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joeman3285
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joeman3285
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PostTue Jun 16, 2009 2:13 pm 
Does any one partake of wild edible plants while on the trail? Its something I've been looking into trying this summer (as long as I can ID them correctly of course...). Any field guides people would recommend pertaining to this subject? Thanks! -joe

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ASBrauer
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PostTue Jun 16, 2009 3:29 pm 
Huckleberries (blue, red or purple), Salmonberries, Thimbleberries (my personal fave), wild blackberries (so much better than the Euro-invasion variety), wild onions....all super tasty. There's also Oregon Grape (berries or very very young greens to chew) Salal berries....umm there are more I can't think of.

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sarbar
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PostTue Jun 16, 2009 6:07 pm 
These are the pages I have written about what I will eat. But be careful, always know what you are eating. Read up, study a lot. Hike with someone who knows their stuff first if you can smile.gif Salmonberries are ripening up right around 1000 feet elevation. Tasty!

https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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Malachai Constant
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PostTue Jun 16, 2009 6:22 pm 
Quite a few alpine plants are quite deadly especially Hellebourne, Monkshood, and Water Hemlock among the worst. Lupines cause miscarriages as to many pulses. Some plants contain cyanide. Be very sure you are right. The huckleberries are safe but we once saw nightshade growing near.

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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Hulksmash
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 10:41 am 
Quote:
Huckleberries (blue, red or purple), Salmonberries, Thimbleberries (my personal fave), wild blackberries (so much better than the Euro-invasion variety), wild onions....all super tasty. There's also Oregon Grape (berries or very very young greens to chew) Salal berries....umm there are more I can't think of.
Oregon Grape?! paranoid.gif paranoid.gif I was not aware those were edible. I believe i read some where....a long, long, long, time ago they were not.

"Bears couldn't care less about us....we smell bad and don't taste too good. Bugs on the other hand see us as vending machines." - WetDog Albuterol! it's the 11th essential
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sarbar
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sarbar
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 10:51 am 
Hulksmash wrote:
Quote:
Huckleberries (blue, red or purple), Salmonberries, Thimbleberries (my personal fave), wild blackberries (so much better than the Euro-invasion variety), wild onions....all super tasty. There's also Oregon Grape (berries or very very young greens to chew) Salal berries....umm there are more I can't think of.
Oregon Grape?! paranoid.gif paranoid.gif I was not aware those were edible. I believe i read some where....a long, long, long, time ago they were not.
They are ... technically... but lets face it, they don't taste great. As always on those types, kids and women of child bearing age should NOT eat them. Eat too many and your stomach will tell you knock it off ;-)

https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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ASBrauer
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 10:56 am 
sarbar wrote:
Hulksmash wrote:
Oregon Grape?! paranoid.gif paranoid.gif I was not aware those were edible. I believe i read some where....a long, long, long, time ago they were not.
They are ... technically... but lets face it, they don't taste great. As always on those types, kids and women of child bearing age should NOT eat them. Eat too many and your stomach will tell you knock it off ;-)
I never said they were delicious. I just recall daring each other to pop one or two as kids. Sour to the point of being very bitter as I recall. The fresh green leaves are tasty to chew though. I'm mean REALLY new growth while they're still very light green and very soft.

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The Angry Hiker
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 12:00 pm 
Grampa and I used to eat wild Choke Berries all the time when I was a kid, though I see on sarbar's page that they are deadly poisonous. Go figure. There are also a couple other plants I occasionally partake in but I don't know their official names. Gramps called them "Sourbone" (probably Sheep Sorrel) and "Jigger Nuts". Did I mention that Grampa was a drinker?

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Meander
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Meander
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 4:32 pm 
I've read that Chocolate Lilies are edible. They sound good!
Quote:
Like many of the lillies, the bulbs of the Chocolate Lily were eaten by Native Americans.

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Malachai Constant
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Malachai Constant
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PostWed Jun 17, 2009 5:31 pm 
Just don't get any crocus or death camus eek.gif

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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ronski
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ronski
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 3:24 pm 
ASBrauer wrote:
sarbar wrote:
Hulksmash wrote:
Oregon Grape?! paranoid.gif paranoid.gif I was not aware those were edible. I believe i read some where....a long, long, long, time ago they were not.
They are ... technically... but lets face it, they don't taste great. As always on those types, kids and women of child bearing age should NOT eat them. Eat too many and your stomach will tell you knock it off ;-)
I never said they were delicious. I just recall daring each other to pop one or two as kids. Sour to the point of being very bitter as I recall. The fresh green leaves are tasty to chew though. I'm mean REALLY new growth while they're still very light green and very soft.
The Oregon Grape berries ARE very very sour, but edible. And you can indeed use them to make jelly (done that) with lots of sugar. And it tastes just like... grape jelly! Other wild plants that come to mind: stinging nettles (harvest with gloves, boil 'em as greens). If you're at lower elevations with wet areas, the cattails should be coming on right about now-- just pull the shoots, peel a bit and eat the whitish parts at the bottom raw. Quite good. And at the higher elevations there's always lots of sheep sorrell right on the trails, especially dryer areas. Can't miss it if you know what it looks like: http://www.dgsgardening.btinternet.co.uk/sorrel_sheep02.jpg Just pick a few of the leaves and chew on 'em. They taste quite tart, because they have lots of vitamin C.

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Wolfeye
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 4:03 pm 
What scares me is when I find discarded skunk cabbage seed pods that hikers have nibbled like corncobs. Skunk cabbage is toxic to humans! I'd sooner eat a waxy storebought apple. My tribe used to use skunk cabbage leaves for cooking purposes, but then the high temperatures neutralize the poison. Otherwise, they're not a smart trail nibble.

"Come let us climb a mountain, holding on by low scragged limbs." - Roger Zelanzany
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Schroder
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 4:57 pm 
Oregon Grape makes great wine too biggrin.gif

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sarbar
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sarbar
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 6:10 pm 
Schroder wrote:
Oregon Grape makes great wine too biggrin.gif
So do Dandelions biggrin.gif Yum!

https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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moosefish
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moosefish
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 6:57 pm 
What about Miner's Lettuce? Is it aptly named?

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