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Malachai Constant
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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 9:05 pm 
Minors lettuce is ok kind of bland but nothing toxic looks much like it. Avoid parsley looking things especially with lots of small white compound flowers (carrot family) that is where Hemlock resides and some not quite as deadly but still toxic plants eek.gif

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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Mike E.
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PostSun Jun 21, 2009 9:49 pm 
If you really want to be able to eat in the wild you should see what the native people were eating. Search on "ethnobotany" and you'll get a long list of things to check into. If you're over on the East side you could sample elderberry, service berry, and wild rose hips,(just the outer part as the seeds are really nasty). Juniper berries are o.k. when they're ripe and the very fresh, bright green tips of fir, spruce and pine are pretty good, (make sure they're very young and tender). Fireweed shoots are good when cooked. The premier wild food in my opinion has got to be the various mushrooms. It takes some study to make sure that you're getting the right ones and you sure don't want to be eating the wrong ones, but they are so good that it's well worth figuring out which are edible.

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joeman3285
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PostWed Jun 24, 2009 9:37 pm 
Awesome, Thanks for the info everyone!

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pimaCanyon
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PostThu Jul 30, 2009 5:35 pm 
leaves from Avalanche and Glacier Lilies are edible. My favorite tasting green snack while on the trail are leaves from Jeffrey Shooting Star.

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Hooberhobber
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PostWed Sep 09, 2009 3:50 pm 
The Angry Hiker wrote:
Grampa and I used to eat wild Choke Berries all the time when I was a kid, though I see on sarbar's page that they are deadly poisonous. Go figure. There are also a couple other plants I occasionally partake in but I don't know their official names. Gramps called them "Sourbone" (probably Sheep Sorrel) and "Jigger Nuts". Did I mention that Grampa was a drinker?
Hmm... Wonder why would anyone ever want to eat something named "Choke Berries"? The name would have made me pass on those. Upchuck berries anyone? lol.gif

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sarbar
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PostWed Sep 09, 2009 4:42 pm 
Hooberhobber wrote:
The Angry Hiker wrote:
Grampa and I used to eat wild Choke Berries all the time when I was a kid, though I see on sarbar's page that they are deadly poisonous. Go figure. There are also a couple other plants I occasionally partake in but I don't know their official names. Gramps called them "Sourbone" (probably Sheep Sorrel) and "Jigger Nuts". Did I mention that Grampa was a drinker?
Hmm... Wonder why would anyone ever want to eat something named "Choke Berries"? The name would have made me pass on those. Upchuck berries anyone? lol.gif
With most berries a few here and there won't kill you - but eating a bushel of bad berries is going to be bad. Small children, elderly, sick and pregnant is your more likely to be harmed section as well. The good thing is that most bad berries taste nasty so you don't eat them! (Unlike fungi......)

https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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PostWed Sep 09, 2009 5:26 pm 
Blackberries ( wild, Himalaya, Cut-Leaf ); huckleberries ( red or blue ); Salmonberries; Thimbleberries; Salal berries - all good right off the vine ( or bush. ) Oregon Grape; Elderberry: great jelly, lousy off the bush. As previously stated: if they make you gag, they probably aren't good to eat. Wood Sorrel: ( looking at photos on the web, I'm referring to "Common Wood Sorrel, unless I'm mistaken ) great stuff, but according to the material posted on some websites, not good in great quantity. I'll shove a few of them in my mouth on a trail now and then to keep my mouth wet- they're so sour they make you salivate. Stinging nettle: not too bad cooked. Kind of like spinach. More hassle than it was worth. I'd rather have the spinach. Bracken Fern: young fiddleheads are pretty tasty steamed. Some claim they're poisonous. ( Native Americans at Ozette harvested the root of the plant as a food source. ) Field Guide: I have a little pocket-size "Pacific Coast Berry Finder" by Glen Keator, PhD 1978 Nature Study Guild. Available at Kalaloch R.S., among other places.

