Forum Index > Public Lands Stewardship > A population of hard-to-eradicate ‘super pigs’ in Canada is threatening to invade the US
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Randito
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Randito
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PostTue Nov 28, 2023 9:15 pm 
In the 19th century there was a bounty on wolves -- which why they were pretty much eradicated in Washington by the 1930s. Seems like that would work , except for all the animal rights advocates organizing protests.

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treeswarper
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PostSat Dec 02, 2023 5:56 pm 
domaz wrote:
I don't think we can eat our way out of this issue unless the price of conventional pork meat goes up. The labor in hunting and processing a wild population is going to be way way higher than the cost of conventionally raised pork. That's just the reality, unless you can convince people it's tastier or more ethical to eat, both of which is a hard sell in today's environment.
Depends on the marketing. These pigs would definitely be "free range" have had happy lives, and are likely organic, or as organic as they can be. I think of wild game meat as happy meat. The animal has had a free life and not a lot of stress like trucking and crowding in a feed lot. Save the wildlands, eat a wild pig.

What's especially fun about sock puppets is that you can make each one unique and individual, so that they each have special characters. And they don't have to be human––animals and aliens are great possibilities

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Logbear
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PostSat Dec 02, 2023 11:58 pm 
“There is no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.” – Sir Ranulph Fiennes
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Ski
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PostSun Dec 03, 2023 8:15 am 
Ski on Oct 10 2013 wrote:
WDFW, DNR, and ONF worked together to get rid of the feral hogs up on the peninsula in less than three years.
I spoke on the telephone with a guy at WDFW about the hogs that got loose from the Quinault Reservation and were spotted on the DNR lands between the Quinault Reservation and Olympic National Park. The three agencies cooperated and they simply declared open season on the animals: no license, no permit, no dusk-to-dawn curfew, no weapons restrictions, use of hounds allowed. Only catch was: they wanted ALL kills reported with date, place, time, and weight. First year, he told me they bagged a few 400-pounders. Second year, much smaller, Third year, GONE. If you allow the problem to get out of control, as it has in Texas and Louisiana, you can start up whole new industries manufacturing hog traps or selling tickets to tourists who want to shoot wild hogs from a helicopter with an AR15 semi-automatic rifle What could possibly be more fun? (I know what I'm asking Santa for Christmas!!!) * member of PETA - People Eating Tasty Animals * (because nothing compares to the aroma and taste of seared parts of dead animal limbs! *)

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domaz
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PostSun Dec 03, 2023 7:51 pm 
Randito wrote:
In the 19th century there was a bounty on wolves -- which why they were pretty much eradicated in Washington by the 1930s.
A bounty would probably work if it was significant enough. $500 per animal or so? Otherwise no one is going to bother, inflation, higher minimum wage etc..

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treeswarper
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PostMon Dec 04, 2023 6:22 am 
domaz wrote:
Randito wrote:
In the 19th century there was a bounty on wolves -- which why they were pretty much eradicated in Washington by the 1930s.
A bounty would probably work if it was significant enough. $500 per animal or so? Otherwise no one is going to bother, inflation, higher minimum wage etc..
No bounty needed, just open season, no license, no fees. There are a lot of people who like to hunt. This would be their dream. Permit hounds to be used, and don't restrict it much. Of course, the usual rules about hunting in towns and rich people enclaves would have to be followed, along with hunting by permission on private property. Those folks exist and they'll go for it.

What's especially fun about sock puppets is that you can make each one unique and individual, so that they each have special characters. And they don't have to be human––animals and aliens are great possibilities

Ski
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Chief Joseph
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PostMon Dec 04, 2023 12:43 pm 
domaz wrote:
Randito wrote:
In the 19th century there was a bounty on wolves -- which why they were pretty much eradicated in Washington by the 1930s.
A bounty would probably work if it was significant enough. $500 per animal or so? Otherwise no one is going to bother, inflation, higher minimum wage etc..
Idaho has a bounty of $500 on wolves and up to 2k i the far northern tip of the state. I know a guy there who shot one, I think he was paid 500 and used that money to get the hide prepared to hang on his wall. I heard that there is a small pack that hangs out in Bismark meadows next to Nordman and close to my place there. They likely travel between PL and into far NE WA...one thing I noticed is that once the wolves moved in, the coyotes moved out. https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/idaho-reaches-deal-to-reimburse-hunters-who-kill-wolves/277-d2973130-d29a-40df-ab33-e9cd435667f6#:~:text=The%20group%20is%20paying%20%242%2C000,the%20state%2C%20and%20%24500%20elsewhere.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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thunderhead
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PostWed Dec 06, 2023 6:53 pm 
treeswarper wrote:
No bounty needed, just open season, no license, no fees. There are a lot of people who like to hunt. This would be their dream.
Indeed. This is a problem that is very easy to solve. Especially in this state where our deer and elk herds are substandard and have lesser hunting prospects. TONS of dudes would jump on this. When i was in the southeast we would often see wild hogs all over, and it was open season so we would sometimes bring our hunting rifles no matter what else we were doing. Naturally the hogs would show themselves whenever we didnt bring the guns.

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Chief Joseph
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Chief Joseph
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PostWed Dec 06, 2023 10:44 pm 
Yea, we don't need a bounty, there are enough hunters and people that would love to grill up some wild pig. That's what they do with some invasive fish species, open season all year in an attempt to control-eradicate their numbers.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Sculpin
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PostThu Dec 07, 2023 9:09 am 
Chief Joseph wrote:
open season all year in an attempt to control-eradicate their numbers.
That's what both Texas and California already have, no restrictions at all. You don't even need a hunting license in Texas! I found this distribution map from the USDA:
The map shows eradication has been very successful in the northern half of the country. It also shows that they are likely to make into south central Washington again at some point.

Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir

Chief Joseph
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jinx'sboy
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PostSun Dec 10, 2023 7:10 am 
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Randito
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Randito
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PostSun Dec 10, 2023 8:42 am 
domaz wrote:
Randito wrote:
In the 19th century there was a bounty on wolves -- which why they were pretty much eradicated in Washington by the 1930s.
A bounty would probably work if it was significant enough. $500 per animal or so? Otherwise no one is going to bother, inflation, higher minimum wage etc..
I believe the Washington wolf bounty in 1900 was $20. Adjusted for inflation that would be ~$600 The tricky part is avoiding the problem that occurred in India with a bounty on Cobras, people started breeding the snakes to collect the bounty.

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Malachai Constant
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Malachai Constant
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PostSun Dec 10, 2023 9:55 am 
Breeding wild boars is a lot more hassle than breeding cobras especially if you have been anywhere near a pig farm.

"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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