Forum Index > Public Lands Stewardship > Protect America's Rock Climbing Act Introduced in Congress
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Cyclopath
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Cyclopath
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PostWed Mar 08, 2023 5:17 pm 
dave allyn
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Huron
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PostWed Mar 08, 2023 6:37 pm 
Summary: the bill's sponsor wants to prohibit fixed anchors from being prohibited offering climber safety, local dependence on tourism and tradition as reasons.

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Snowshovel
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PostWed Mar 08, 2023 8:59 pm 
For example, the NPS, without clear cut legal authority, removed bolts on the rib west of the west ridge gully on Forbidden Peak

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Randito
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PostWed Mar 08, 2023 11:09 pm 
Snowshovel wrote:
For example, the NPS, without clear cut legal authority, removed bolts on the rib west of the west ridge gully on Forbidden Peak
Contributing to at least one fatality https://www.rockandice.com/climbing-accidents/nps-chops-bolts-man-dies-descending-forbidden-peak/

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Cyclopath
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PostThu Mar 09, 2023 2:04 pm 
Huron wrote:
Summary: the bill's sponsor wants to prohibit fixed anchors from being prohibited offering climber safety, local dependence on tourism and tradition as reasons.
Another important thing is it brings clarity and consistency to how climbing is managed, since it's left to local discretion. Having decisions (like whether rap bolts can remain) made in a more uniform manner helps everybody know what to expect.

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Snowshovel
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PostThu Mar 09, 2023 4:55 pm 
A bolt is a bolt, any likely canít differentiate how the bolt was placed except to prohibit rotohammers

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Randito
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PostFri Mar 10, 2023 12:42 am 
Snowshovel wrote:
A bolt is a bolt, any likely canít differentiate how the bolt was placed except to prohibit rotohammers
I think the issue is less about the bolt and the method of installation, but rather the effect a bolt's presence has on route popularity. The NPS removed two bolts from Forbidden , one that had been around for a while another placed very recently by a commercial guiding operation to improve their clients safety and overall experience. I think it was rash of the NPS to chop those bolts , but the recent bolt was also placed without review / permission from the NPS in support of a commercial operation on lands managed by the NPS. It would be a real shame if this proposed legislation resulted in some Maestri style bolt ladders adorning our national parks.

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Bosterson
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PostSun Mar 12, 2023 10:07 am 
Randito wrote:
It would be a real shame if this proposed legislation resulted in some Maestri style bolt ladders adorning our national parks.
There is zero reason to think this would happen. Bolt installations are already regulated in national parks (no power drills, for instance) and this bill would just keep that status quo while standardizing those expectations across other areas. The USFS and NPS seem to have lost their minds recently and feel the need to micromanage and also have some irrational vendetta against bolts. There is plenty of bad bolting in the world, plenty of cheap bolts used, but it's always been this way (anyone ever clipped an old SMC death hangar?), and frankly the climbing community has never had better resources to manage its own bolting than now - bolts are better and stronger than they've ever been, with more options for varieties of rock (eg glue-ins) and better longevity (stainless bolts won't leach rust onto the rock and won't need replacement for decades), and the ASCA does major rebolting efforts to standardize old routes and make them safe. (Anyone ever had to clip an SMC death hangar that's on an old 1/4Ē buttonhead?) Blockheads at the land management agencies worrying that having a rap anchor on a peak makes it less "wild" than if it's a bunch of tat wrapped around a dead tree reminds me of the original bolt wars from the late 70s and 80s that were all pomp and ideology. Safety is generally good, no one is going to put a "compressor route" up a peak in North Cascades, and global warming is such a massively larger threat to wilderness than bolts that the hand wringing at the NPS etc al is absurd. I have yet to see them propose banning cars...

Go! Take a gun! And a dog! Without a leash! Chop down a tree! Start a fire! Piss wherever you want! Build a cairn! A HUGE ONE! BE A REBEL! YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE! (-bootpathguy)

trestle, Cyclopath
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