Forum Index > Pacific NW History > 1933 Olympic National Forest map
 Reply to topic
Previous :: Next Topic
Author Message
RodF
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 2593 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sequim WA
RodF
Member
PostSun Feb 14, 2010 6:20 pm 
To follow-up on the 1918 ONF map posted earlier, and the 1930 Olympic National Forest map posted by geobob, here is the 1933 Olympic National Forest trail map.  (Thanks to Gay Hardin, Olympic NP archivist, for sharing it.)

title, legend
title, legend
NW: North Snider-Jackson, Bogachiel, Hoh
NW: North Snider-Jackson, Bogachiel, Hoh
SW: Quinault, Humptulips
SW: Quinault, Humptulips
SE: Skokomish, Mt Olson trail
SE: Skokomish, Mt Olson trail
NE: Dungeness, Buckhorn, Graywolf
NE: Dungeness, Buckhorn, Graywolf

For full detail, originals are posted here - simply click on the magnifying glass icon or download them to your computer.

NW: the entire North Snider-Jackson trail is shown from the Bogachiel to the Sol Duc (the Indian Pass and Rugged Ridge sections now survive).  No South Snider-Jackson trail is seen (Bogi-Hoh).  This trail, and the Bogachiel and Hoh trails, have telephone lines on them!

SW: the Finley Ridge Trail is depicted, connecting to the Skyline Trail, Promise Creek Trail, Elip Creek, and Big Creek trails.  The telephone line from Quinault RS goes up Finley Ridge, down Elip Creek, down the N Fk Quinault to Wolf Creek Shelter, up the N Fk to Low Divide Chalet and on to White Water Shelter (Chicago Camp) on the Elwha.
The East Fork Quinault trail has telephone line to Graves Creek Basin Shelter and the Enchanted Valley Chalet.
The complete Wynoochee and Humptulips trails are shown.

SE: Six Ridge Trail is complete, but it looks like there may be two route?  The ... dotted line route past McGravey Lakes is the current trail.  But there's also a mysterious ---- dashed line route, apparently along the north face of Six Ridge?
The Mt. Olson trail is also shown, although a bit wrong (passing west not E of Mt. Olsen and NW not N to O'Neil Cr. Shelter).
Six Ridge and Mt. Olsen were blazed by Chris Morganroth, and his autobiography (p.101) suggests this might not be mapping errors, but might be the route he chose?
The abandoned Hammer Creek trail from Smith Lake is shown.
O'Neil Pass is depicted adjacent to Lake Ben, almost a mile south of its true location.

NE: A dashed line apparently shows the trail to 5050 Pass, later connected to Tunnel Creek trail.
Shelter Rock Camp on the upper Big Quilcene depicts an actual shelter!  This is the first map I've seen which shows that.
On the Constance Pass Trail, it appears there was a shelter at Sunnybrook Meadows!
The Mt. Zion Trail is east of the peak, not SW... hmm!  and it connects to the Deadfall Trail.

So there are some surprises, which bear further investigation!

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 11934 | TRs | Pics
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostSun Feb 14, 2010 6:56 pm 
Note re: map of SW Quinault-Humptulips:

Queets River Trail is shown as following north bank of river to just past un-named drainage just upstream of Paradise Creek, then crosses over to south bank and continues up to what is ( mistakenly ) labeled Alta Creek.
Alta Creek actually enters the Queets just upstream from Pelton, at approximately the same location where the Queets makes the bend ( from north-south to east-west ), immediately west of Kimta Peak.
The creek on the map labeled Alta Creek is actually the approximate location of Hee Hee Creek.
The creek on the map labeled Hee Hee Creek ( upstream of Kilkelly ) is actually the approximate location of Hee Haw Creek.
The early map showing the trail continuing ( along the south bank ) to the approximate location of Hee Hee Creek helps to answer some questions regarding the existence of the "mystery trail" on the upper Queets.
Additionally, if the original location of the upper end of the trail were on the south bank, it would be a reasonable assumption that may have something to do with the last couple miles of "trail" being virtually non-existent.

