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Eric Hansen
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Eric Hansen
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PostFri Dec 29, 2023 7:43 pm 
My twin Morton's toe (have on both feet) are migrating into Hammertoe. Morton's toe is when the second toe is as long or longer than the big toe. Hammertoe is when a toe develops an inverted V shape, a ^ shape flexing at the knuckle. Anyone have any experience addressing Hammertoe?

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Anne Elk
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PostSat Dec 30, 2023 3:55 am 
Eric, It's a complex problem that IMO is best addressed thru consultation and work with the professionals. I'd recommend a podiatrist consult to assess what stage it's at to see if low-tech solutions can help. But in my experience as an LMT who's taken classes with some excellent PTs who have skills in some form of structural integration, a more elegant solution would be to also address the resultant patterns and compensations in the fascia of the legs and the whole foot. That kind of hands-on work will make you feel completely different and help accelerate any approach the MDs would suggest, including conventional PT-related exercise. There are some reference links in the Wiki articles on Morton's as well as hammertoe which might be worth looking at. If you have extremely high arches (as in the one Wiki photo) that may add an additional complication. I'm happy to talk further via PM about how to search for a good hands-on therapist where you live.

"There are yahoos out there. Itís why we canít have nice things." - Tom Mahood

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DadFly
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PostSat Dec 30, 2023 9:09 am 
I have this and went to a few podiatrists over the years. It finally got so bad I could barely wear shoes. I was literally told that amputation was a common remedy. A friend talked me into going to a Shiatsu massage therapist. I decided "What the hell. Cut it off at big expense or try an $80 massage?" It was not a relaxing massage. It was hard at first but got better and better over the hour. I literally walked out of the Shiatsu massage with ZERO pain.

"May you live in interesting times"

Anne Elk, half fast
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Eric Hansen
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Eric Hansen
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PostSat Dec 30, 2023 9:13 pm 
Anne Elk, thanks for the good nudge and insight. DadFly, thanks for sharing your story. Fortunately I am not in pain with this (yet) but visually I'm seeing things that concern me. The massage angle is intriguing.

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Anne Elk
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Bowregard
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PostSun Dec 31, 2023 8:56 am 
My wife and I have both had this condition (along with other foot issues) and had different doctors with different approaches. Me: I went to a podiatrist who tried injections and PT and eventually I had surgery that included the following: 1. Remove arthritis from 2nd & 3rd toes. 2. Remove neuroma between 2nd & 3rd toes. 3. Remove joints and fuse toes. 4. Cut calf muscle (partially) to extend. I guess this is a standard surgery targeted to remove all the issues (even if some are uncertain). The doctor convinced me that after this long the issue would not heal on it's own. Surprisingly, the part that was most effective was the calf extension that scared me the most. Removing the neuroma resulted in phantom pain (and I don't think I had a neuroma problem to begin with). Fusing the toes was only partially successful (they are slightly bent all the time now). In hindsight, I think most parts of the surgery were unnecessary and I would have been better off without them. Wife: My wife went to a Orthopedic surgeon who took care of her Hammer Toe by snipping a ligament or tendon that pulled the toe down (office procedure) This was quite successful to resolve her issue. She also had arthritis in her big toe and the surgeon replaced the joint with an artificial joint. So far (5 years or so) that has served her well. My advice? Stay conservative and see an orthopedic foot specialist before committing to any surgery. The massage option sounds worth a try and if that and doesn't do the trick ask about procedures to free the hammer toe that don't fuse the toes. Good luck to you.

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DadFly
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PostSun Dec 31, 2023 1:37 pm 
The tendons are what a good Shiatsu master can fix. Loosen them up using key pressure points then open up circulation using other pressure points. Fast, effective and way cheaper than surgery. Not to mention recovery time is zero.

"May you live in interesting times"

Anne Elk
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RumiDude
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PostSun Dec 31, 2023 3:22 pm 
I have not had either Morton's toe or hammer toes but my son did have hammer toes and the surgical procedures have not solved the issue and in some ways made it worse. In light of that and my own personal history with surgery, I always advise looking for non-surgical alternatives for almost any issue because surgery cannot be undone. Once you start down that road it often can mean more surgeries to either fine tune things or fix problems caused by earlier surgeries. This seems to particularly apply to muscular/skeletal surgeries. Of course there are always notable exceptions to this where surgery is absolutely required, like compound fractures and similar. So yea, I know it is often frustrating to consider alternatives to surgery, but I have found that as often as not it is the better path. It is tempting to take the quick fix, scheduled surgery plus recovery time, rather than try non-invasive strategies. Try the non-invasive first, then move on to more invasive solutions. Anyway, don't know if any of this applies to your situation but I throw it out there for consideration. Rumi

"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."

reststep
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Bootpathguy
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PostSun Dec 31, 2023 11:38 pm 
RumiDude wrote:
: I have not had either Morton's toe
And you won't. You're born with it

Experience is what'cha get, when you get what'cha don't want
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RumiDude
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PostTue Jan 02, 2024 2:32 pm 
Bootpathguy wrote:
RumiDude wrote:
: I have not had either Morton's toe
And you won't. You're born with it
Well duh! The thrust of my post is to always deeply consider the least invasive procedure first. If that doesn't work then move to more invasive procedures. Surgery cannot be undone and can sometimes lead to further surgeries. I would strongly suggest something like DadFly proposed or similar. It often requires more patience but it is generally much better in the long run. Rumi

"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."

reststep
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Eric Hansen
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Eric Hansen
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PostWed Jan 17, 2024 8:34 pm 
Thank you, one and all, for your responses. When I posted this my thought was that people on this board have seen a lot of foot issues and remedies. I've had a PT for some time that I've been pretty impressed with. Got in to see her last week and she noticed that when I'm walking (barefoot) I was favoring the outside toes, less engagement with the larger two. So she has me on a regimen of focusing on balanced toe engagement while walking, calf stretches and raises and rolling massage underfoot. I suspect we'll expand on that at my second appointment. The massage idea interests me. Surgery? I'm a skeptic and my hammertoe issues are not that acute. I'm thinking a bunch of mindfulness makes sense.

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DadFly
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PostThu Jan 18, 2024 10:05 am 
Get you one of these. Use it on your feet and up your calves and thighs. If it isn't bone and it hurts, you found the right spots.

"May you live in interesting times"
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Anne Elk
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Anne Elk
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PostThu Jan 18, 2024 4:20 pm 
^^^ That tool might be ok for sore muscle symptomatic relief but would do nothing for whatís going on here, which is a structural problem w/various compensations. Manual therapy might help, conventional ďmassageĒ, not at all. Just sayiní.

"There are yahoos out there. Itís why we canít have nice things." - Tom Mahood
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DadFly
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PostThu Jan 18, 2024 6:24 pm 
Compensations. Yes. But pain on. Donít let me stop you. 😆

"May you live in interesting times"
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