Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Getting sheep into the Entiat
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Dick B
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Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 327 | TRs | Pics
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
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PostSat Mar 25, 2023 10:37 am 
Thanks for mentioning the East of The Divide book. I brought it up online and am in the process of going through it. Several things jump out at me so far. My granddad was the forest ranger at Lake Wenatchee, for a time, when A.H. Sylvester was the forest supervisor. This was back in the 19 teens. I once had a Wenatchee Daily World article about my granddad and what it was like to be a district ranger at that time. As I recall it was mostly trail construction / maintenance, fire protection, packing fish into the high lakes and probably watching over the grazing. I remember a picture of all the rangers and the supervisor that were on the forest at the time. I think my folks knew Dale Allen. At least I heard his name mentioned lots of times. He may have been a game protector then. Miss Wheeler may have gotten her pack horse from my dad. He had a horse ranch at the forks of the White River and the North Fork (now the Napeequa). He packed for the Forest Service but lost the ranch during the depression. One of the posts mentioned sheep being brought up Lake Chelan and dropped of along the south shore. I have a friend that spent 4 years as a kid living in Holden. His dad was the mine engineer. I asked him if sheep ever came up that way, perhaps heading for the meadows above Lyman Lake. He said he never saw any. The cabin at Lyman Lake was described in the book. It has also been mentioned in several posts on this forum. The cabin was built in the early 1900s, abandoned in the late 70s and burned in 1980. The pictures of the Lyman Glacier taken in 1928 vs. 2001 show the remarkable decline in its size. It is said that the glacier reached its maximum size during the little ice age which ended in the mid 1800s. As I remember from my visit in the '60s, the terminal moraine was probably a half mile below the toe of the glacier at that time. It was clear that the glacier had been retreating for quite some time. I found the sheep trails chapter very interesting. Just getting the sheep in and out of the high country had to have been quite a task. Then just moving them from site to site during the grazing season. Quite a history there.

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Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Getting sheep into the Entiat
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