Thanks very much for digging this up and posting, Rod.

smile.gif

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
ChrisSJI
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jun 2008
Posts: 359 | TRs | Pics
Location: San Juan Island
ChrisSJI
Member
PostSun Feb 14, 2010 10:12 pm 
I see on the NE section there is a Royal Cr Cabin.  There was a cabin up there????

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
RodF
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 2593 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sequim WA
RodF
Member
PostSun Feb 14, 2010 10:34 pm 
ChrisInAKMtns wrote:
I see on the NE section there is a Royal Cr Cabin.  There was a cabin up there????

All the USGS/USFS maps 1930-57 show the cabin at the confluence of Roy or Royal Creek and the Dungeness River, at the NW bank.  A large camp site area now exists there; no sill logs or foundation stones survive to mark the site.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
trestle
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Aug 2008
Posts: 2045 | TRs | Pics
Location: the Oly Pen
trestle
Member
PostWed Feb 17, 2010 9:48 am 
Thanks for posting another great map RodF. I was at the Quilcene FS center the other day and noted the pic of the Slab Camp Guard Station and now I see it on the 1933 map. Do you know any more about this station or can you direct me to history about Slab Camp? I have heard a wide variety of stories about the origin of the name but would love to find out some actual history of that particular area.

Another tidbit just popped out to me:  does anyone know if the trail from Ned Hill down to the Greywolf (just above the junction with the Dungeness) is still passable? And that trail up the ridge of Mt. Zion looks like a good one to find.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
RodF
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 2593 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sequim WA
RodF
Member
PostSat Feb 20, 2010 9:48 am 
johnson37 wrote:
Thanks for posting another great map RodF. I was at the Quilcene FS center the other day and noted the pic of the Slab Camp Guard Station and now I see it on the 1933 map. Do you know any more about this station or can you direct me to history about Slab Camp?"

"Slab Camp received its name many years ago after several boys hiked into the Olympics to camp.  They neglected to take a tent but improvized a shelter from strips of bark they stripped from the trunks of fallen trees.  They boys have long since departed, but the name Slab Camp lingers on.
Ned Hill never had a live-in lookout; the fire guard at Slab Camp went up occasionally during spells of hot, dry weather, to observe the country when fire danger was unusually high."  - Woods Olympic Mountain Trail Guide 3rd 116-7.

The 1918 map depicts a building and telephone (USFS fire reporting station) at the site, and by 1930 the Slab Camp Guard Station shown in the photo displayed at Quilcene RS had been built.  It (with the nearby Ned Hill lookout platform) was part of the chain of fire lookouts which included Blue Mountain, Mt. Zion and Mt. Townsend.

The first direct account I've heard of it is from local hiker John Willis who slept there in 1938-9.  Slab Camp GS was by then not manned, but he slept in it before hiking up the Gray Wolf.  By the 1950s, the buildings had been removed and the car campground loop built.

johnson37 wrote:
Another tidbit just popped out to me:  does anyone know if the trail from Ned Hill down to the Greywolf (just above the junction with the Dungeness) is still passable?

Fragments of it survive.  Construction of FS2870 in the 1950s cut across its east section.  If you park at the FS2870 concrete Gray Wolf bridge and start up the old lower Gray Wolf trail ~300 yards to the first switchback, I believe it continued straight from the there to the ridge.  Sections can be found north of FS2870 following the ridge between the old/lower and new/upper Gray Wolf trailheads.  Further west, much of FS2878-180 was built on the trail, and logging on Ned Hill in the 1960-70s destroyed most of it.  But in sections which were not logged, and near the old Ned Hill lookout trail junction, tread can reportedly be found.

If you'd like to explore for it, call Don Stoneman.  He last hiked it in 1959 and is keen to go look for it.  Here's the best map he has of it, the 1948 ONF map.
1948 ONF map of Ned Hill Trail
1948 ONF map of Ned Hill Trail

johnson37 wrote:
And that trail up the ridge of Mt. Zion looks like a good one to find.

Indeed!

