cover looks…enraging. Hunting maybe? Comments said they had two cases of Diet Coke in the sled. 😂

For a good time call: 1-800-SLD-ALDR.
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CS
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CS
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PostTue Nov 01, 2022 5:23 pm 
Yeah they were hunters, and said they were planning on dragging those things out to the mountains in the distance. Not my idea of fun. But I could imagine getting into a similar situation on snow too trying to get it over a log or something.

KascadeFlat
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thunderhead
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PostWed Nov 02, 2022 7:08 pm 
Only the steepest forest roads justify AT gear in my opinion... and even then generally only if they are icy or compact. Any sort of prolonged gentle stretch and im usually quite happy to have brought my nordic gear. I really hate the flat bits on AT gear.

rossb, Cyclopath, CS
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Malachai Constant
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PostWed Nov 02, 2022 11:04 pm 
AT skis are for skinning up hills and skiing down using parallel turns. For logging roads best is steel edged Nordic skis with NNN bindings or if old school 3 pins and leather boots. You can pick them up at qsome second hand ski places relatively cheaply.

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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Eric Hansen
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PostSat Nov 05, 2022 4:38 pm 
+1 on 3 pin leather boots and steel edge nordic backcountry skis. Relatively cheap, and many around second hand. And yes to Schroder's comment of renting gear first, find out what you like. If you are buying new gear it can be an expensive mistake if you don't know your way thru the gear puzzle maze before buying.

Off trail rambler
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hbb
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PostMon Nov 14, 2022 1:46 pm 
I'd avoid 75mm 3-pin boots/bindings unless you find some killer garage sale deal. You really limit your options going with such an outdated standard compared to NNN-BC or whatever. For new boots in 75mm 3-pin, you are basically limited to 2 or 3 models from Alpina, and those cheap looking Whitewoods boots Walmart sells online. I say this as someone with several pairs of 75mm 3-pin boots in my own gear closet. I rarely use those boots (and skis I mounted with 3-pin bindings) because I couldn't find a good fit with the limited choices available at the time I was putting together a 3-pin set up. Plus I find a 75mm 3-pin binding really annoying in a groomed track, and strongly dislike trudging around with that big goofy duckbill on my toes. In my view, the one and only benefit of a 75mm 3-pin binding on nordic skis is the ability to use a true telemark boot (like a Scarpa T4) if you want to have the illusion of control on steeper descents outside groomed terrain. But if that's your typical use case, you should be on AT gear anyway.

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Randito
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Randito
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PostMon Nov 14, 2022 3:50 pm 
For skiing logging roads in the Cascades, old skool Telemark gear from the 80s and 90s works just fine. There is a ton of it gathering dust in Seattle basements and garages. A WTB ad on Craigslist could work. Also check eBay. Plastic 75mm / 3pin boots have superior support and water proofness than 3Pin leathers or more modern NNN or NNN-BC setups. However touring efficiency is markedly less and they are very efficient at generating heel blisters.

CS
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Huron
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PostTue Nov 22, 2022 6:26 pm 
These Stubai Free Heels work great on a pair of metal edge fishscale skis for low angle stuff. Straps onto trail runners or light hikers just fine. Dug them out of a dusty box in the corner of Marmot Mountain maybe 12 years ago but you can probably find them on an auction site or even make your own from a worn set of crampons and some tire rubber.

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Eric Hansen
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Eric Hansen
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PostFri Dec 02, 2022 8:55 pm 
Old school leather 3 pin boots are competent all rounders for many backcountry trips. Reasonably comfortable to live in day after day, ditto comfortable to walk in for long approaches. Their warts are fixable, negotiable. Supergaiters keep them dry, or warmer if you want to add the insulation. Granite Gear Tele Cuffs (add on stiffeners) beef up low cut boots (like my fav Asolo Snowfields) for long descents. Those low cut Snowfields have taken me to some good times. Zion's high plateau, southern Utah's Navajo Mt., Nevada's Mount Moriah and a Memorial Day descent of Colorado's Mount Elbert (via mellow SE slope). And, many springtime tours on my "home turf", Lake Superior's south shore. Maybe I'm missing something by not going to AT. Maybe not. Several of the Navajo Mt. trips were with a Rainbow Bridge approach, 7 miles of hiking canyons to get to the snow. Not sure AT boots would handle that.

Off trail rambler
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