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Lokicat
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Lokicat
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PostSat Oct 16, 2021 8:19 am 
mike wrote:
Yes, those are the ones. I have modified that a bit. I added the mini clip adapters which gives a bit more length to easily get the camera to my eye without unclipping. Use the same mini clips to attach the neck strap. Also add the stabilizer-strap
Does your sweat fog-up the back of the camera (LCD screen and/or viewfinder)?

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Schroder
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PostSat Oct 16, 2021 4:55 pm 
I took this a couple of days ago with my Sony A6000

InFlight
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mike
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PostSat Oct 16, 2021 6:10 pm 
Lokicat wrote:
Does your sweat fog-up the back of the camera (LCD screen and/or viewfinder)?
Sometimes fogs up the viewfinder with wides. quick wipe with a handkerchief. My 12-100 is big enough to point down. screen isn't an issues as it folds inwards.

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OwenT
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PostSat Mar 19, 2022 9:12 pm 
I'm prepping for a study abroad program this summer to UK and Italy. One of the focuses will be landscape photography and so I feel like it's a perfect time for me to upgrade my gear. I did a lot of research this week and looked in-depth at some entry-level mirrorless systems that are close to my budget which is about $1000 (sony a6x00, canon m50 ii, fuji x). My professor recommended looking into FujiFilm off the top of his head and after my research, I found myself liking the x-t200 best but then I found the x-E3 and I was pretty much set on that because it has respectable capability all around and the lens options seemed better than others however I'm no lens expert. Then I read this thread. I haven't looked at Olympus yet and I have been shying away from m4/3 in general because I just figured I'd rather have an aps-c to approximate "professional" quality as much as possible while still maintaining portability and low cost. Reading more from the hiking community helps me believe more in the m4/3 since your use cases will probably be closer to mine than to those of the general photography community. I will take a closer look at the recommendations in this thread. On the other hand, I get scared that what I really want in a camera in the backcountry is just a compact option like the rx-100 that I already have. It is limited in some ways but many people say they like the compact systems so much that they abandon their interchangeable lens systems. I'm not sure whether I should try to compromise with a m4/3 for example, or have two systems, one lightweight and one dedicated for times when I want to be focused on photography and not hiking. Of course, that all depends on me.

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mike
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PostSun Mar 20, 2022 10:31 am 
The difference between APS-c and 4:3 is difficult to distinguish. I like my EM5iii. I'd go with either the Sony A7 for "proffesional" or 4:3 for all around carry. (anyone interested in 4:3 gear? bodies and lenses)

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fairweather friend
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PostMon Mar 21, 2022 5:21 am 
Hey Owen, super jealous of the opportunities you'll have to shoot photos in the UK and Italy. Absolutely no shortage of subject matter whether you like to shoot the street or landscapes or architecture or art or whatever. I'd go crazy. Probably take me years just to process all the RAW files I liked! Anyhow, I think you made a great observation that your "big" camera set-up with interchangeable lenses needs to provide significantly more capabilities than your point and shoot, or its just not going to be worth the added expense and hassle. The RX-100 is no slouch in terms of sensor, but the limitations of a small point and shoot can really drive you crazy when you want to take your photography up a notch. I've been there! For me, the "step up" was a Fujifilm XT-3, which is a 26.1 mp crop sensor camera, as you probably know. IMO, everyone (myself included) spends way too much time obsessing about the technical aspects of photography gear (sensor size, image quality at 400x magnification, etc.) and not nearly enough time thinking about whether or not that gear is actually fun to use in the field, for the way that you like to shoot. I love my choice of camera because it just feels easy and natural for me to use and it is a perfect fit for the way I like to shoot: fast, free, creative, experimental, who cares if it doesn't turn out? Other photographers are much more deliberative. Either way works! It just depends on your personal preferences and motivations for taking photos. So here is my advice: No matter what you choose, try it out first. Go to a camera store, borrow from friends, whatever. Just pick up a bunch of different cameras from different manufacturers and see how they feel in your hands. Think about what lenses you'd want with a particular camera and how easy (or not) it would be to carry and use them in the field. Flip through the menu system. Does it seem intuitive to you? Personally, I am baffled by Sony's menus, but they work fine for other photographers. Also, personally, the form factor of the Sony A6xxx series does not work for me, but it works perfectly fine for millions of other photographers. (I have an "old world" schnoz that would look right at home in Rome or Eastern Europe and I literally cannot get my left eye up to the viewfinder of a Sony A6000!). In summary, things like form factor, menu systems, and the "feel" of a camera often seem unimportant compared to the technical specs but, to me, they are the most important factors of all. Good luck and have a fantastic time in Europe!!!!

Gil
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OwenT
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PostMon Mar 21, 2022 4:36 pm 
Thank you. I'll try to find somewhere to go get my hands on some cameras. That will probably help me decide.

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fairweather friend
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PostTue Mar 22, 2022 4:12 am 
Quick correction to my post: I meant 400%, not 400x. Big difference! embarassedlaugh.gif

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gb
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gb
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PostWed Mar 23, 2022 3:20 am 
OwenT wrote:
Thank you. I'll try to find somewhere to go get my hands on some cameras. That will probably help me decide.
Glazers has a good selection of gear and I understand Kenmore Camera does also. The form factor, ergonomics, image stabilization, and weather proofing are all very good on Olympus and Panasonic m4/3 cameras. I doubt very much you would see much difference in IQ until you get up to 50MP or larger vis a vis the crop cameras. Lens selections, and whether you need a tripod make the most difference in kit weight on a day hike or backpack/climbing trip. I am currently using the Olympus EM-1I and the 12-40 or 12-45 lenses as a minimal kit with respect to weight and focal length coverage. I can add the 8mm FE, the Panasonic 35-100 or Panasonic 50-200, and 60 macro if I desire. Another choice for some might be the new Olympus 8-25 F4 and 40-150 F4 lenses for hiking/backpacking. On some hikes to about 10 miles one way I have carried the 300 F4, but it is too large for general purpose hiking - it is just for wildlife, really. As compared to FF, double all the FL's in m4/3 for comparison, use a 1.6 multiplier for APCS. The new OM-1 is supposed to be superb, but I doubt I would need it for hiking/backpacking per se.

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