Forum Index > Photography Talk > Rolling shutter why?
 Reply to topic
Previous :: Next Topic
Author Message
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 7637 | TRs | Pics
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
Faster than light
PostTue Jun 13, 2023 5:02 pm 
Is anybody in here about to describe how this benefits photography?

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
domaz
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Jun 2006
Posts: 125 | TRs | Pics
Location: Tacoma
domaz
Member
PostWed Jun 14, 2023 10:22 am 
Historically unless you were using a leaf shutter all shutters were like this. Think the early Leica and Graflex focal plane shutters. They were just a slit in a piece of fabric that moved across the film plane. This meant that when shooting motion the motion blur had a unique look that you wouldn't get with a leaf shutter. Here's a modern example of someone using a focal plane shutter for some neat effects (i.e. the classic race car motion blur). Having a setting like this on a digital camera just lets you emulate that effect if you want to.

Cyclopath
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
huron
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Sep 2004
Posts: 1020 | TRs | Pics
huron
Member
PostWed Jun 14, 2023 3:05 pm 
Here is the classic example. Shutter slit moves top to bottom. Camera is panning to right making people slant left. Car is moving faster than the pan causing the wheels to elongate right. You might be thinking it should go the other way, but remember the image from the lens is upside-down on the film plane.

Cyclopath
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 7637 | TRs | Pics
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
Faster than light
PostFri Jun 16, 2023 8:26 pm 
Thanks, both of you, this is really interesting. smile.gif I learned about this kind of shutter while reading about how the S23 Ultra and iPhone 14 Max can be used to steal cryptographic keys from smart cards because of this shutter. The light sensing hardware might be able to do 60 frames per second but the behavior of the shutter allows 60,000 samples. The LED light on the card reader gets brighter when the device uses more power. Recording the fluctuating power usage reveals what mathematical operations the CPU was doing to validate keys. It's insane that this is even remotely possible. Made me curious what the legitimate use is for good technology, it's very cool, and so opposite to what I was reading about!

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
contour5
Member
Member


Joined: 16 Jul 2003
Posts: 2960 | TRs | Pics
contour5
Member
PostFri Jun 16, 2023 8:55 pm 
Cyclopath wrote:
Recording the fluctuating power usage reveals what mathematical operations the CPU was doing to validate keys. It's insane that this is even remotely possible.
Also slightly terrifying

Cyclopath
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
sunwildernesshike
Member
Member


Joined: 26 May 2023
Posts: 7 | TRs | Pics
sunwildernesshike
Member
PostWed Jun 28, 2023 8:58 am 
Rollin' shutter is pretty cool for photography. It captures sharp visual detail, gives you smooth motion blur, reduces blurring when you're shootin' fast moving objects, and helps you get clear shots even when you're movin' quickly. All that adds up to some really neat and creative shots for any photo sesh.

Cyclopath
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
   All times are GMT - 8 Hours
 Reply to topic
Forum Index > Photography Talk > Rolling shutter why?
  Happy Birthday moosefish!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum