Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Old logging and lumbering towns.
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Schroder
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PostSun Feb 04, 2024 1:45 pm 
Two miles east of Issaquah was the High Point mill through the 1920's. Their supply was primarily from Tiger Mountain and they had a railroad up its slopes. The grandparents of a good friend of mine owned this mill.
High Point Mill camp & railroad on Tiger Mountain 1926; Kinsey
High Point Mill camp & railroad on Tiger Mountain 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey
High point Mill 1926; Kinsey

JimK, zimmertr, RichP, Malachai Constant
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Schroder
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PostMon Feb 05, 2024 10:04 am 
I just remembered Monohon on the east shore of Lake Sammamish. This mill ran from 1889 to 1980 and we would drive right through the middle of it on East Lake Sammamish Parkway.
Monohon in 1910; Museum of History & Industry Collection
Monohon in 1910; Museum of History & Industry Collection
HistoryLink article on Monohon Wordpress article on history of Monohon
Monohon location
Monohon location

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Bazetech
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PostMon Feb 05, 2024 6:30 pm 
My Grampa had a house on the beach just to the right of where that photo was taken in Glendale. Spent a lot of time playing on the beach and boiling crab right in front of the house.

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." ~Mark Twain
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Dick B
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PostMon Feb 05, 2024 7:49 pm 
For the brief time I spent in 2 different logging camps, I discovered there was a culture that prevailed. During my forestry career, I came to admire the work ethic that loggers displayed. They worked hard in a very dangerous environment and in all kinds of weather. Here are a couple of things I remember about my woods camp experiences. GRISDALE CAMP: Single men, living in the bunkhouse, took their meals (breakfast and Dinner) in the company cook house. Many of the men had worked there for quite a long time and there were certain things that were sacred.to them. A newbie learned, early on, that you didn't just take any old place at the table. Each old timer had his own spot and had no problem pointing this out. I and our graduating class were at Glenwood to get some field experience, cruising timber for the company. This was the last half of our last quarter in school. When 10 or15 of us "college guys" descended on the camp we were not held in high regard. We learned early on how we were expected to fit into the camp society. PILOT ROCK WOODS CAMP: My regular living arrangement for the summer I worked for the lumber company was in a hotel room in Pilot Rock. I spent only a short time at the woods camp. The camp also had a men's bunkhouse for sleeping, and the men took their meals in the cook house. Besides breakfast and dinner, the camp cook, a lady, made lunches available for the crews to take to the woods. Lunches were carried in a tin lunch bucket. One day after lunch, one of the crew caught a field mouse. and put it in another guy's empty lunch pail. Unbeknownst to the guy carrying the mouse, he brought it back to the cook house at the end of the day. The lady cook would go thru and empty all that was left in the buckets prior to packing a lunch for the next day. On that occasion she and her husband were visiting with some friends while she was prepping the pails. The conversation happened to center around what to do if confronted with a rattle snake. At that time, she he came upon the pail with the mouse. She opened it without looking and apparently, the mouse ran up her arm nearly giving her a heart attack. Her husband knew who the lunch pail belonged to, so he stormed next door to the bunkhouse with fire in his eyes. He confronted the poor guy that owned the bucket thinking he had placed the mouse there on purpose as a joke. I guess the guys that perpetrated the stunt fessed up and the matter got resolved with apologies. They were told to not pull that stunt again. The cook recovered.

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Dick B
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PostMon Feb 05, 2024 8:41 pm 
Bazetech wrote:
My Grampa had a house on the beach just to the right of where that photo was taken in Glendale. Spent a lot of time playing on the beach and boiling crab right in front of the house.
I was born and lived at Cultus Bay in the late 30s and thru the 40s. Us kids were always looking for things to do thru the summer. As such we would make frequent trips to Glendale to fish off the dock. I remember the old hotel. I don't think any ever lived in it. We occasionally fished Glendale Creek and the beaver ponds up stream. Sometimes we would catch a few sea run cutthroat trout. Also fished off the dock at Possession. We could dig clams (horse, butter and steamers) in the bay when the tide was out. Geoducks and crabs at extreme low tide.

Bazetech, Waterman
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HitTheTrail
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PostTue Feb 06, 2024 7:01 am 
Here is a brief history of the Ardenvoir sawmill in the upper Entiat valley. It started in Waterville in 1888, then moved to the mouth of the Entiat river in 1892, before moving up to the mouth of Mills Canyon a few miles up the Entiat river in 1917 where it was called the Kellogg mill. The next move was up Mudd Creek a few miles above Ardenvoir before it finally settled in the final location in Ardenvoir in 1932. The article has an interesting quote about one of the Harris sons. " Arden partially retired in the 1940s and moved to Phoenix, Arizona, where he bought and operated a citrus orchard. His son Charles then took over top management of the lumber and fruit businesses. Charles had graduated from Entiat High School, and graduated magna cum laude from the University of Washington, where he later served on the Board of Regents and of the university, both as a regent and as the board president." I vividly remember exploring the old mill site in Mud Creek when growing up. There was a lot of evidence left at that time. I hiked it around 15 years ago and found several concrete house foundations in the creek bottom. Unfortunately, several major fires and lots of brush have pretty much wiped it all out. I am sure you could find the old foundations in the creek brush if you wanted to brush bash. Google earth indicates what is probably one up on the hillside.

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HitTheTrail
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PostTue Feb 06, 2024 5:26 pm 
Here are some mill photos from a book on the Entiat valley.

Ski
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Bazetech
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PostTue Feb 06, 2024 5:37 pm 
I've hunted near ardenvoir up on mckensy saddle. Near the bottom of the hill though is like a jail cell or something built into the rock face. Any idea what that may have been?

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." ~Mark Twain
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HitTheTrail
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PostWed Feb 07, 2024 6:30 am 
Bazetech wrote:
Near the bottom of the hill though is like a jail cell or something built into the rock face.
Not sure what this has to do with old logging towns. Other than the fact that virtually all the roads on Tyee Ridge were built as logging roads. I grew up around 2 miles from McKenize Saddle and spent a lot of time on Tyee ridge and have never seen or heard any reference to that feature.
McKenzie Saddle
McKenzie Saddle

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Seventy2002
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PostWed Feb 07, 2024 12:49 pm 
Bazetech wrote:
like a jail cell or something built into the rock face.
Powder magazine?

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Bazetech
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PostThu Feb 08, 2024 8:45 am 
This is a picture of the feature I was asking about

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." ~Mark Twain
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HitTheTrail
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PostThu Feb 08, 2024 9:07 am 
Well how ironic! You didn't say it was down on the Mad River road at the junction of the Tillicum Cr. road. That is what's left of old man Charlie Grey's final house. It was his family that started a couple of the saw mills in the area. His mills are #1 and #7 on my map in the above post. What you are seeing is what's left of his root cellar. They had a really nice homesite there by the Mad River. Even though he did illegally dam Mad River in front of his house so they could sit by a nice pond. The FS has since removed everything but that facility in your photo. You can still see parts of the dam as you turn up the Tillicum Cr. road.

day_hike_mike, Bazetech
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Jake
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PostThu Feb 08, 2024 9:25 am 
Thanks H T T for the history of that relic. That is interesting.

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HitTheTrail
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PostThu Feb 08, 2024 9:28 am 
Jake wrote:
Thanks H T T for the history of that relic. That is interesting.
Charlie Gray's root cellar.
Charlie Gray's root cellar.

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Bazetech
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PostThu Feb 08, 2024 9:46 am 
Thank you for the info! I forgot the names of the roads and all that. Pretty cool history

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." ~Mark Twain
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