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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TrailPair
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PostFri Sep 25, 2009 2:21 pm 
A warning about elderberries. They can have an adverse effect on some folks....but not affect others at all. A couple years ago, We picked a bunch of them and took them home to make smoothies. The smoothies were quirte tasty....but a few hours later, they "flushed" my system. But there was no bad effect at all for K. dizzy.gif

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sarbar
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PostFri Sep 25, 2009 2:31 pm 
What can also come into play is if you grew up on the item - desensitizing in a way. I know people who at 35 had never eaten a wild berry - one guy I hiked with claimed up and down I was poisoning him with red Huckleberries below Mt. Hood - until I ate them first lol.gif But...over indulge and that person is going to have a gut ache and most likely the Hiker 5K later that day or the next day. If one has never eaten it before and goes crazy, it can do real numbers on the system.

https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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Malachai Constant
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PostFri Sep 25, 2009 2:35 pm 
Red elderberries contain small amounts of compounds which can release cyanide (stems and roots contain more). If you cut them up you can get a contact dermatitis similar to poison oak. The compounds are destroyed by cooking.

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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jenjen
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PostFri Sep 25, 2009 6:56 pm 
TrailPair wrote:
A warning about elderberries. They can have an adverse effect on some folks....but not affect others at all. A couple years ago, We picked a bunch of them and took them home to make smoothies. The smoothies were quirte tasty....but a few hours later, they "flushed" my system. But there was no bad effect at all for K. dizzy.gif
Elderberries should always be cooked - that takes care of the gut problems they can cause. They're traditional use is boiled into a syrup or made into jelly.

If life gives you melons - you might be dyslexic
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Chief Joseph
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PostTue Oct 18, 2022 7:42 pm 
We found a downed old growth cedar up behind Silverton that had over 5 lbs of chicken of the woods mushrooms. My son picked them but I was a bit skeptical, but tonight he made a spaghetti sauce and added about a pound and if you didn't know better you would swear it was chicken, turned out great! hungry.gif This thread is funny, even the angry hiking individual posted!

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Chief Joseph
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PostTue Oct 18, 2022 7:48 pm 
Hulksmash wrote:
Oregon Grape?! paranoid.gif paranoid.gif I was not aware those were edible. I believe i read some where....a long, long, long, time ago they were not.
sarbar wrote:
They are ... technically... but lets face it, they don't taste great. As always on those types, kids and women of child bearing age should NOT eat them. Eat too many and your stomach will tell you knock it off ;-
Reminds me of chokecherries that are abundant in ND where I grew up. They are large and purpleish,they look really good, but are very sour, hence the name. They are however pretty good when made into jam or better yet wine. souse.gif
The Angry Hiker wrote:
Grampa and I used to eat wild Choke Berries all the time when I was a kid, though I see on sarbar's page that they are deadly poisonous. Go figure. There are also a couple other plants I occasionally partake in but I don't know their official names. Gramps called them "Sourbone" (probably Sheep Sorrel) and "Jigger Nuts". Did I mention that Grampa was a drinker?
Maybe they are actually Choke Berries? We always referred to them as Choke Cherries, not sure why.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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PostTue Oct 18, 2022 8:55 pm 
Oregon Grape Jelly 2019
Oregon Grape Jelly 2019
it's excellent. really interesting flavor. do not put too much sugar in it!
it will take about a week for your hands to look normal again
it will take about a week for your hands to look normal again
requires one of these gizmos:
Foley Food Mill
Foley Food Mill
I only clicked on this thread because I saw "wild edibles" and I thought you were talking about...
coming soon to a second-growth hemlock stand near you!
coming soon to a second-growth hemlock stand near you!
wink.gif

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."

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cdestroyer
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PostWed Oct 19, 2022 6:55 am 
on hikes in north north cascades I have eaten trail plants. miners lettuce, sheep sorrel, leek, cattail, fireweed and taken franklins grouse, and trout(illegal perhaps but a study in wildlands foods). and I would not touch a shroom even if you paid me(hate them things)

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