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dave allyn
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dave allyn
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PostWed Jan 18, 2023 3:38 pm 
Interesting annual report from Chelan County Mountain Rescue. https://www.flipsnack.com/78698A5569B/ccmr-annual-report-2022-vxiyuxgseo.html This is my first attempt at adding a link. If it doesn't work, sorry.

Now I Fly, SeanSullivan86, fourteen410, SpookyKite89, peter707, Nancyann, awilsondc, zimmertr, runup, Bramble_Scramble, HitTheTrail
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HitTheTrail
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PostWed Jan 18, 2023 3:56 pm 
Hmmmm, I see some familiar faces in that lineup. Thanks for all of your dedicated support in the backcountry. Keep up the good work

dave allyn
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HitTheTrail
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PostSat Jan 21, 2023 5:16 am 
This annual report is summarized in todays Wenatchee weekend paper. https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/news/chelan-county-mountain-rescue-association-reports-spike-in-rescues/article_240c6e44-9787-11ed-ab19-8b2085e66437.html/?utm_medium=internal&utm_source=readerShare&utm_campaign=bButton If you can't make the link work then here is the text: Chelan County Mountain Rescue Association reports spike in rescues CHELAN COUNTY — The Chelan County Mountain Rescue Association reported a 93% increase in missions from 2021 to 2022 in its annual report. The all-volunteer nonprofit organization invested 775 hours into 28 missions last year. The association is comprised of 27 active volunteers to assist the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office in rescuing hikers and climbers in the backcountry, including mountain terrain, sometimes during extreme conditions. CCMRA president, Vernon Nelson, said the increase year-over-year is likely related to more frequency of visitors in the backcountry. “People have noticed that The Enchantments (Lakes) are busier and busier. It’s really a numbers game, the more time people spend outdoors, the more likely accidents happen,” Nelson said. Nelson added people can more easily access help thanks to the improvement in communication methods, even just over the last decade. Smartphone SOS features and improved technology allows for people to seek assistance rather than “30 years ago, people would more likely have to get themselves out.” “There’s also been a decrease in overdue searches with hikers and climbers able to let loved ones know they’re okay or ask for assistance (with smartphone SOS features) sooner,” Nelson said. Of those 28 missions, 11% were “saves” which are considered missions where a life would’ve been lost without immediate response from the rescue volunteers. Nelson said two particular incidents — an injured hiker with both legs and an arm stuck under a boulder on Lake Viviane in October and a snowshoer lost during a snowstorm in January — were flagged as saves. “The snowshoer … very well could’ve frozen to death,” Nelson said. Approximately 78% of the missions were dubbed “rescues,” meaning volunteers saved someone, however death was not imminent. One particular mission that was deemed a rescue was on Dragontail Peak in early October when two climbers’ ropes were stuck and the pair couldn’t rappel down. Nelson said this was a “rescue” because if the volunteers weren’t able to reach the two for whatever reason, the climbers “would have eventually figured it out.” The remainder of the missions, 11% were recoveries, which is when the team recovers a body of someone who died. October racked up the most rescues of the year at six. July and August had a handful of rescues as well, tied for five rescues for each month. Nelson accredited the peak in rescues partially due to limited air support from helicopters, which often triggers the sheriff’s office to call in CCRMA. According to Nelson, during changing weather and extreme heat, it makes air service more difficult to execute. “(The peak in the fall) isn’t just limited air support though,” Nelson said. “The changing weather and short days in the fall; the changing conditions in the mountains catch people off guard. It’ll be 70 degrees in Wenatchee and cold and stormy up there (in the mountains).” Funding for the organization comes from 85 individual donors and grants, this year one came from Gesa Credit Union and another from Community Foundation of NCW. According to the annual report, 91% of the funding supports equipment and the rescue organization’s wish list includes a drone and communications gear as well as training opportunities.

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SeanSullivan86
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PostThu Jan 26, 2023 9:11 am 
HitTheTrail wrote:
Nelson said this was a “rescue” because if the volunteers weren’t able to reach the two for whatever reason, the climbers “would have eventually figured it out.”
Sorry to make light of the subject, but I had a chuckle at this line. Thanks to all the volunteers.

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