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Mike Collins
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Mike Collins
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PostFri Jul 15, 2022 7:27 am 
Cleaning out my filing cabinet recently brought a sixty year old telegram back to life. President Kennedy was visiting my boyhood city of Chicago. A telegram was sent to each school and read in the classrooms. At the end of the day I went down to the office and asked for the telegram. The office staff graciously allowed me as an eight year old student to take it home. It is sadly ironic that the Northwest Highway mentioned by Mayor Daley was renamed the Kennedy Expressway some eight months later after his death in November, 1963. I corresponded with the principal of the Norwood Park School who was delighted to accept this gift to the school. He said he would put it up in the office for all to see. After his assassination in Dallas it was wisely decided not to broadcast the route which future presidents would be taking prior to any visits. The telegram causes reflection when thinking that this was the fastest means of mass communication at one time.

Anne Elk
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zephyr
aka friendly hiker



Joined: 21 Jun 2009
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zephyr
aka friendly hiker
PostTue Jul 26, 2022 4:47 pm 
mike wrote:
Kim Brown wrote:
I have Ancient Places. Really nice essays; interesting stuff!
Ancient Places: How the Land Shapes the People, and the People Shape the Land by Jack Nisbet, Sasquatch Books, Seattle, 2015. I just finished reading these essays by Jack Nisbet. Here's the publisher's page--Sasquatch Books in Seattle. I enjoyed some of these more than others. My favorite essay was the account of the Willamette Meteorite which I hadn't known about before. Such an interesting saga from "discovery" by a farmer in West Linn, Oregon in 1902 to international interest as a the huge hunk of iron is contested over by the farmer and Oregon Iron & Steel Company who owned the land that the meteorite was found on. There's so much history caught up in this story with evidence of Native American usage prior to the find. He discusses the origins of the meteorite billions of years ago and it's coming to Earth hundreds of miles away in Canada. Then it gets captured by the Pleistocene ice sheets and subsequently rafts down the Columbia in an iceberg via the Lake Missoula floods until it hit the Willamette foothills and comes to rest. This one story is worth checking this book out. Available from the Seattle Public Library (and interlibrary loan). ~z

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Ski
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Joined: 27 May 2005
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Location: tacoma
Ski
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PostTue Oct 25, 2022 7:54 am 
"Rehabilitating River Valley Ecosystems: Examples of Public, Private, and First Nation Cooperation in Western Washington" - Tim Abbe *.pdf format academia.edu just downloaded it... looks like an interesting presentation showing "before and after" with photos.

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Chief Joseph
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Chief Joseph
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PostFri Nov 04, 2022 7:45 pm 
Finally reading the mountaineering classic, "Annapurna" by Maurice Herzog...I found it just a bit dry through the first half, but the last part is riveting, amazing they survived and were the first (known) to summit a 8k meter peak. Also checked out, The edge of never and Weird hikes from the library...going to try to read a lot this winter.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Bosterson
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PostFri Nov 04, 2022 10:33 pm 
Chief Joseph wrote:
"Annapurna" by Maurice Herzog
It is a classic for sure, though afterward you should read "True Summit" by David Roberts, which discusses how Herzog controlled the story to make it a heroic narrative about the glory of France. (As expedition leader, he had exclusive publication rights for 2 years after the expedition, if I recall.) And Roberts basically contends Herzog didn't totally know what he was doing and the Chamonix guides (Lachenal, Rebuffat, Terray) were who really got them to the top. The part about the injections they got in their legs and groins for the frostbite and gangrene afterwards, and how the doctor was snipping off their toes with shears - presumably today, with a more modern understanding of frostbite, a different treatment might have saved more of their toes. (It's also a good example of the negative circulatory effects of old leather boots and strap crampons, and what a wonder clip crampons are!) https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/True-Summit/David-Roberts/9781476737874 Everything by David Roberts is great. smile.gif

Go! Take a gun! And a dog! Without a leash! Chop down a tree! Start a fire! Piss wherever you want! Build a cairn! A HUGE ONE! BE A REBEL! YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE! (-bootpathguy)

Chief Joseph, graywolf
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neek
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neek
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PostFri Nov 11, 2022 7:27 am 
The Unseen Body: A Doctor's Journey Through the Hidden Wonders of Human Anatomy. I loved this book, although it didn't make me want to become a doctor! Jonathan Reisman has practiced around the world, and details some of his most interesting cases - some harrowing, some tragic, some hilarious. Kind of a memoir; more storytelling than technical, full of metaphor (perhaps too much) and philosophy. Chapter titles are simply "Heart", "Liver", "Urine", "Mucus", etc. A quick and straightforward read, but not for the squeamish.

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Jumble Jowls
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Jumble Jowls
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PostTue Nov 15, 2022 4:24 pm 
Homo Ecophagus: A Deep Diagnosis to Save the Earth (Routledge, 2022) https://phys.org/news/2022-11-doctor-humanity-devouring-planet.html

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Jumble Jowls
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PostFri Dec 16, 2022 7:45 pm 
I'm just now reading, for the first time, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold by John le Carre. I had heard of it for years, but am just now getting to it. Damn, it is good. Surprisingly good. They don't write books like that any more. About two thirds of the way through.

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Waterman
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PostSun Dec 18, 2022 5:35 pm 
Gunfight, Ryan Busse Insider account of working in the gun industry. A subject matter that's prone to inflamed passion. This is a sober account of what goes on behind the scenes, the stranglehold the NRA has over the producers of firearms, and the political power derived from a unrelenting focus on the toeing the line. A must read for understanding the grey areas around this subect which will make everyone uncomfortable.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,I took the one less traveled by. And that has made all the difference. Robert Frost
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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



Joined: 10 Dec 2007
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Location: Pittsburgh
GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostSat Dec 24, 2022 4:38 pm 
In some lost place, by Sandy Allan.
Quote:
In the summer of 2012, a team of six climbers set out to attempt the first ascent of one of the great unclimbed lines of the Himalaya - the giant Mazeno Ridge on Nanga Parbat, the world's ninth highest mountain. At ten kilometres in length, the Mazeno is the longest route to the summit of an 8,000-metre peak. Ten expeditions had tried and failed to climb this enormous ridge. Eleven days later two of the team, Sandy Allan and Rick Allen, both in their late fifties, reached the summit
What an amazing book! A real page turner. Id read an article about this climb when it happened, and had also been familiar with Sandy Allan from his climb of Muztagh Tower, as well as his association with Doug Scott, so was super interested in getting to read the book. It didnt disappoint. The most interesting thing was the clarity with which the 11-day traverse along the 7000m Mazeno Ridge is described, contrasted with the confusion of the 2-3days at 8000m for the summit bid and scary descent when both climbers were exhausted, dehydrated, and were finally feeling the effects of the altitude.

'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!" Photography: flickr.com/photos/shahiddurrani
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