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Songs2
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Songs2
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:35 am 
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox, then insert feet into wet boots. For feet of my size, the free bags various parks provide for dog poop are perfect. Carrying a small tube of antifungal cream and applying it after drying the feet at night could also help podiatric health.

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Schroder
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:37 am 
Songs2 wrote:
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox
The Stephenson solution - assuming you never sweat. I've tried this once and I'd never subject my feet to it again.

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Damian
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 10:53 am 
Schroder wrote:
Are you sure the water is coming in through your boots and not being wicked down from your clothing and socks?
100% sure. I've done the rain pants, gaiter, plastic bag stuff. If the water finds it's way to the leather it will find my feet though it may take hours of exposure. I'm talking hours if not days of exposure to wet bushes/brush. Gaiters typically leave some leather exposed. Water is sneaky stuff. Again, the only success I have had, and it has been 100%, are boots with rubber that comes up relatively high before meeting the leather. That along with gaiters or boots. Maybe this is the only solution for tough conditions.

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joker
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 11:16 am 
iron wrote:
quick drying tennis shoes.
This was more or less the approach the US Army took when designing the Vietnam era combat boot, which was had porous sides, leather treated more for preventing rot than water intrusion, and they also had two metal drain holes in the instep area. I.e. a boot that would dry quickly after getting wet versus the GTX boot approach, which yields a boot that pretty much NEVER dries out in the field once the water has intruded, which it always will in truly miserable conditions. But the Vietnam boot strategy may be good for hot jungles or warm trips in the desert Southwest or even up here in summer, but is not as fully awesome in hypothermia weather. The only boots I've every used that truly keep water out have rubber going a fair ways up - i.e. LL Bean "Main Hunting Shoes" (i.e. "Bean boots") or Sorells. But these aren't great *hiking* boots and that same waterproofness guarantees that all my foot sweat will stay inside the boot when exerting (yes, vapor barrier socks can help here, particularly in colder weather but are still not a perfect solution for all wet conditions and situations).

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Randito
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 12:09 pm 
Schroder wrote:
Songs2 wrote:
For keeping feet dry, my simple solution is to don plastic bags over dry wool sox
The Stephenson solution - assuming you never sweat. I've tried this once and I'd never subject my feet to it again.
The vapor barrier approach works better when an additional barrier is worn next to skin and antiperspirant spray is applied to the feet every few days. On multi-day snow camping trips with plastic boots and thermofit liners -- this approach is useful since those boots and liners are vapor barriers already and drying socks overnight while snow camping isn't particularly effective.

rossb
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joker
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PostThu Sep 26, 2019 11:32 pm 
Yeah, what I've done for cold overnighters is a thin liner sock against skin, then the VBL, then the warmer insulating sock layer. In cold weather, the liner sock has never been more than damp, and my feet sweat like crazy in general. So I think Stephenson's notions about vapor pressure etc have some validity (I.e. that once a certain vapor pressure is reached, the sweat rate slows or stops). And unlike thick wool socks, a thin synthetic liner sock dries relatively quickly - such as in an inside torso pocket under some warm layers while hanging out and having dinner.

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Cyclopath
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Cyclopath
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PostSat Sep 28, 2019 7:42 am 
I've been a wool guy for more than a decade, but this summer I tried coolmax socks and turned been working well for me. I'm sure they aren't a 100% solution or even close, but a step in the right direction is better than not.

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HikerJohn
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PostSun Oct 06, 2019 6:01 pm 
I'm with you: I'm tired of the Goretex "waterproof" adverts and spending a lot of money on boots that shortly after you buy them, will leave you with wet feet. It's not wicking down my socks, or running down my legs-- I can feel it creeping in from the seams. Most recent attempt was a set of pretty Mammut Ayako boots that have hiked well for a year, but recently are leaking like a sieve. Thinking about going back to all-leather uppers and SnoSeal.. Any recommendations??

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Ski
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PostMon Oct 07, 2019 9:26 am 
Chief Joseph wrote:
All leather boots treated with Obenaufs and wear Gaiters.
^ this. up.gif

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."

rossb
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Chief Joseph
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PostFri Sep 01, 2023 11:05 pm 
Many times I wear trail runners, and many of them have a mesh foot box. It is annoying when on a dusty trail the dust goes through the mesh and onto my socks. Also a bit of wet vegetation will get your foot wet in the toe box. I know a couple advantages to TRunners is that they vent well and also dry quickly, but I was wondering if anyone has tried waterproofing just the toe box and if so how did it work out? As to the original question, I used to do a lot of trail riding on my motorcycle and my feet would typically get wet. My solution was some thick wool foot pads (maybe even doubled up if boots large enough) and thick wool socks. I found that I could get quite a lot of water in my boots and wool pads would soak it up and my feet would remain dry and warm.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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RumiDude
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PostSat Sep 02, 2023 7:35 am 
I have found that there is no magic bullet of any one or two pieces of gear that matche all the various scenarios that one encounters out in the backcountry. The best solution is to get something that matches YOU and YOUR preferences for comfort and performance and just accept the other circumstances when they are less than optimal. Either that or prop your feet up on the couch and stay home. Rumi

"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."

rossb
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Chief Joseph
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Chief Joseph
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PostSun Sep 03, 2023 2:34 pm 
I sprayed them twice with camp dry, might keep some of the dust out.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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RumiDude
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RumiDude
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PostMon Sep 04, 2023 8:20 am 
Wear your Wellies. Rumi

"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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electrichiking
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electrichiking
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PostFri Sep 22, 2023 11:41 am 
Hello everyone. I plan to go hiking in wet/slightly snowy conditions in the wasatch/Uinta range in mid October. I expect the temperature to be 25 at night to below 40 in the day. I plan on walking through rivers and maybe even walk through fresh snow. At these temperatures I am planning on wearing a thin silk liner sock or a thin merino wool liner sock, with sealskinz waterproof socks over the liner socks. And then on top of the waterproof socks my shoes are NON-waterproof trail runners that can dry quickly. I also have pretty long GORE-TEX gaiters from OR to prevent water from coming in from the top and entering my waterproof socks from the top. I understand that my feet will take a long time to dry once wet, but is this strategy a good one? If you do not recommend sealskinz waterproof socks, I don't mind wearing a plastic bag over the thin liner sock. What do you guys think is the best strategy for this temperature range? Any recommendations are helpful!

-Happy hikes!
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