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
RodF
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 2593 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sequim WA
RodF
Member
PostSun Jul 29, 2012 12:13 am 
Further note on the history of Slab Camp

LB wrote:
Hi Rod,

I saw your trip report on nwhikers, Sat Feb 20, 2010 9:48 am   Subject: 1933 Olympic National Forest map.

Here are the guys:

"I have often thought how names of different locations were named, and why.  I think now of the name "Slab Camp".
I was one of the youngest of some of the neighbor boys, when three or four of the teenagers, Tom Tiller, Dewey Bohls, Jim Davidson and myself with five or six hounds would go to the higher mountains for a day or two camping out.  We would go past the Lost Mountain School where we all went to school and just a short distance east of the Caskey homestead we turned left and took a foot trail.  There was no road then, and there were small logs across our path.  Just east of Canyon Creek on the side hill we took slabs of bark from fallen trees and stood them end up over a log so that we had a shelter only about four feet high.  We would crawl into the shelter to spend the night, ready the next morning to go for higher ground.  The name "Slab Camp" for that area is still with us."
- Harry Benson McFarland

From Jimmy Come Lately.

Ref: Jervis Russell, Jimmy Come Lately: History of Clallam County, Clallam County Historical Society, 1971 (out of print, available in North Olympic Library System).

Harry Benson McFarland (1898 - 1976) was raised and later retired in the Port Angeles area.  Lost Mountain School taught 1st through 8th grade, so his reminiscence might be from ca. 1910-1912.

The trail the boys took from the end of Lost Mountain Road is depicted on the 1911 Olympic National Forest map and would become the route of the original CCC Road to Slab Camp Guard Station.

Thanks to LB, local friend of history, for this note.

--------------
"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
trestle
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Aug 2008
Posts: 2045 | TRs | Pics
Location: the Oly Pen
trestle
Member
PostMon Jul 30, 2012 7:48 am 
Thanks LB and RodF for the updates. I've read through Jimmy Come Lately before but had forgotten about the Slab Camp references.

RodF, is that a road connecting Lost Mountain with Blue Mountain, crossing over McDonald Creek, on the 1911 map? I'm having a hard time with that map this morning..

--------------
"Life favors the prepared." - Edna Mode
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
RodF
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Sep 2007
Posts: 2593 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sequim WA
RodF
Member
PostMon Jul 30, 2012 3:21 pm 
johnson37 wrote:
RodF, is that a road connecting Lost Mountain with Blue Mountain, crossing over McDonald Creek, on the 1911 map?

Yes it is.  The 1923 and 1930 Olympic NF maps also show this direct connection between Lost Mountain Road and Gellor (Blue Mountain) Road, crossing McDonald Creek just above its forks, and crossing the Carlsborg Mill & Timber Company logging railway line on the east branch of McDonald Creek.  This is a minor mystery, as the "canyon" is so steep, it's hard to believe a road could every have existed on this direct route.  I can only suspect this is a mapping error?

It's possible that Clallam County Historical Society or Sequim MAC might have old gazetteers or Metsker maps that might shed more light on this?

The 1938 Dungeness 15-minute topo (US Army/USGS) and 1941 Olympic NF maps show no such direct route, but instead show what's locally known as "the CCC Road", FS2875-050 connecting Slab Camp/Lost Mountain and Blue Mountain Roads, contouring further south around the upper McDonald Creek drainage.  (The west/Blue Mtn end of this state 4177 road was closed about 5 years ago by DNR when they finished logging, and the section of FS2875-050 west of -052 junction was bermed closed by USFS but is still hikable).

The 1938 and 1941 maps  also depict the Carlsborg railway route as a trail (I guess it was by then abandoned, and the track pulled out?).  This would be a worthy exploration for a winter day, though it is reportedly covered with numerous windfall logs.

--------------
"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
   All times are GMT - 8 Hours
 Reply to topic
Forum Index > Pacific NW History > 1933 Olympic National Forest map
  Happy Birthday slabbyd, Opus, awaygirl, cdestroyer!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum