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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



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GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostMon Oct 02, 2023 6:46 am 
Right from the very beginnings of taking up photography as a hobby, I'd wanted an SLR camera. My first camera, which I got on my 15th birthday, had been a fully manual Yashica SLR; the next a fully manual Nikon SLR, after which I switched to DSLRs. The "what-you-see-is-what-you-get" aspect had been extremely appealing to me, as well as just the satisfying sound the mirror/shutter made as the exposure was taken. Anyway, I was recently forced to get a new camera, and made the difficult decision to switch to a mirrorless system. Wave of the future and all that. This Saturday, for my first fall trip of the year, I visited Dolly Sods, a 4000ft high plateau in West Virginia, for sunrise (followed by a hike in its sister 4000ft plateau, Roaring Plains). I picked Dolly Sods because I'd visited it last year around the same time, which would make for a fair comparison of my new camera system (mirrorless) with the old one (DSLR). Here are my early impressions: Overall, I think the new system did well and was at least equal to the old one, if not a tiny bit better. Pros and cons... Pro: I can now select any place on the field of view to focus on, since the auto focus works off the sensor and is not based on the optics. In the old system, the focus points would often not fall where I wanted to focus, so I would have to either focus manually, or use the autofocus, then switch to manual focus (to turn the autofocus off) and recompose. Big plus! As far as I can tell, manual focus is now only needed if you want to selectively focus on a subject, primarily when using a telephoto lens, and there's something else in the way that's grabbing focus. I doubt I will ever have to use it for landscape photography. Pro: I can review the photo in the camera viewfinder, including its histogram, and not have to solely rely on the image on the back LCD screen. This is quite useful, because the latter often suffers from glare. Pro: The image quality of the new camera/lens is at least as good as previously. This was the part I was most worried about. If the new camera/lens was even a bit worse, it would have been a disaster, for me. So, even though it's basically a wash, I'd deem it a big plus! Con: This new camera chews through batteries like the Cookie Monster scarfing down cookies. I will have to carry a spare battery at all times on even the shortest trips. Time will tell if I get used to this. At the moment: big minus. Con: I can't see through the camera/lens until I turn the camera on, which I was reluctant to do, given the battery situation. Con: I was expecting to be able to use my old remote shutter releases - both the wired and wireless - but had to get new ones, because the jack is different. That was annoying. (Thankfully, the batteries were the same.) A wash: While my mirrorless camera (Canon R6) is lighter and less bulky compared to the DSLR (Canon 5D Mark III), the wide-angle lens I'm using now (RF14-35mm F4 L) is image stabilized, which makes it heavier than the old one (EF17-40mm f/4 L). The end result is something that is about equal in weight (the mirrorless system is maybe a bit lighter). A couple of sample shots:
DSLR (2022)
DSLR (2022)
Mirrorless (2023)
Mirrorless (2023)

'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!" Photography: flickr.com/photos/shahiddurrani

jaysway, Josh Journey, day_hike_mike, neek, JimK
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Gil
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Gil
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PostTue Oct 03, 2023 9:48 pm 
I think I probably have the cameras now that I will use until I can't see anymore! But in looking at mirrorless, battery life has been a big concern. Right now, the equivalent mirrorless Nikon to my D780 would require at least five batteries to equal the life that the D780 gets. That negates the weight and volume savings of the mirrorless body. Add in all the native Nikon glass that I have for my DSLRs, and I can't see myself switching (unless some thief cleans me out). But your results look pretty darn good, and the usability factors that you mention are persuasive.

Friends help the miles go easier. Klahini
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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



Joined: 10 Dec 2007
Posts: 4906 | TRs | Pics
Location: Pittsburgh
GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostWed Oct 04, 2023 5:00 am 
I was in no hurry to make the switch myself. The early timing was forced upon me when I lost my camera and my go-to (wide angle) lens. The lenses, as you point out, were a consideration. I had four high quality Canon L lenses with EF mounts (of which I lost one). These don't really have 1-1 variants with the native-to-mirrorless RF mounts, so replacing them (however one went about doing that) was not an option. Thankfully Canon provides a connector that allows mounting my old EF Canon lenses onto the new RF mount. This connector is essentially air, along with some wiring to continue to allow the camera to talk with the lens (for autofocus/aperture control), so leads to no loss in quality. Unfortunately, the connector ended up being a bit bulkier than I was expecting, which cuts into the space/weight savings. I'm committed now, though.

'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!" Photography: flickr.com/photos/shahiddurrani
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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



Joined: 10 Dec 2007
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Location: Pittsburgh
GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostMon Oct 16, 2023 3:29 pm 
GaliWalker wrote:
The image quality of the new camera/lens is at least as good as previously. This was the part I was most worried about.
I can now say that the image quality of the new camera + (wide-angle) lens is emphatically better than my previous camera with its older generation sensor. The end-end sharpness of the lens, even at f/22, is pretty impressive, and the much cleaner, less noisy images are obvious (at the pixel-peeper level).
One other thing that wasn't too obvious to me originally is that every shot with the new camera is like a mirror-lockup shot - there's no mirror to lock up - which means that there's an even better chance of getting sharper photos. I still have to try the camera for wildlife photography, but that probably won't happen for a while; my hiking season is in full swing right now.

'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!" Photography: flickr.com/photos/shahiddurrani

awilsondc
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Sore Feet
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Sore Feet
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PostMon Oct 16, 2023 8:59 pm 
Gil wrote:
I think I probably have the cameras now that I will use until I can't see anymore! But in looking at mirrorless, battery life has been a big concern. Right now, the equivalent mirrorless Nikon to my D780 would require at least five batteries to equal the life that the D780 gets. That negates the weight and volume savings of the mirrorless body. Add in all the native Nikon glass that I have for my DSLRs, and I can't see myself switching (unless some thief cleans me out).
I went from a D600 to a z6, and I was definitely concerned about the hit in battery life that I'd see, but 3 years later and it really hasn't ever been a problem for me in the slightest. I was always using live view on the DSLR anyway, so the battery life really isn't much different - if you never used live view then you might notice a difference, but for me at least it's been pretty much a wash. The reported battery life for all these mirrorless cameras is far, far below what it ends up being in actual practice.

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