Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Stereoscopic photos of Pacific Northwest
 Reply to topic
Previous :: Next Topic
Author Message
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 6674 | TRs | Pics
Location: on the beach
Schroder
Member
PostMon Nov 20, 2023 9:41 am 
I noticed a photo caption in a documentary I was watching and looked up the photographer. There was a business in Snohomish around 1906 called Blosser Scenic Art Company and they did steroscopic photos in the area. Some of these are preserved in the Library of Congress.
Glacier Basin and Cadet Peak
Glacier Basin and Cadet Peak
A web search on J. A. Blosser shows other photos of his scattered on many websites and here's more on the Library of Congress

Slugman, Anne Elk, RichP
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Tom
Admin



Joined: 15 Dec 2001
Posts: 17820 | TRs | Pics
Tom
Admin
PostMon Nov 20, 2023 12:44 pm 
Interesting, is there a way to view them in stereo?

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Schroder
Member
Member


Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 6674 | TRs | Pics
Location: on the beach
Schroder
Member
PostMon Nov 20, 2023 12:55 pm 
Tom wrote:
Interesting, is there a way to view them in stereo?
Through a technique described here: How to View Stereoscopic 3-D Images: Free-Viewing and Using Stereoscopes

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Dick B
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 327 | TRs | Pics
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
Member
PostFri Nov 24, 2023 8:12 pm 
Tom wrote:
Interesting, is there a way to view them in stereo?
Way back when i was doing forestry work, we used aerial photos all the time to determine preliminary road locations, and future logging areas. We had to have stereo pairs in order to see the topo features. Photos were shot with special aerial cameras mounted so the photos we shot thru a hole in the underside of the plane's fuselage. The photos were exposed in a sequence along a flight line. They overlapped that allowed any object on the ground be seen from more than one photo. This meant that a portion of what was on one photo could be seen on the next photo but from a slightly different angle. That is the key to seeing in 3 dimension. In the field we used a small stereoscope which had folding legs and you could put it in your pocket. We had larger desk top models for use in the office. By looking thru the left lens with the left eye and the same with the right the image you saw was in 3D. One summer I was on a job that required that we made frequent use of aerial photos. One day I was in the rig with time to kill, so I started to try to see in 3D without the aid of a stereoscope. I was quickly able to focus in on an image on the left photo with my left eye and the same image with my right eye on the right photo. The limit to what you could see was only as far as your eyes are apart. It was a really neat experience. Unfortunately, I lost partial vision in my left eye several years ago which took away my depth perception and my ability to see photos in 3D. If one were to get a print of the photo displayed in this thread and find a stereo scope you would be able to see it in 3d. Depending on the scope you may have to separate the 2 photos to get them to align with the scope lens. Or you could fool around and do it with the naked eye. I have done it many times in the past, but no more. I'm sure the photo shown was taken with a special camera with 2 lens and was a special camera to only shoot stereoscopic images. Let us know if anyone has any success. Oh yes. Does anyone remember the old Sawyer View-Masters?

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
IanB
Vegetable Belayer



Joined: 21 Jul 2010
Posts: 1060 | TRs | Pics
Location: gone whuljin'
IanB
Vegetable Belayer
PostSat Nov 25, 2023 10:55 am 
Schroder wrote:
Through a technique described here: How to View Stereoscopic 3-D Images: Free-Viewing and Using Stereoscopes
I find it nearly impossible to "parallel" view as my eye muscles tend to go more cross-eyed when fatigued. Yet almost all the stereo images I try to view resolve correctly and easily. So I find it odd that the author writes that "Most Victorian and modern stereoviews are in the parallel-view format..."

"Forget gaining a little knowledge about a lot and strive to learn a lot about a little." - Harvey Manning
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
cdestroyer
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Sep 2015
Posts: 1244 | TRs | Pics
Location: montana
cdestroyer
Member
PostSat Nov 25, 2023 12:50 pm 
stereoscope probably more commonly called stereo opticon. I have not seen one in many years. after some research I realize I have been calling an object incorrectly...an opticon is more like a projector instead of a handheld device....my bad......

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 6896 | TRs | Pics
Kim Brown
Member
PostSat Nov 25, 2023 9:09 pm 
I purchased a book from Mtn Loop Coffee & Books several years ago - written by j. Harlen Bretz before he knew the water source of the Bretz Floods. In it was a set of maps 8 stereoscopic cards - the whole thing - book, maps, stereoscope cards - was in pristine condition. Stereoscopes can be found on line; I never bought one for the book, but looked at the photos using an old stereoscope a neighbor had. Stereoscope cards were popular then; for maps, books, souvenirs. Looking at the photos through a stereoscope is like looking at the old ViewMaster reels; 3D viewing.

