Forum Index > Public Lands Stewardship > Hiking affects wildlife
 Reply to topic
Previous :: Next Topic
Author Message
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 6220 | TRs | Pics
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
Faster than light
PostThu Jan 19, 2023 11:16 am 
Washington State University and National Park Service researchers found that when human hikers were present, 16 out of 22 mammal species, including predators and prey alike, changed where and when they accessed areas. Some completely abandoned places they previously used, others used them less frequently, and some shifted to more nocturnal activities to avoid humans. ... While the influence of low-impact recreation is concerning, the researchers emphasized that more research is needed to determine if it has negative effects on the species' survival. "This study does not say that hiking is necessarily bad for wildlife, but it does have some impacts on spatiotemporal ecology, or how wildlife uses a landscape and when," said Alissa Anderson, a resent WSU master's graduate and first author on the study. "Maybe they are not on the trails as much, but they're using different places, and how much does that actually impact species' ability to survive and thrive in a place, or not? There are a lot of questions about how this actually plays into population survival." https://phys.org/news/2023-01-low-impact-human-recreation-wildlife-behavior.amp

gb
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Anne Elk
BrontosaurusTheorist



Joined: 07 Sep 2018
Posts: 2022 | TRs | Pics
Location: Seattle
Anne Elk
BrontosaurusTheorist
PostThu Jan 19, 2023 10:25 pm 
This just seems like common sense. The huge growth in the use of the outdoors in the last 3 decades by all manner of enthusiast must be having a huge impact. That's one reason I'm not keen on griz reintroduction to the North Cascades. As a counterpoint, remember how animals began to fearlessly move into urban areas during the height of the pandemic? Photo essay ... Animals take to the streets amid lockdown

"There are yahoos out there. Itís why we canít have nice things." - Tom Mahood
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Sculpin
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Apr 2015
Posts: 1216 | TRs | Pics
Sculpin
Member
PostSat Jan 21, 2023 4:22 pm 
Based upon my best seat-of-the-pants assessment, the effect seems to be far less pronounced in National Parks. So maybe not just hiking? Maybe hiking combined with another human activity? wink.gif

Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir

thunderhead
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
coldrain108
Thundering Herd



Joined: 05 Aug 2010
Posts: 1838 | TRs | Pics
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
coldrain108
Thundering Herd
PostSat Jan 21, 2023 6:43 pm 
Sculpin wrote:
Based upon my best seat-of-the-pants assessment, the effect seems to be far less pronounced in National Parks. So maybe not just hiking? Maybe hiking combined with another human activity? wink.gif
🐕🦮🐩🐕‍🦺🐶 Why I like spending my hiking time in the National Parks.

Since I have no expectations of forgiveness, I don't do it in the first place. That loop hole needs to be closed to everyone.
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
thunderhead
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 1355 | TRs | Pics
thunderhead
Member
PostWed Jan 25, 2023 9:11 am 
Ya, long time national parks... going back probably 25 bear and deer generations, seem to have much less skittish populations from what I have seen. Id guess thats mostly the result of no hunting, but suppose no dogs also matters. Maybe a bit of the legacy of humans feeding em too. Super overcrowded spots like Yosemite and Zion valleys have a ton of relaxed animals, so id say it has very little to do with just humans.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Sculpin
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Apr 2015
Posts: 1216 | TRs | Pics
Sculpin
Member
PostThu Jan 26, 2023 9:36 am 
Somebody wrote on a different thread that bear sows in Katmai (IIRC) had learned to stash their cubs under a boardwalk used by humans, since they were less likely to be attacked by adult males there. I feel like I have seen similar phenomena. Just yesterday my wife and I hiked to the top of an open hill in Napa Valley. After we sat down at the picnic table up there we were surrounded by a flock of colorful birds, mostly bluebirds but also goldfinches and Audubon's warblers. We sat very still, and they came up very close. Then all of a sudden there was a lot of chattering, and I looked up and saw a sharp-shinned hawk cruising in. When I looked back down the birds had somehow melted into the backdrop. I'm convinced that some animals have figured out that we are about as dangerous as deer. rolleyes.gif

Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
   All times are GMT - 8 Hours
 Reply to topic
Forum Index > Public Lands Stewardship > Hiking affects wildlife
  Happy Birthday LittleHikerMom, Overlander, dawgpack!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum