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Schroder
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 8:56 am 
In 1950 the world had a population of about 2.5 billion. We're at 8 billion now. Most experts say we're going to top out at 10 billion in 2085 and then have a rapid decline. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/09/18/opinion/human-population-global-growth.html

Anne Elk
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Chief Joseph
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 9:13 am 
And yet some think that we have a shortage of people in this country, leading to a shortage of workers...more likely there are just too many people that don't want to work.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Cyclopath
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 10:18 am 
Schroder wrote:
In 1950 the world had a population of about 2.5 billion. We're at 8 billion now. Most experts say we're going to top out at 10 billion in 2085 and then have a rapid decline. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/09/18/opinion/human-population-global-growth.html
I hope they're right, because the other realistic scenario is the combination of sea level rise, wildfire, fisheries collapse, loss of farming productivity, drought, and extreme heat becomes too much for civilization to cope with at the same time.

Anne Elk
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Ski
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 10:25 am 
2085 lol.gif that is funny. they'll run out of drinking water before then.

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Chief Joseph
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 2:17 pm 
"Rapid Decline"...yea like mankind will disappear like the dinosaurs, either die of thirst or burn up...lack of oxygen?

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Schroder
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 3:28 pm 
Ski wrote:
2085 lol.gif that is funny. they'll run out of drinking water before then.
You don't think water resources can support 20% more people? I don't think that's a problem but food may be. In the article, the University of Washington says peak population may be only 40 years away. I met a researcher from this institute when I was hiking down from Lake Serene and we walked together for most of the trail. His outlook was not very positive for humanity.

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Anne Elk
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 4:01 pm 
Schroder wrote:
You don't think water resources can support 20% more people? I don't think that's a problem but food may be.
Same thing, given the need to irrigate. And we're talking potable water. I was just reading an article recently about water problems in Louisiana b/c of the rising sea levels infiltrating the ground supply. Probably the same in FL. I took it as an early warning when the city of Seattle public utilities asked its customers to voluntarily conserve in Oct-Nov b/c our reservoirs were down below what they usually are this time of year. I also get the impression that there are a number of issues with Lake Whatcom that could seriously impact Bellingham before long. (As it is their H2O direct from the tap tastes like pond scum.)

"There are yahoos out there. It’s why we can’t have nice things." - Tom Mahood
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Ski
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 7:06 pm 
forecast isn't looking good long-term for fresh drinking water supplies globally, Schroder.

"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Cyclopath
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PostMon Dec 11, 2023 7:21 pm 
Anne Elk wrote:
I was just reading an article recently about water problems in Louisiana b/c of the rising sea levels infiltrating the ground supply.
Sadly this is getting to be a problem and not just in Louisiana. Ghost forests creep up U.S. East Coast New Jersey's Atlantic white cedar forests are turning from green to a pale white, a sign of creeping sea levels and more frequent superstorms. https://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/ghost-forests-creep-us-east-coast-rcna2142 The ghost forests of the East Coast Far from being frighteningly fun, ghost forests are a growing problem along much of the East Coast. Ghost forests, as scientists refer to them, provide a stark visual indicator of sea-level rise. Bare, pale trunks line areas where once healthy coastal forests thrived. These coastal forests just can't keep pace with the encroaching saltwater that is creeping farther inland into the soil and surface waters of the coastal plain. This combination of saltwater intrusion and forest retreat is transforming freshwater landscapes long before rising seas permanently inundate the land. https://phys.org/news/2017-11-ghost-forests-east-coast.html#:~:text=Ghost%20forests%2C%20as%20scientists%20refer%20to%20them%2C%20provide,soil%20and%20surface%20waters%20of%20the%20coastal%20plain. As seas rise, a Florida Keys ‘ghost forest’ makes a last stand Just three decades ago, when he started studying the forests, healthy pineland grew on at least 10 islands. Today, the forests are thinning or gone. The only healthy tract stands on Big Pine. https://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/2020/01/20/as-seas-rise-a-florida-keys-ghost-forest-makes-a-last-stand/

Anne Elk
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Schroder
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PostTue Dec 12, 2023 7:06 am 
Multiple issues here on water but almost any water can be treated to be drinkable. It only takes money and energy. Brings to mind a conversation I had many years ago at a chemical engineering conference. I was seated next to someone from "cancer alley" between Baton Rouge and New Orleans at dinner and he turned to me and said "I can't believe y'all drink tap water up here".

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Chief Joseph
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PostTue Dec 12, 2023 7:05 pm 
I am glad I don't live in town anymore, the Marysville water was horrible. When I moved out of my place I left it clean and also scrubbed the toilet. A couple of weeks later I asked the landlord how things looked? He said fine except for the toilet. Apparently the water turns black after sitting for a period of time. I wonder which chemical does that? Can't be good for consumption.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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Chief Joseph
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PostTue Dec 12, 2023 8:37 pm 
Some of the best water is the Artesian well off the 164th exit at I-5...seems there is always a line, no matter the hour. The city planned to shut it down several years ago but I think due to public outcry, they kept it open. I used to sometimes go there for beer brewing water because Marysville's sucked so bad. Luckily now I have good water in 2 wells at my property here and in Idaho.

Go placidly amid the noise and waste, and remember what comfort there may be in owning a piece thereof.
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BeardoMcGrath
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PostFri Dec 15, 2023 5:45 am 
Schroder wrote:
In the article, the University of Washington says peak population may be only 40 years away. I met a researcher from this institute when I was hiking down from Lake Serene and we walked together for most of the trail. His outlook was not very positive for humanity.
I also work at this institute and this was a big deal when it was published. I didn't work on this project but the gist is that as countries reach "developed" status birth rates go way down, below replacement level. This would already be the case in the US without immigration. However wrt this thread I would guess places that are desirable for scenic beauty or other reasons (like NW Wyoming) will remain so.

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mike
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PostFri Dec 15, 2023 10:08 am 
Chief Joseph wrote:
the water turns black after sitting for a period of time. I wonder which chemical does that? Can't be good for consumption.
H˛S Hydrogen sulfide maybe? Not good.

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Stefan
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PostThu Dec 21, 2023 3:17 pm 
Schroder wrote:
In 1950 the world had a population of about 2.5 billion. We're at 8 billion now. Most experts say we're going to top out at 10 billion in 2085 and then have a rapid decline. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/09/18/opinion/human-population-global-growth.html
I can't seem to find any....what were past predictions of the number of people and when the human population would top out at? I tried finding them. I tried even using ChatGPT. No answers to my question. My point is, if we reach 2085, will the numbers keep going up and the predictors are wrong? I think 3.5 billion people on the planet is good enough for sustainability. Since we past it long ago...we have well passed the "turning point" on this global heating thingy.

Art is an adventure.
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