"..living on the east side of the Sierra world be ideal - except for harsher winters and the chance of apocalyptic fires burning the whole area." Bosterson, NWHiker's marketing expert
Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Bernardo
Member
Member


Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 2174 | TRs | Pics
Location: out and about in the world
Bernardo
Member
PostSun Nov 26, 2023 10:16 am 
I turned my phone horizontal and expanded the images to fill the screen. I then tried to stare at the two images through my left and right eyes separately and after a few moments the three men in the foreground stood out. It helped to hold the phone at half armís length. Once you feel it snap into 3-D donít let go. Move your head a bit. Mesmerizing and very cool. Thanks for posting. smile.gif

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
mike
Member
Member


Joined: 09 Jul 2004
Posts: 6379 | TRs | Pics
Location: SJIsl
mike
Member
PostSun Nov 26, 2023 11:27 am 
Dick B wrote:
Way back when i was doing forestry work, we used aerial photos all the time to determine preliminary road locations, and future logging areas. We had to have stereo pairs in order to see the topo features......
I did the same thing. Estimating timber volume and species. I had stereo pairs from Mt Si to the Canadian border. Also for much of Vancouver Island as the company had purchased a bunch of land from Mc-Blo. I used something like this: Carried something like this in the field:

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Dick B
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 327 | TRs | Pics
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
Member
PostSun Nov 26, 2023 7:29 pm 
Tom wrote:
Interesting, is there a way to view them in stereo?
If the naked Eye method doesn't work, here is what I would suggest. Go on EBay and plug in "Pocket Stereoscopes" There will be all kinds of models. The ones I always used in the field were made by Abrams. There are some available that are army surplus. Several are for sale at prices ranging from $15 to $35. I believe these models would be perfect to view the attached photo and any others that you can download off the JA Blosser site. There looks like a lot of pictures available that would be interesting in seeing in 3D. I wish I could see out of both eyes. If it were so I would get a stereoscope, obtain the pictures, and view them in a NY minute. I don't know the procedure for downloading and printing the pictures which you would have to do to view them. There are 2 other sources for new scopes. Topcon sells models from $64 to $72. and Sokkia @$70. Google pocket stereoscopes. Let us know how you make out.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Bowregard
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Feb 2019
Posts: 561 | TRs | Pics
Location: Sammamish
Bowregard
Member
PostSun Nov 26, 2023 10:02 pm 
My FIL has a stereoscope and a number of cards to view with it that have the same format. He was not around in 1906 so I assume it was either an antique he purchased or was passed down in the family. Thanks for posting.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Dick B
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 327 | TRs | Pics
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
Member
PostTue Nov 28, 2023 12:18 pm 
Here is a suggestion for those that like to take pictures and can get access to a stereo viewer. On your next hike take a picture of a scene, then move the camera a couple of inches to the right and take another. You will have created a stereo pair. Get the 2 pictures printed, then view thru the viewer, left pic on the left right on the right. The result should be in 3D. You could also to try to view without a viewer. There are many beautiful pictures posted by folks on this forum. I think you might enjoy your pictures even more if you could view in 3 dimension. I wish I could show proof that this might work, but with mono vision it is not possible. Let us know the results.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Tom
Admin



Joined: 15 Dec 2001
Posts: 17820 | TRs | Pics
Tom
Admin
PostTue Nov 28, 2023 12:33 pm 
Is the effect similar to 3D photos you can create on FB? Here is a sample: https://www.facebook.com/help/iphone-app/414295416095269 Modern cell phones take multiple images for every shot, so the effect is probably better if it uses that information rather than generate from a still: https://blog.google/products/photos/new-cinematic-photos-and-more-ways-relive-your-memories/

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
catsp
Member
Member


Joined: 15 Jun 2017
Posts: 227 | TRs | Pics
catsp
Member
PostThu Nov 30, 2023 11:12 am 
Ah yes, it brings back memories of the old Meta Quest 2. Anyone remember that old thing? Nice little video explanation and helpful hints here: The science behind the Magic Eye craze of the 1990s. BTW, little tip for anyone having trouble free eyeing it: Try adjusting the size of the pic. If you're trying it on your desktop, for example, the pic might be too big for your eye spacing.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
Dick B
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 327 | TRs | Pics
Location: Redmond, Or
Dick B
Member
PostThu Nov 30, 2023 1:18 pm 
Professionally shot aerial photos came from a camera that made a 9x9 contact print. in order to view it with the free eye method, or with a pocket stereo, the portions of the 2 photos that were to be seen in stereo could only be as far apart as your eyes. Therefore, one of the photos had to be curled up and moved around until the co-imagery superimposed on each other. The desk top stereos with the mirrors, allowed a much wider separation of the stereo pairs. As I remember I could lay a stereo pair under the scope and it would pick up the stereo imagery for the entire portions of the 2 photos that were on both prints. It's been a long time since I viewed a stereo pair without a scope, but here is what I think I remember. What I would do is stare off in the distance, so my eyes were aligned in a parallel mode. Then, at arm's length, I would slowly lift the photos into my line of vision, while concentrating on still staring straight ahead. In a little while I was able to view the left photo with my left eye and right with my right. I would then see the 2 images as a single miraged image. The trick then was to be able to bring the images into focus as it was only at arm's length. Then the photos had to be moved slightly until the 2 images were perfectly aligned. When this was accomplished, I had a 3D image.

Back to top Reply to topic Reply with quote Send private message
   All times are GMT - 8 Hours
 Reply to topic
Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Stereoscopic photos of Pacific Northwest
  Happy Birthday moosefish!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum